homicide

4 ENTRIES FOUND:

ho·mi·cide

noun \ˈhä-mə-ˌsīd, ˈhō-\

: the act of killing another person

Full Definition of HOMICIDE

1
:  a person who kills another
2
:  a killing of one human being by another

Examples of HOMICIDE

  1. The number of homicides increased last year.
  2. He has been arrested for homicide.

Origin of HOMICIDE

in sense 1, from Middle English, from Anglo-French, from Latin homicida, from homo human being + -cida -cide; in sense 2, from Middle English, from Anglo-French, from Latin homicidium, from homo + -cidium -cide
First Known Use: 14th century

ho·mi·cide

noun \ˈhäm-ə-ˌsīd, ˈhō-mə-\   (Medical Dictionary)

Medical Definition of HOMICIDE

1
: a person who kills another
2
: a killing of one human being by another—compare genocide

homicide

noun    (Concise Encyclopedia)

Killing of one human being by another. Homicide is a general term; it includes murder, manslaughter, and other criminal homicides as well as noncriminal killings. Murder is the crime of intentionally and unjustifiably killing another. In the U.S., first-degree murder is a homicide committed with premeditation or in the course of a serious felony (e.g., kidnapping). Second- and third-degree murder involve lesser degrees of intent. Manslaughter is commonly divided into voluntary (or first-degree) and involuntary (or second- and third-degree) manslaughter. The first type encompasses any homicide resulting from an intentional act done without malice or premeditation and while in the heat of passion or on sudden provocation; the second type is variously defined in different jurisdictions but often includes an element of unlawful recklessness or negligence. Noncriminal homicides include killings committed in defense of oneself or another and deaths resulting from accidents caused by persons engaged in lawful acts. See also felony and misdemeanour; self-defense.

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