wave

verb
\ ˈwāv How to pronounce wave (audio) \
waved; waving

Definition of wave

 (Entry 1 of 3)

intransitive verb

1 : to motion with the hands or with something held in them in signal or salute
2 : to float, play, or shake in an air current : move loosely to and fro : flutter flags waving in the breeze
3 of water : to move in waves : heave
4 : to become moved or brandished to and fro signs waved in the crowd
5 : to move before the wind with a wavelike motion field of waving grain
6 : to follow a curving line or take a wavy form : undulate

transitive verb

1 : to swing (something) back and forth or up and down
2 : to impart a curving or undulating shape to waved her hair
3a : to motion to (someone) to go in an indicated direction or to stop : signal waved down a passing car
b : to gesture with (the hand or an object) in greeting or farewell or in homage
c : to dismiss or put out of mind : disregard usually used with aside or off
d : to convey by waving waved farewell
4 : brandish, flourish waved a pistol menacingly

wave

noun (1)

Definition of wave (Entry 2 of 3)

1a : a moving ridge or swell on the surface of a liquid (as of the sea)
b chiefly literary : water, sea … this our island in the wave— Charles Dickens The buccaneer on the wave might relinquish his calling and become … a man of probity and piety on land …— Nathaniel Hawthorne The sea was open to them, and they achieved their victories on the briny wave.The Book of Commerce by Sea and Land
2a : a shape or outline having successive curves
b : a waviness of the hair
c : an undulating line or streak or a pattern formed by such lines
3 : something that swells and dies away: such as
a : a surge of sensation or emotion a wave of anger swept over her
b : a movement sweeping large numbers in a common direction waves of protest
c : a peak or climax of activity a wave of buying
4 : a sweep of hand or arm or of some object held in the hand used as a signal or greeting
5 : a rolling or undulatory movement or one of a series of such movements passing along a surface or through the air
6 : a movement like that of an ocean wave: such as
a : a surging movement of a group a big new wave of women politicians
b : one of a succession of influxes of people migrating into a region
c(1) : a moving group of animals of one kind
(2) : a sudden rapid increase in a population
d : a line of attacking or advancing troops or airplanes
e : a display of people in a large crowd (as at a sports event) successively rising, lifting their arms overhead, and quickly sitting so as to form a swell moving through the crowd
7a : a disturbance or variation that transfers energy progressively from point to point in a medium and that may take the form of an elastic deformation or of a variation of pressure, electric or magnetic intensity, electric potential, or temperature
b : one complete cycle of such a disturbance
8 : a marked change in temperature : a period of hot or cold weather
9 : an undulating or jagged line constituting a graphic representation of an action

Wave

noun (2)
\ ˈwāv How to pronounce Wave (audio) \

Definition of Wave (Entry 3 of 3)

: a member of the women's component of the U.S. Navy formed during World War II and discontinued in the 1970s

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Other Words from wave

Noun (1)

waveless \ ˈwāv-​ləs How to pronounce Wave (audio) \ adjective
wavelessly adverb
wavelike \ ˈwāv-​ˌlīk How to pronounce Wave (audio) \ adjective

Synonyms for wave

Synonyms: Verb

Synonyms: Noun (1)

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Choose the Right Synonym for wave

Verb

swing, wave, flourish, brandish, thrash mean to wield or cause to move to and fro or up and down. swing implies regular or uniform movement. swing the rope back and forth wave usually implies smooth or continuous motion. waving the flag flourish suggests vigorous, ostentatious, graceful movement. flourished the winning lottery ticket brandish implies threatening or menacing motion. brandishing a knife thrash suggests vigorous, abrupt, violent movement. an infant thrashing his arms about

