wobble

1 of 2

verb

wob·​ble ˈwä-bəl How to pronounce wobble (audio)
variants or less commonly wabble
wobbled also wabbled; wobbling also wabbling ˈwä-b(ə-)liŋ How to pronounce wobble (audio)

intransitive verb

1
a
: to move or proceed with an irregular rocking or staggering motion or unsteadily and clumsily from side to side
2

transitive verb

: to cause to wobble
wobbler noun
or less commonly wabbler
wobbliness noun
or less commonly wabbliness
wobbly adjective
or less commonly wabbly

wobble

2 of 2

noun

variants or less commonly wabble
1
a
: a hobbling or rocking unequal motion (as of a wheel unevenly mounted)
b
: an uncertainly directed movement
2
: an intermittent variation (as in volume of sound)

Example Sentences

Verb The vase wobbled but didn't fall over. The boy was wobbling along on his bicycle. The table wobbles a little. They have been wobbling in their support of the president's policies.
Recent Examples on the Web
Verb
Even after an overnight stay in the fridge, Perillo’s puddings wobble a little. Sheryl Julian, BostonGlobe.com, 28 June 2022 Boxes that have legs (which is typical for a metal box) should not wobble, adds Thompson. Rennie Dyball, Peoplemag, 13 Oct. 2022 It’s made from durable alloy steel, and the frame has four supportive legs that won’t wobble. Tanya Edwards, Better Homes & Gardens, 23 Sep. 2022 The four murals are large and faded, but the paper squares still wobble into recognizable depictions of Chicagoland icons, from the Marshall Field’s clock to Bears and Cubs logos to the Adler Planetarium and the Prudential Building. Caroline Kubzansky, Chicago Tribune, 20 Sep. 2022 The chair can then wobble back and forth among its four legs, the ends of any three of them lying in the plane of the floor, but the fourth being out of place. Alan Lightman, The Atlantic, 8 Sep. 2022 That star’s exoplanet, Epsilon Indi Ab, is known only through the subtle gravitational wobble its bulk induces on the star. Daniel Leonard, Scientific American, 22 Sep. 2022 An axle started to wobble on the youth movement before the game started. Wilson Moore, The Indianapolis Star, 13 Aug. 2022 Those who decide to see the film in 4DX will experience each movement onscreen as a motion in their seats, which shake and wobble to the rhythm of the action. J. Kim Murphy, Variety, 5 Aug. 2022
Noun
In Tagovailoa’s case, Uribe and the UNCs determined that his wobble last Sunday was the result of a back injury, not a concussion. Ben Volin, BostonGlobe.com, 30 Sep. 2022 Their model also showed that the presence of Chrysalis created enough additional forces to allow Saturn to enter resonance with Neptune, producing its orbital wobble. John Timmer, Ars Technica, 16 Sep. 2022 Next is a downhill through a prehistoric-looking fern-lined gully, with long stairways that place you a wobble away from falling down steep gorges, before one last uphill appropriately named Insult. Peter Hartlaub, San Francisco Chronicle, 1 Nov. 2022 This is due to the placement of the sun, moon and Earth, which are nearly in a flat plane but have a wobble to their orbit. Taylor Nicioli, CNN, 25 Oct. 2022 Saturn's large rotational wobble, where its axis of rotation is over 25° from being perfectly vertical relative to the plane of Saturn's orbit. John Timmer, Ars Technica, 16 Sep. 2022 If muons were alone in the experiment, their spins would not change—but virtual particles arising around them can tug on the muons, introducing a wobble to their spins. Andreas Crivellin, Scientific American, 23 Oct. 2022 The relationship did have another wobble when Andye was back in DC. CNN, 15 Sep. 2022 Ewers earned the right to let that gilded crown wobble atop his mullet Saturday afternoon, minutes after Texas finished off a 49-0 win over Oklahoma at the Cotton Bowl. Nick Moyle, San Antonio Express-News, 8 Oct. 2022 See More

These example sentences are selected automatically from various online news sources to reflect current usage of the word 'wobble.' Views expressed in the examples do not represent the opinion of Merriam-Webster or its editors. Send us feedback.

Word History

Etymology

Verb

probably from Low German wabbeln; akin to Old English wǣfre restless — more at waver

First Known Use

Verb

1657, in the meaning defined at intransitive sense 1a

Noun

1699, in the meaning defined at sense 1a

Time Traveler
The first known use of wobble was in 1657

Dictionary Entries Near wobble

Cite this Entry

“Wobble.” Merriam-Webster.com Dictionary, Merriam-Webster, https://www.merriam-webster.com/dictionary/wobble. Accessed 28 Nov. 2022.

Kids Definition

wobble 1 of 2

verb

wob·​ble ˈwäb-əl How to pronounce wobble (audio)
wobbled; wobbling -(ə-)liŋ How to pronounce wobble (audio)
1
a
: to move or cause to move with a jerky rocking or side-to-side motion
the baby's head wobbled from side to side
b
: tremble entry 1 sense 1
a voice that wobbles
2
: waver sense 1
his opinion wobbled
wobbler noun
wobbly adjective

wobble

2 of 2

noun

: a wobbling action or movement
the wheel had a bad wobble

More from Merriam-Webster on wobble

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