hot


1hot

adjective \ˈhät\

: having a high temperature

: having a feeling of high body heat

of food or drink : heated to a hot or warm temperature : served at a hot or warm temperature

hot·terhot·test

Full Definition of HOT

1
a :  having a relatively high temperature
b :  capable of giving a sensation of heat or of burning, searing, or scalding
c :  having heat in a degree exceeding normal body heat
2
a :  violent, stormy <a hot temper> <a hot battle>; also :  angry <got hot about the remark>
b (1) :  sexually excited or receptive
(2) :  sexy
c :  eager, zealous <hot for reform>
d of jazz :  emotionally exciting and marked by strong rhythms and free melodic improvisations
3
:  having or causing the sensation of an uncomfortable degree of body heat <hot and tired> <it's hot in here>
4
a :  newly made :  fresh <a hot scent> <hot off the press>
b :  close to something sought <hot on the trail>
5
a :  suggestive of heat or of burning or glowing objects <hot colors>
b :  pungent, peppery
6
a :  of intense and immediate interest <some hot gossip>
b :  unusually lucky or favorable <on a hot streak>
c :  temporarily capable of unusual performance (as in a sport)
d :  currently popular or in demand <a hot commodity>
e :  very good <a hot idea> <not feeling too hot>
f :  absurd, unbelievable <wants to fight the champ? that's a hot one>
7
a :  electrically energized especially with high voltage
b :  radioactive; also :  dealing with radioactive material
c of an atom or molecule :  being in an excited state
8
a :  recently and illegally obtained <hot jewels>
b :  wanted by the police; also :  unsafe for a fugitive
9
:  fast <a hot new fighter plane> <a hot lap around the track>
hot·ness noun
hot·tish \ˈhä-tish\ adjective
hot under the collar
:  extremely exasperated or angry

Examples of HOT

  1. It is hot in the summer and cold in the winter.
  2. The baked potatoes were too hot to handle with our bare hands.
  3. We worked all afternoon in the hot sun.
  4. The chicken was fried in hot oil.
  5. Your forehead feels hot. I think you might have a fever.
  6. I was feeling hot and tired.
  7. a selection of hot beverages
  8. The new toys are so hot that stores can't keep them in stock.
  9. Her new book is a hot seller.
  10. She spoke about the latest hot trends in the computer industry.

Origin of HOT

Middle English, from Old English hāt; akin to Old High German heiz hot, Lithuanian kaisti to get hot
First Known Use: before 12th century

2hot

adverb

Definition of HOT

1
:  hotly
2
:  fast, quickly

Examples of HOT

  1. <workers were working hot and heavy to repair the breach in the levee>

First Known Use of HOT

before 12th century

3hot

noun

Definition of HOT

1
:  heat 1d(1) <the hot of the day>
2
:  one that is hot (as a hot meal or a horse just after a workout)
3
plural :  strong sexual desire —used with the

First Known Use of HOT

13th century

4hot

verb
hot·tedhot·ting

Definition of HOT

transitive verb
chiefly Southern, southern Midland, & British
:  heat, warm —usually used with up

First Known Use of HOT

1561

hot

adjective \ˈhät\   (Medical Dictionary)
hot·terhot·test

Medical Definition of HOT

1
a : having a relatively high temperature b : capable of giving a sensation of heat or of burning, searing, or scalding c : having heat in a degree exceeding normal body heat
2
a : radioactive; especially : exhibiting a relatively great amount of radioactivity when subjected to radionuclide scanning b : dealing with radioactive material

Browse

Next Word in the Dictionary: hot air
Previous Word in the Dictionary: hosts
All Words Near: hot

Seen & Heard

What made you want to look up hot? Please tell us where you read or heard it (including the quote, if possible).