concomitant

2 ENTRIES FOUND:

1con·com·i·tant

adjective \kən-ˈkä-mə-tənt, kän-\

: happening at the same time as something else

Full Definition of CONCOMITANT

:  accompanying especially in a subordinate or incidental way
con·com·i·tant·ly adverb

Examples of CONCOMITANT

  1. The drug's risks increase with the concomitant use of alcohol.
  2. <an improvement in the facilities led to a concomitant improvement in morale>
  3. … Christopher Walken delivers his customary edge without any of his clichéd, concomitant weirdness. —Stephen Whitty, Entertainment Weekly, 12 Feb. 1999

Origin of CONCOMITANT

Latin concomitant-, concomitans, present participle of concomitari to accompany, from com- + comitari to accompany, from comit-, comes companion — more at count
First Known Use: 1607

2con·com·i·tant

noun \kən-ˈkä-mə-tənt, kän-\

: something that happens at the same time as something else : a condition that is associated with some other condition

Full Definition of CONCOMITANT

:  something that accompanies or is collaterally connected with something else :  accompaniment

Examples of CONCOMITANT

  1. hunger, a lack of education, and other concomitants of poverty
  2. <disease is all too often one of the concomitants of poverty>
  3. … there is a demand for schools, professional services, and such other concomitants of a full society as courthouses and jails. —Anthony Bailey, New Yorker, 25 May 1987

Origin of CONCOMITANT

(see 1concomitant)
First Known Use: 1621

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