tilt

1 of 4

verb (1)

tilted; tilting; tilts

transitive verb

1
: to cause to have an inclination
2
a
: to point or thrust in or as if in a tilt
tilt a lance
b
: to charge against
tilt an adversary

intransitive verb

1
a
: to move or shift so as to lean or incline : slant
b
: to incline, tend, or become drawn toward an opinion, course of action, or one side of a controversy
2
a
: to engage in a combat with lances : joust
b
: to make an impetuous attack
tilt at social evils
tiltable adjective
tilter noun

tilt

2 of 4

noun (1)

1
a
: the act of tilting : the state or position of being tilted
b
: a sloping surface
c
: slant, bias
a tilt toward military involvement
2
3
: any of various contests resembling or suggesting tilting with lances
4
a
: a contest on horseback in which two combatants charging with lances or similar weapons try to unhorse each other : joust
b
: a tournament of tilts
tilt adjective

tilt

3 of 4

noun (2)

: a canopy for a wagon, boat, or stall

tilt

4 of 4

verb (2)

tilted; tilting; tilts

transitive verb

: to cover or provide with a tilt

Examples of tilt in a Sentence

Recent Examples on the Web
Verb
Millions of people will tilt their heads skyward on Monday, marveling at a total solar eclipse. Nicholas Bogel-Burroughs, New York Times, 8 Apr. 2024 The moon's orbit around Earth is tilted compared with Earth's around the sun. Emily Mae Czachor, CBS News, 7 Apr. 2024 The second pier tilted, resulting in the partial collapse of the bridge. Sarah Al-Arshani, USA TODAY, 27 Mar. 2024 The touch screen is sufficiently bright and detailed, and the entire control panel can be tilted vertically to optimize the viewing angles. David English, PCMAG, 27 Mar. 2024 This desk fan has three speeds, and its head can be tilted 90 degrees vertically. Camryn Rabideau, Peoplemag, 12 Mar. 2024 The artist Kiyan Williams was referring to federal architecture — specifically the northern facade of the White House, which reappears, redesigned in dirt and tilted 15 degrees off its axis, on a roof terrace at this year’s Whitney Biennial. Zachary Small, New York Times, 22 Mar. 2024 The moon has drawn closer to Earth, and its orbit is tilted just so. Marina Koren, The Atlantic, 21 Mar. 2024 Typically on June 20 or 21, the summer solstice occurs in the Northern Hemisphere because this area of Earth is tilted toward the sun. Caitlin O'Kane, CBS News, 20 Mar. 2024
Noun
But, experts warn, the findings display far from a unanimous tilt towards China amid the great-power rivalry vexing the region. Koh Ewe, TIME, 2 Apr. 2024 The chair also had gas-lift levers that controlled height and tilt — good news for women, who were joining the work force in record numbers, and whose comfort had been ignored by earlier designers. Evan Moffitt, New York Times, 28 Mar. 2024 Because of New Jersey's Democratic tilt, the eventual nominee will be the favorite in November's general election. Tal Axelrod, ABC News, 14 Mar. 2024 First pitch is scheduled for 4:05 p.m. next Friday, March 15, at Hohokam Stadium in Mesa, following the Giants’ Cactus League tilt against the A’s. Evan Webeck, The Mercury News, 7 Mar. 2024 The odds also tend to increase around equinoxes — the vernal equinox occurred last week — due to a more favorable tilt in the Earth’s axis, Murtagh said. Hayley Smith, Los Angeles Times, 24 Mar. 2024 Arizona could determine the majority in the House and Senate — and single-handedly tilt the presidential race. USA TODAY, 20 Mar. 2024 Her chin tilt is the very axis on which the show spins. Margaret Lyons, New York Times, 14 Mar. 2024 This is due to the Northern Hemisphere being farther away from the sun because of tilt of the Earth’s axis during the winter months. The Enquirer, 13 Mar. 2024

These examples are programmatically compiled from various online sources to illustrate current usage of the word 'tilt.' Any opinions expressed in the examples do not represent those of Merriam-Webster or its editors. Send us feedback about these examples.

Word History

Etymology

Verb (1) and Noun (1)

Middle English tulten, tilten to fall over, cause to fall, from Old English *tyltan, *tieltan, akin to Old English tealt unstable, tealtian to totter

Noun (2)

Middle English teld, telte tent, canopy, from Old English teld; akin to Old High German zelt tent

First Known Use

Verb (1)

1594, in the meaning defined at transitive sense 1

Noun (1)

1507, in the meaning defined at sense 4a

Noun (2)

15th century, in the meaning defined above

Verb (2)

15th century, in the meaning defined above

Time Traveler
The first known use of tilt was in the 15th century

Dictionary Entries Near tilt

Cite this Entry

“Tilt.” Merriam-Webster.com Dictionary, Merriam-Webster, https://www.merriam-webster.com/dictionary/tilt. Accessed 20 Apr. 2024.

Kids Definition

tilt

1 of 2 verb
1
: to move or shift so as to slant or tip
2
: to take part in a contest with lances : joust
tilter noun

tilt

2 of 2 noun
1
: a contest on horseback in which two opponents charging with lances try to unhorse each other : joust
2
: a contest with words between opponents
3
: speed entry 1 sense 1b
at full tilt
4
: the act of tilting : the state or position of being tilted

More from Merriam-Webster on tilt

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