Examples of wave in a Sentence

Verb We waved to our friends through the window. She was waving in the direction of the bridge. Flags were waving in the breeze. The magician waved his magic wand. The leader of the parade waved a flag. It was so hot that we were all waving our hands in front of our faces to cool off. Noun (1) The waves crashed onto the rocks. She has a wave in her hair. Waves of warm air washed over us. We got a wave from the Queen. The rabbit disappeared with a wave of the magician's wand.
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Recent Examples on the Web: Verb There are also plenty of people who don’t have children who will feel the urge to wave away worries with numbers. Washington Post, 15 Aug. 2021 Only a handful of applicants showed up, despite staff efforts to wave down passing cars and a promotional campaign that included posts on Facebook and Indeed.com. Susan Degrane, chicagotribune.com, 28 July 2021 The gesture of humility and humanity led one sista to wave her hands in praise and gratitude. Donna Owens, Essence, 2 Apr. 2021 Two hundred flags wave in front of the Prophet Elias Greek Orthodox Church in Holladay in celebration of Greek Independence Day. Kathy Stephenson, The Salt Lake Tribune, 24 Mar. 2021 Protesters sing and wave flashlights in Yangon as the country entered its seventh week under military rule. USA Today, 20 Mar. 2021 The clip shows Ghani heading up the stairs of a KamAir plane and turning around to wave to people on the ground. Mckenzie Sadeghi, USA TODAY, 20 Aug. 2021 Many cars stopped to wave to the marchers and present the Black power fist. Drake Bentley, Milwaukee Journal Sentinel, 25 May 2021 Afghan women shout slogans and wave Afghan national flags during demonstrations earlier this week. Saphora Smith, NBC News, 9 Sep. 2021 Recent Examples on the Web: Noun Millimeter wave technology uses non-ionizing radio frequency energy to generate a three-dimensional image of the body, according to a fact sheet from the Department of Homeland Security. Mckenzie Sadeghi, USA TODAY, 14 Oct. 2021 Last winter, epidemiologists worried that a COVID-19 winter wave could coincide with annual influenza outbreak, leaving hospitals and healthcare workers overrun with patients suffering from two different infectious diseases. Brett Haensel, Fortune, 13 Oct. 2021 Robinhood Markets is best known as a zero-commission brokerage app that Millennials turned to, to cash in on the soaring Covid-19 stock market and to ride the meme stock wave. Trefis Team, Forbes, 13 Oct. 2021 Everyone will be enjoying their final season before that little school in Chatsworth arrives with all its big-name players and an annual wave of transfer students. Eric Sondheimer Columnist, Los Angeles Times, 12 Oct. 2021 That wave has also dented the market for debentures, payments that parents can make to international schools to gain priority in the cutthroat admissions process. New York Times, 11 Oct. 2021 But there was not an immediate wave of workers returning to jobs. Heather Long, Anchorage Daily News, 10 Oct. 2021 Daily admissions peaked at around 1,000, lower than the 4,200 a day experienced in the deadlier Covid-19 wave in January, and are currently around 700 a day. Jason Douglas, WSJ, 9 Oct. 2021 That novel approach to enforcement is the reason why Texas had been able to evade an earlier wave of legal challenges prior to this week. Paul J. Weber, chicagotribune.com, 9 Oct. 2021

These example sentences are selected automatically from various online news sources to reflect current usage of the word 'wave.' Views expressed in the examples do not represent the opinion of Merriam-Webster or its editors. Send us feedback.

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First Known Use of wave

Verb

14th century, in the meaning defined at sense 2

Noun (1)

1526, in the meaning defined at sense 1a

Noun (2)

1942, in the meaning defined above

History and Etymology for wave

Verb

Middle English, from Old English wafian to wave with the hands; akin to Old English wæfan to clothe and perhaps to Old English wefan to weave

Noun (2)

Women Accepted for Volunteer Emergency Service

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Learn More About wave

Time Traveler for wave

Time Traveler

The first known use of wave was in the 14th century

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Dictionary Entries Near wave

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wave

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Statistics for wave

Last Updated

14 Oct 2021

Cite this Entry

“Wave.” Merriam-Webster.com Dictionary, Merriam-Webster, https://www.merriam-webster.com/dictionary/wave. Accessed 18 Oct. 2021.

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More Definitions for wave

wave

verb

English Language Learners Definition of wave

 (Entry 1 of 2)

: to move your hand or something held in your hand usually in a repeated motion in order to signal or greet someone
: to float, shake, or move back and forth because of wind
: to move (something) back and forth

wave

noun

English Language Learners Definition of wave (Entry 2 of 2)

: an area of moving water that is raised above the main surface of an ocean, a lake, etc.
: something that has the shape or movement of a wave
: a usually repeated movement of your hand or of something held in your hand especially as a signal or greeting

wave

verb
\ ˈwāv How to pronounce wave (audio) \
waved; waving

Kids Definition of wave

 (Entry 1 of 2)

1 : to move (as the hand) to and fro as a signal or in greeting
2 : to move (something) back and forth The Black Knight waved his lance weakly over our heads.— Jon Scieszka, Knights of the Kitchen Table
3 : to curve slightly Her hair waves naturally.
4 : to flutter with a rolling movement Flags waved in the wind.

wave

noun

Kids Definition of wave (Entry 2 of 2)

1 : a moving ridge on the surface of water
2 : a waving motion a wave of the hand
3 : something that swells and dies away A wave of anger came over her.
4 : a rolling movement passing along a surface or through the air waves of grain
5 : a curving shape or series of curving shapes hair with waves
6 : a sudden increase in something a crime wave
7 : a motion that is somewhat like a wave in water and transfers energy from point to point sound waves

wave

noun
\ ˈwāv How to pronounce wave (audio) \

Medical Definition of wave

1a : a disturbance or variation that transfers energy progressively from point to point in a medium and that may take the form of an elastic deformation or of a variation of pressure, electrical or magnetic intensity, electrical potential, or temperature
b : one complete cycle of such a disturbance
2 : an undulating or jagged line constituting a graphic representation of an action an electroencephalographic wave

More from Merriam-Webster on wave

Nglish: Translation of wave for Spanish Speakers

Britannica English: Translation of wave for Arabic Speakers

Britannica.com: Encyclopedia article about wave

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