junior

21 ENTRIES FOUND:

1ju·nior

adjective \ˈjün-yər\

: younger in age

: lower in standing or rank

: designed for or done by young people

Full Definition of JUNIOR

1
a :  less advanced in age :  younger —used chiefly to distinguish a son with the same given name as his father
b (1) :  youthful
(2) :  designed for young people and especially adolescents
c :  of more recent date and therefore inferior or subordinate <a junior lien>
2
a :  lower in standing or rank <junior partners>
b :  duplicating or suggesting on a smaller scale something typically large or powerful <a junior gale>
3
:  of or relating to juniors or the class of juniors at an educational institution <the junior prom>

Examples of JUNIOR

  1. She is a junior partner in the law firm.
  2. <junior advisers to the governor>

Origin of JUNIOR

Middle English, from Latin, comparative of juvenis young — more at young
First Known Use: 13th century

Other Education Terms

baccalaureate, colloquium, corequisite, dissertation, monograph, pedant, practicum, survey course, thesis

2junior

noun

: a person who is younger than another person

: a person who is of a lower rank than another person

: a student in the third of four years in a high school or college

Full Definition of JUNIOR

1
a (1) :  a person who is younger than another <a man six years my junior> (2) :  a male child :  son (3) :  a young person
b :  a clothing size for women and girls with slight figures
2
a :  a person holding a lower position in a hierarchy of ranks
b :  a student in the next-to-the-last year before graduating from an educational institution
3
capitalized :  a member of a program of the Girl Scouts for girls in the third through sixth grades in school

Examples of JUNIOR

  1. They are my juniors in rank.
  2. She's a junior at the state college.

Origin of JUNIOR

Latin, noun & adjective
First Known Use: 1526

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