Dictionary

abide

verb \ə-ˈbīd\

: to accept or bear (someone or something bad, unpleasant, etc.)

: to stay or live somewhere

: to remain or continue

abode \-ˈbōd\ or abid·edabid·ing

Full Definition of ABIDE

transitive verb
1
:  to wait for :  await
2
a :  to endure without yielding :  withstand
b :  to bear patiently :  tolerate <cannot abide such bigots>
3
:  to accept without objection <will abide your decision>
intransitive verb
1
:  to remain stable or fixed in a state
2
:  to continue in a place :  sojourn
abid·er noun
abide by
1
:  to conform to <abide by the rules>
2
:  to acquiesce in <will abide by your decision>

Examples of ABIDE

  1. abide in the house of the Lord
  2. a love that abided till the end of their lives
  3. Now his anger had poisoned all relationships, no one could be put in the two empty beds in the room, and not even his long-suffering sister could abide him in her house. —Peter Pouncey, Rules for Old Men Waiting, 2005

Origin of ABIDE

Middle English, from Old English ābīdan, from ā-, perfective prefix + bīdan to bide; akin to Old High German ir-, perfective prefix — more at BIDE
First Known Use: before 12th century

Synonym Discussion of ABIDE

bear, suffer, endure, abide, tolerate, stand mean to put up with something trying or painful. bear usually implies the power to sustain without flinching or breaking <forced to bear a tragic loss>. suffer often suggests acceptance or passivity rather than courage or patience in bearing <suffering many insults>. endure implies continuing firm or resolute through trials and difficulties <endured years of rejection>. abide suggests acceptance without resistance or protest <cannot abide their rudeness>. tolerate suggests overcoming or successfully controlling an impulse to resist, avoid, or resent something injurious or distasteful <refused to tolerate such treatment>. stand emphasizes even more strongly the ability to bear without discomposure or flinching <unable to stand teasing>.

continue, last, endure, abide, persist mean to exist over a period of time or indefinitely. continue applies to a process going on without ending <the search for peace will continue>. last, especially when unqualified, may stress existing beyond what is normal or expected <buy shoes that will last>. endure adds an implication of resisting destructive forces or agencies <in spite of everything, her faith endured>. abide implies stable and constant existing especially as opposed to mutability <a love that abides through 40 years of marriage>. persist suggests outlasting the normal or appointed time and often connotes obstinacy or doggedness <the sense of guilt persisted>.
ABIDER Defined for Kids

abide

verb \ə-ˈbīd\
abode \-ˈbōd\ or abid·edabid·ing

Definition of ABIDE for Kids

1
:  to put up with patiently :  tolerate <They won't abide bad behavior.>
2
:  1last 1, endure <His love for his work abided until he died.>
3
:  to stay or live in a place <… I shall abide near her all through the night. — E. B. White, The Trumpet of the Swan>
abide by
:  to accept the terms of :  obey <She was forced to abide by the rules.>

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July 06, 2015
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