Dictionary

1reform

verb re·form \ri-ˈfrm\

: to improve (someone or something) by removing or correcting faults, problems, etc.

: to improve your own behavior or habits

Full Definition of REFORM

transitive verb
1
a :  to put or change into an improved form or condition
b :  to amend or improve by change of form or removal of faults or abuses
2
:  to put an end to (an evil) by enforcing or introducing a better method or course of action
3
:  to induce or cause to abandon evil ways <reform a drunkard>
4
a :  to subject (hydrocarbons) to cracking
b :  to produce (as gasoline or gas) by cracking
intransitive verb
:  to become changed for the better
re·form·abil·i·ty \-ˌfr-mə-ˈbi-lə-tē\ noun
re·form·able \-ˈfr-mə-bəl\ adjective
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Examples of REFORM

  1. The program is designed to reform prisoners.
  2. They want to reform campaign spending.
  3. The laws need to be reformed.
  4. The program is designed to help former gang members who are trying to reform.

Origin of REFORM

Middle English, from Anglo-French refurmer, from Latin reformare, from re- + formare to form, from forma form
First Known Use: 14th century

Synonym Discussion of REFORM

correct, rectify, emend, remedy, redress, amend, reform, revise mean to make right what is wrong. correct implies taking action to remove errors, faults, deviations, defects <correct your spelling>. rectify implies a more essential changing to make something right, just, or properly controlled or directed <rectify a misguided policy>. emend specifically implies correction of a text or manuscript <emend a text>. remedy implies removing or making harmless a cause of trouble, harm, or evil <set out to remedy the evils of the world>. redress implies making compensation or reparation for an unfairness, injustice, or imbalance <redress past social injustices>. amend, reform, revise imply an improving by making corrective changes, amend usually suggesting slight changes <amend a law>, reform implying drastic change <plans to reform the court system>, and revise suggesting a careful examination of something and the making of necessary changes <revise the schedule>.

correct, accurate, exact, precise, nice, right mean conforming to fact, standard, or truth. correct usually implies freedom from fault or error <correct answers> <socially correct dress>. accurate implies fidelity to fact or truth attained by exercise of care <an accurate description>. exact stresses a very strict agreement with fact, standard, or truth <exact measurements>. precise adds to exact an emphasis on sharpness of definition or delimitation <precise calibration>. nice stresses great precision and delicacy of adjustment or discrimination <makes nice distinctions>. right is close to correct but has a stronger positive emphasis on conformity to fact or truth rather than mere absence of error or fault <the right thing to do>.

2reform

noun

: the improvement of something by removing or correcting faults, problems, etc.

: an action, plan, rule, etc., that is meant to improve something

Full Definition of REFORM

1
:  amendment of what is defective, vicious, corrupt, or depraved
2
:  a removal or correction of an abuse, a wrong, or errors
3
capitalized :  reform judaism

Examples of REFORM

  1. A group of senators are calling for reform of the nation's health-care system.
  2. He has proposed a list of political reforms.

First Known Use of REFORM

1663

3reform

adjective

Definition of REFORM

:  relating to or favoring reform

First Known Use of REFORM

1819
REFORMABLE Defined for Kids

1reform

verb re·form \ri-ˈfrm\
re·formedre·form·ing

Definition of REFORM for Kids

1
:  to make better or improve by removal of faults <The program reforms prisoners.> <The law should be reformed.>
2
:  to stop engaging in bad habits or behavior <He promised to reform.>
re·form·er \ri-ˈfr-mər\ noun

2reform

noun

Definition of REFORM for Kids

:  the improvement of something by removing faults or problems <political reform>

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