toll

2 ENTRIES FOUND:

1toll

noun \ˈtōl\

Definition of TOLL

1
:  a tax or fee paid for some liberty or privilege (as of passing over a highway or bridge)
2
:  compensation for services rendered: as
a :  a charge for transportation
b :  a charge for a long-distance telephone call
3
:  a grievous or ruinous price <inflation has taken its toll>; especially :  cost in life or health <the death toll from the hurricane>

Origin of TOLL

Middle English, from Old English, from Vulgar Latin *tolonium, alteration of Late Latin telonium customhouse, from Greek tolōnion, from telōnēs collector of tolls, from telos tax, toll; perhaps akin to Greek tlēnai to bear
First Known Use: before 12th century

Other Transportation Terms

camber, corduroy, demurrage, milestone

2toll

verb

Definition of TOLL

intransitive verb
:  to take or levy toll
transitive verb
1
a :  to exact part of as a toll
b :  to take as toll
2
:  to exact a toll from (someone)

First Known Use of TOLL

14th century

Other Economics Terms

actuary, compound interest, globalization, indemnity, portfolio, rentier, stagflation, usurer

3toll

transitive verb \ˈtōl\
tolled or toledtoll·ing or tol·ing

Definition of TOLL

1
:  allure, entice
2
a :  to entice (game) to approach
b :  to attract (fish) with scattered bait
c :  to lead or attract (domestic animals) to a desired point

Variants of TOLL

toll or tole \ˈtōl\

Origin of TOLL

Middle English tollen, tolen; akin to Old English fortyllan to seduce
First Known Use: 13th century

4toll

verb

Definition of TOLL

transitive verb
1
:  to sound (a bell) by pulling the rope
2
a :  to give signal or announcement of <the clock tolled each hour>
b :  to announce by tolling <church bells tolled the death of the bishop>
c :  to call to or from a place or occasion <bells tolled the congregation to church>
intransitive verb
:  to sound with slow measured strokes <the bell tolls solemnly>

Origin of TOLL

Middle English, to pull, drag, toll (a bell), perhaps alteration of toilen to struggle — more at toil
First Known Use: 15th century

5toll

noun

Definition of TOLL

:  the sound of a tolling bell

First Known Use of TOLL

15th century

toll

noun    (Concise Encyclopedia)

Sum levied on users of certain roads, canals, bridges, tunnels, and other such travel and transportation infrastructure, primarily to pay for construction and maintenance. Tolls were known in the ancient world and were widely used in medieval Europe as a means of supporting bridge construction. Canal building, which became extensive in Europe in the 18th–19th centuries, was financed chiefly by tolls, and many major roads were built by private companies with the right to collect tolls. In the U.S. the National Road, built beginning in 1806, was initially financed through the sale of public land, but maintenance problems led Congress to authorize tolls. Toll roads diminished in the latter part of the 19th century, but the idea was revived with the Pennsylvania Turnpike in the 1930s, and after World War II many states built toll expressways. In many countries tolls are also used to finance long-span bridges, major tunnels, and highways. They have also been blamed for both reducing, and abetting, rush-hour traffic congestion. Canal tolls are still charged in some parts of the world, notably on the Suez and Panama canals.

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