moot


1moot

noun \ˈmüt\

Definition of MOOT

1
:  a deliberative assembly primarily for the administration of justice; especially :  one held by the freemen of an Anglo-Saxon community
2
obsolete :  argument, discussion

Origin of MOOT

Middle English, from Old English mōt, gemōt; akin to Middle High German muoze meeting
First Known Use: before 12th century

Other Legal Terms

actionable, alienable, carceral, chattel, complicity, decedent, larceny, malfeasance, modus operandi

2moot

verb \ˈmüt\

: to introduce (an idea, subject, etc.) for discussion

Full Definition of MOOT

transitive verb
1
archaic :  to discuss from a legal standpoint :  argue
2
a :  to bring up for discussion :  broach
b :  debate

Examples of MOOT

  1. <conservatives had shouted down the proposal when it was first mooted>
  2. <the issue of whether a person's nature or upbringing is more important continues to be mooted by experts and laymen alike>
  3. And it was they, not the British, who slapped down any suggestion of democratic reform when it was quietly mooted by British colonial officers in the 1950s. —Ian Buruma, New Republic, 24 Sept. 2001

Origin of MOOT

(see 1moot)
First Known Use: 15th century

Other Legal Terms

actionable, alienable, carceral, chattel, complicity, decedent, larceny, malfeasance, modus operandi

3moot

adjective \ˈmüt\

: not certain : argued about but not possible for people to prove

: not worth talking about : no longer important or worth discussing

Full Definition of MOOT

1
a :  open to question :  debatable
b :  subjected to discussion :  disputed
2
:  deprived of practical significance :  made abstract or purely academic

Examples of MOOT

  1. The court ruled that the issue is now moot because the people involved in the dispute have died.
  2. I think they were wrong, but the point is moot. Their decision has been made and it can't be changed now.
  3. Among the many advantages of legislation requiring a label was that it allowed the industry to insist—in court if necessary—that claims against the companies for negligence and deception were now moot. Every smoker would be repeatedly warned that smoking may be hazardous to your health. —Allan M. Brandt, The Cigarette Century, 2007

Origin of MOOT

(see 1moot)
First Known Use: 1563

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