Dictionary

litany

noun lit·a·ny \ˈli-tə-nē, ˈlit-nē\

: a prayer in a Christian church service in which the people at the service respond to lines spoken by the person who is leading the service

: a long list of complaints, problems, etc.

plural lit·a·nies

Full Definition of LITANY

1
:  a prayer consisting of a series of invocations and supplications by the leader with alternate responses by the congregation
2
a :  a resonant or repetitive chant <a litany of cheering phrases — Herman Wouk>
b :  a usually lengthy recitation or enumeration <a familiar litany of complaints>
c :  a sizable series or set <a litany of problems>

Examples of LITANY

  1. He has a litany of grievances against his former employer.
  2. The team blamed its losses on a litany of injuries.

Origin of LITANY

Middle English letanie, from Anglo-French & Late Latin; Anglo-French, from Late Latin litania, from Late Greek litaneia, from Greek, entreaty, from litanos supplicant
First Known Use: 13th century

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