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malison

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noun mal·i·son \ˈma-lə-sən, -zən\

Definition of malison



Examples of malison in a sentence

  1. <muttered terrible malisons against her child's murderers>



Did You Know?

Malison is still hanging on after being around for eight centuries, but it appears to have suffered the curse of time. Though "malison" still sees occasional use, it is no longer as common as it was in days of yore. Rather, it has been largely supplanted by its younger cousin "malediction." "Malison" and "malediction" are both descendants of the Late Latin word maledictio, itself from maledicere, meaning "to curse." "Maledicere" in turn traces back to Latin male, meaning "badly," and dicere, meaning "to speak or say."

Origin and Etymology of malison

Middle English, from Anglo-French maleiçun, from Late Latin malediction-, maledictio


First Known Use: 13th century


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