yield

1 of 2

verb

yielded; yielding; yields

transitive verb

1
a
: to bear or bring forth as a natural product especially as a result of cultivation
the tree always yields good fruit
b
: to produce or furnish as return
this soil should yield good crops
c(1)
: to produce as return from an expenditure or investment : furnish as profit or interest
a bond that yields 12 percent
(2)
: to produce as revenue : bring in
the tax is expected to yield millions
2
: to give up possession of on claim or demand: such as
a
: to surrender or relinquish to the physical control of another : hand over possession of
b
: to give (oneself) up to an inclination, temptation, or habit
c
: to relinquish one's possession of (something, such as a position of advantage or point of superiority)
yield precedence
d
: to surrender or submit (oneself) to another
e
: to give up (one's breath, life, or spirit) and so die
3
: to give or render as fitting, rightfully owed, or required
4
: to give up (a hit or run) in baseball
yielded two runs in the third inning
5
archaic : recompense, reward

intransitive verb

1
: to give way to pressure or influence : submit to urging, persuasion, or entreaty
2
: to give up and cease resistance or contention : submit, succumb
facing an enemy who would not yield
yielding to temptation
3
: to relinquish the floor of a legislative assembly
4
: to give way under physical force (such as bending, stretching, or breaking)
5
a
: to give place or precedence : acknowledge the superiority of someone else
b
: to be inferior
our dictionary yields to none
c
: to give way to or become succeeded by someone or something else
6
: to be fruitful or productive : bear, produce

yield

2 of 2

noun

1
: something yielded : product
especially : the amount or quantity produced or returned
yield of wheat per acre
2
: the capacity of yielding produce
Choose the Right Synonym for yield

yield, submit, capitulate, succumb, relent, defer mean to give way to someone or something that one can no longer resist.

yield may apply to any sort or degree of giving way before force, argument, persuasion, or entreaty.

yields too easily in any argument

submit suggests full surrendering after resistance or conflict to the will or control of another.

a repentant sinner vowing to submit to the will of God

capitulate stresses the fact of ending all resistance and may imply either a coming to terms (as with an adversary) or hopelessness in the face of an irresistible opposing force.

officials capitulated to the protesters' demands

succumb implies weakness and helplessness to the one that gives way or an overwhelming power to the opposing force.

a stage actor succumbing to the lure of Hollywood

relent implies a yielding through pity or mercy by one who holds the upper hand.

finally relented and let the children stay up late

defer implies a voluntary yielding or submitting out of respect or reverence for or deference and affection toward another.

