surmise

noun
sur·​mise | \ sər-ˈmīz How to pronounce surmise (audio) , ˈsər-ˌmīz \

Definition of surmise

 (Entry 1 of 2)

: a thought or idea based on scanty evidence : conjecture

surmise

verb
sur·​mise | \ sər-ˈmīz How to pronounce surmise (audio) \
surmised; surmising

Definition of surmise (Entry 2 of 2)

transitive verb

: to form a notion of from scanty evidence : imagine, infer

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Synonyms for surmise

Synonyms: Noun

Synonyms: Verb

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Examples of surmise in a Sentence

Noun my surmise is that the couple's “good news” is the announcement that they are going to have a baby Verb We can only surmise what happened. He must have surmised that I was not interested.
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Recent Examples on the Web: Noun More plausible, Bierson and his team surmise, is a scenario in which Pluto formed over a mere 30,000 years as rocks, just a few inches wide and drawn in towards the planet by its own gravity, pelted the nascent world’s surface. Popular Science, 29 June 2020 Scientists cite several layers of evidence to support their surmises. Los Angeles Times, 9 May 2020 To make sense of a correspondence, however complete or incomplete, is to constellate fragmentary evidence, and make surmises about what is missing (including what may not have been apparent to the letter-writers themselves). Langdon Hammer, The New York Review of Books, 25 Feb. 2020 Entertaining those that remained into Monday morning, of course, with enough crazy choreography to make any festival-goer surmise that those hand-out sandwiches may well have been dosed. Gary Graff, Billboard, 14 Aug. 2019 The wild surmise of his design sketches beguiled virtually all who saw them. Bill Wyman, New York Times, 6 Mar. 2020 His surmise that official Washington is less enamored of his border wall than are the participants at his campaign rallies is correct. James Freeman, WSJ, 29 Jan. 2020 Though there’s no micro-level evidence on savings rates to check this against, cautions Schmelzing, this surmise is consistent with narrative accounts and research on longer-term wealth evolution. Gwynn Guilford, Quartz, 19 Jan. 2020 My surmise is that the statement is not logical but political: its officials harbor the fear that the Holocaust will become little more than a polemical weapon in ideological contests between left and right. Peter E. Gordon, The New York Review of Books, 7 Jan. 2020 Recent Examples on the Web: Verb The London bettors surmise that her role as a kick-ass member of the cast in No Time To Die helps rather than hurts her chances. Guy Martin, Forbes, 29 Sep. 2021 Curators Laura Llewellyn and John Witty surmise that this gorgeous panel was once at the center of a large altarpiece. Los Angeles Times, 20 July 2021 Now, the cynic might surmise that’s because top prospects Josh Jung, a third baseman, and Sam Huff, a catcher, are both recovering from surgeries and because center fielder Leody Taveras has already been demoted. Evan Grant, Dallas News, 4 May 2021 Experts like Thomas surmise that fragrance will continue to perform well in 2021 as consumers re-engage with the world. Kristin Larson, Forbes, 27 Apr. 2021 Some veteran border analysts surmise that smuggling networks have capacity limitations of their own — vehicles, safe houses, coyote guides — that can hamper their ability to scale up operations at an exponential pace. Washington Post, 23 Apr. 2021 The only logical next step is to surmise that this product serves someone else. Fouad Khan, Scientific American, 1 Apr. 2021 Those lockdown policies, some experts surmise, are at least in part responsible for the increase in homicides. Joseph Simonson, Washington Examiner, 24 Mar. 2021 Researchers surmise that this year’s flu season was nearly non-existent at least partly or perhaps fully because of our country’s use of masks and social distancing practices. Popular Science, 12 Mar. 2021

These example sentences are selected automatically from various online news sources to reflect current usage of the word 'surmise.' Views expressed in the examples do not represent the opinion of Merriam-Webster or its editors. Send us feedback.

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First Known Use of surmise

Noun

1569, in the meaning defined above

Verb

1647, in the meaning defined above

History and Etymology for surmise

Noun

Middle English, allegation, charge, from Anglo-French, from feminine of surmis, past participle of surmettre to place on, suppose, accuse, from Medieval Latin supermittere, from Late Latin, to place on, from Latin super- + mittere to let go, send

Verb

Middle English, to allege, from surmise, noun

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Time Traveler for surmise

Time Traveler

The first known use of surmise was in 1569

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Dictionary Entries Near surmise

surmisable

surmise

surmiser

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Cite this Entry

“Surmise.” Merriam-Webster.com Dictionary, Merriam-Webster, https://www.merriam-webster.com/dictionary/surmise. Accessed 25 Oct. 2021.

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More Definitions for surmise

surmise

verb

English Language Learners Definition of surmise

: to form an opinion about something without definitely knowing the truth : guess

surmise

noun
sur·​mise | \ sər-ˈmīz How to pronounce surmise (audio) \

Kids Definition of surmise

 (Entry 1 of 2)

: a thought or idea based on very little evidence : guess

surmise

verb
surmised; surmising

Kids Definition of surmise (Entry 2 of 2)

: to form an idea on very little evidence : guess

More from Merriam-Webster on surmise

Nglish: Translation of surmise for Spanish Speakers

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