substitution

noun

sub·​sti·​tu·​tion ˌsəb-stə-ˈtü-shən How to pronounce substitution (audio)
-ˈtyü-
1
a
: the act, process, or result of substituting one thing for another
b
: replacement of one mathematical entity by another of equal value
2
: one that is substituted for another
substitutional
ˌsəb-stə-ˈtü-shnəl How to pronounce substitution (audio)
-shə-nᵊl
-ˈtyü-
adjective
substitutionally adverb
substitutionary adjective

Examples of substitution in a Sentence

The coach made three substitutions in the second half of the game. I'd prefer rice with my steak instead of potatoes, but the menu says “no substitutions.” Substitution of applesauce for oil is one way of reducing the fat in recipes. The cookbook has a long list of substitutions for ingredients that may be hard to find.
Recent Examples on the Web The eye on the ball is emissions – not merely fuel and energy source substitution. University Of Houston Energy Fellows, Forbes, 13 Feb. 2024 Will this substitution effect result in firms hiring more workers? Alexander William Salter, National Review, 12 Feb. 2024 The vegetarian dinner is significantly cheaper with similar options, except carrot bisque, risotto and black truffle potato substitutions. Brianna Taylor, Sacramento Bee, 12 Feb. 2024 This group began Tuesday’s game by building a 16-4 lead before the Heat made its first substitution of the night. Anthony Chiang, Miami Herald, 7 Feb. 2024 If a pie isn't in the cards, this relatively easy pound cake recipe with a beautiful key lime glaze is a welcome substitution. Lisa Cericola, Southern Living, 5 Feb. 2024 World Rugby noted that its concussion protocols have evolved and have been revised in 2012, 2014, 2019, 2021 and 2022 to increase substitution time and adapt tests for concussion. Amy Woodyatt, CNN, 5 Feb. 2024 Many economists argued in favor of import substitution in developing countries. Andrew Stuttaford, National Review, 5 Feb. 2024 That’s the raison d’être of modelling—substitution. Dan Rockmore, The New Yorker, 15 Jan. 2024 See More

These examples are programmatically compiled from various online sources to illustrate current usage of the word 'substitution.' Any opinions expressed in the examples do not represent those of Merriam-Webster or its editors. Send us feedback about these examples.

Word History

Etymology

Middle English substitucion, from Middle French, from Late Latin substitution-, substitutio, from substituere

First Known Use

14th century, in the meaning defined at sense 1a

Time Traveler
The first known use of substitution was in the 14th century

Dictionary Entries Near substitution

Cite this Entry

“Substitution.” Merriam-Webster.com Dictionary, Merriam-Webster, https://www.merriam-webster.com/dictionary/substitution. Accessed 4 Mar. 2024.

Medical Definition

substitution

noun
sub·​sti·​tu·​tion ˌsəb-stə-ˈt(y)ü-shən How to pronounce substitution (audio)
1
: a chemical reaction in which one or more atoms or groups in a molecule are replaced by equivalent atoms or groups to form at least two products
especially : the replacement of hydrogen in an organic compound by another element or group
2
a
: the turning from an obstructed desire to another desire whose gratification is socially acceptable
b
: the turning from an obstructed form of behavior to a different and often more primitive expression of the same tendency
a substitution neurosis
c
: the reacting to each of a set of stimuli by a response prescribed in a key
a substitution test for speed of learning new responses

Legal Definition

substitution

noun
sub·​sti·​tu·​tion ˌsəb-stə-ˈtü-shən, -ˈtyü- How to pronounce substitution (audio)
: the substituting of one person or thing for another: as
a
in the civil law of Louisiana : a disposition not in trust by which a donee, heir, or legatee is charged to hold property transferred and return it to a third person compare fidei commissum, vulgar substitution

Note: Substitutions are prohibited.

b
: replacement of a party to an action with a successor or representative upon motion to the court when the party is unable to continue litigating (as because of death, incompetency, transfer of interest, or loss of the office for which the party was suing or being sued in an official capacity)
c
: the replacement of a new agreement or obligation for an old one see also novation
substitutional adjective
substitutionary adjective
Last Updated: - Updated example sentences
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