I defer to your expertise in these matters

synonyms see in addition relinquish

Example Sentences

Verb The apple trees yielded an abundant harvest. This soil should yield good crops. The seeds yield a rich oil. New methods have yielded promising results in the field. The studies yielded clear evidence. The tax is expected to yield millions. The bond yields seven percent annually. After several hours of debate, the opposition yielded. I yield the floor to the Senator from Maine. I yield to the Senator. Noun Our yield of wheat increased this year. The average yield per tree is about one bushel. The yield on government bonds is currently seven percent. See More
Recent Examples on the Web
Verb
Use farm-style finds—garden tools, tin containers, and foliage—in creative ways to yield a down-to-earth display. Sarah Martens, Better Homes & Gardens, 21 Nov. 2022 Those were stripped to yield a more straightforward package to provide funds for R&D and manufacturing. Kate Aronoff, The New Republic, 17 Nov. 2022 Each artist or designer develops a way of persuading an AI to yield its best by evolving their prompts. Kevin Kelly, WIRED, 17 Nov. 2022 Those votes included the annexation of the Publix grocery store on U.S. 72 in the Clift Farm development that’s expected to yield more than $700,000 annually in tax revenue for the city that will help pay for the overpasses. Paul Gattis | Pgattis@al.com, al, 14 Nov. 2022 In Nigeria, ambitious plans have yet to yield results despite years of planning. Krista Larson, Anchorage Daily News, 13 Oct. 2022 Many around the country continue to deal with escalating prices on everything from rent to food and gas as inflation increases have yet to yield. Zunaira Zaki, ABC News, 13 Oct. 2022 In Nigeria, ambitious plans have yet to yield results despite years of planning. Krista Larson, The Christian Science Monitor, 12 Oct. 2022 Multiple rounds of indirect talks aimed at reviving the nuclear deal between world powers have yet to yield a result, and hopes for an agreement have been fading. Nima Elbagir, CNN, 5 Aug. 2022
Noun
However, a high-yield savings account (HYSA) offers anywhere from 1% to 3% interest depending on the bank, which would earn you anywhere from an extra $50 to $150 a year. Hannah Oh, Seventeen, 18 Nov. 2022 Musk brainstorms about how his subscription product can grow by building more commerce into the platform, including by offering high yield money market accounts on Twitter that users can link with their bank accounts. Martine Paris, BostonGlobe.com, 18 Nov. 2022 From 1996 to 2021, bonds in that category had a 38% chance of defaulting within 12 months, according to Marty Fridson, a veteran high-yield bond analyst who is chief investment officer of Lehmann Livian Fridson Advisors. Sam Goldfarb, WSJ, 17 Nov. 2022 Gemini Earn is a high-yield product, in which customers earn interest on their deposits, which are lent out to other firms. Scott Nover, Quartz, 17 Nov. 2022 Stick it in a savings account—better yet, a high-yield account—until the future of debt relief is more clear. Alicia Adamczyk, Fortune, 16 Nov. 2022 When asked about how payments could work in the future for Twitter, Musk revealed a potential future in which the platform would feature a number of payment systems like peer-to-peer transfer and even a high-yield money market account. Joe Wituschek, BGR, 9 Nov. 2022 Conical steel wire cages are my go-to for determinate tomatoes (which have a shorter season of producing fruit and often grow fast, compact, and wide) and other high-yield bushy plants like peppers. Natasha Li Pickowicz, Bon Appétit, 3 Nov. 2022 But sometimes farms get a back-to-back high-yield seasons, as is happening this year. Parija Kavilanz, CNN, 2 Nov. 2022 See More

These example sentences are selected automatically from various online news sources to reflect current usage of the word 'yield.' Views expressed in the examples do not represent the opinion of Merriam-Webster or its editors. Send us feedback.

Word History

Etymology

Verb

Middle English, from Old English gieldan; akin to Old High German geltan to pay

First Known Use

Verb

before the 12th century, in the meaning defined at transitive sense 5

Noun

15th century, in the meaning defined at sense 1

Time Traveler
The first known use of yield was before the 12th century

Dictionary Entries Near yield

Cite this Entry

“Yield.” Merriam-Webster.com Dictionary, Merriam-Webster, https://www.merriam-webster.com/dictionary/yield. Accessed 1 Dec. 2022.

Kids Definition

yield 1 of 2

verb

1
: to give up possession of on claim or demand : surrender
2
: to give oneself up to a liking, temptation, or habit
3
a
: to bear as a natural product
trees that yield fruit
b
: to produce as a result of effort
this soil should yield good crops
c
: to return as profit or interest
4
: to bring good results
5
: to give up and stop fighting
will not yield to their enemy
6
: to give way to urging, persuasion, or pleading
7
: to give way under physical force so as to bend, stretch, or break
8
: to admit that someone else is better
yielder
ˈyēl-dər
noun

yield

2 of 2

noun

: something yielded : product
especially : the amount or quantity produced or returned
a high yield of wheat per acre

Legal Definition

yield 1 of 2

transitive verb

: to produce as return from an expenditure or investment : furnish as profit or interest
an account that yields 6 percent

intransitive verb

1
: to give place or precedence (as to one having a superior right or claim)
2
: to relinquish the floor of a legislative assembly
yield to the senator from Maine

yield

2 of 2

noun

1
: agricultural production especially per acre of crop
2
: the return on a financial investment usually expressed as a percentage of cost
the bond yield was 8 percent

More from Merriam-Webster on yield

Last Updated: - Updated example sentences
Love words? Need even more definitions?

Subscribe to America's largest dictionary and get thousands more definitions and advanced search—ad free!


Challenging Words You Should Know

  • hedgehog reading a book
  • Often used to describe “the march of time,” what does inexorable mean?
Spell It

Hear a word and type it out. How many can you get right?

TAKE THE QUIZ
Universal Daily Crossword

A daily challenge for crossword fanatics.

TAKE THE QUIZ