smack

1 of 7

noun (1)

1
: characteristic taste or flavor
also : a perceptible taste or tincture
2
: a small quantity

smack

2 of 7

verb (1)

smacked; smacking; smacks

intransitive verb

1
: to have a taste or flavor
2
: to have a trace, vestige, or suggestion
a proposal that smacks of treason

smack

3 of 7

noun (2)

: a sailing ship (such as a sloop or cutter) used chiefly in coasting and fishing

smack

4 of 7

verb (2)

smacked; smacking; smacks

transitive verb

1
: to close and open (lips) noisily and often in rapid succession especially in eating
2
a
: to kiss with or as if with a smack
b
: to strike so as to produce a smack

intransitive verb

: to make or give a smack

smack

5 of 7

noun (3)

1
: a quick sharp noise made by rapidly compressing and opening the lips
2
: a loud kiss
3
: a sharp slap or blow
4
US, informal : boastful or insulting language especially between opponents : smack talk, trash talk
usually used in the phrase talk smack
The college basketball season is barely a month old, yet the top two candidates for national player of the year are already talking smack.Grant Wahl

smack

6 of 7

adverb

: squarely and sharply : directly
smack in the middle

smack

7 of 7

noun (4)

slang
: heroin

Examples of smack in a Sentence

Adverb She dropped the book smack in the middle of the table. The ball hit me smack in the face.
Recent Examples on the Web
Noun
This puts the 2026 FIFA World Cup smack in the middle of the wildfire season, which has only worsened with the onset of climate change — blanketing both coasts last summer. Vitas Carosella, Forbes, 11 Feb. 2024 Keith seemed to enjoy talking smack as much as defending America, almost like a wrestler in a feud. Nadine Smith, Rolling Stone, 6 Feb. 2024 Do so in nearby preserves like Jackson Demonstration State Forest, Russian Gulch State Park, and Otis R. Johnson Wilderness Park, a local favorite smack dab in the middle of town. Chelsee Lowe, Travel + Leisure, 5 Feb. 2024 Speaking of which, Kathy's out on the sun porch talking smack about her competitors with Susan, April, and Nancy. Kristen Baldwin, EW.com, 13 Oct. 2023 Over the past 100 years, Americans went from being some of the tallest people in the world to ranking somewhere smack in the middle. Devika Rao, theweek, 7 Jan. 2024 But the company decided to put out its news right smack dab in the middle of the world’s biggest tech event, so it’s getting pulled into the gravity of it. Condé Nast, WIRED, 5 Aug. 2023 New York City sits right smack on the edge of the Atlantic Ocean — a gigantic thermo-moderating influence that is absent from middle America. Paul Cappiello, The Courier-Journal, 5 Jan. 2024 Sally and Harry’s visit to the deli is one of the film’s most iconic scenes of the film, with Ryan’s character making loud, fake orgasm sounds right smack in the middle of the popular restaurant. Christy Piña, The Hollywood Reporter, 19 Dec. 2023
Verb
In one, a young chimp lightly smacks her mother’s back, then sprints a short distance to cautiously gauge her response; in another, a male gorilla ambushes his mom from behind with a galloping jump attack. Katherine J. Wu, The Atlantic, 14 Feb. 2024 The crowd got a showstopper, from the artist smack dab in the middle of that night’s lineup. Josh Crutchmer, Rolling Stone, 12 Feb. 2024 The Kia smacked the inside wall and began heading across the highway. David J. Neal, Miami Herald, 11 Feb. 2024 The CubeSat will then free-fall and smack into the lunar surface at about 10 meters per second (22 miles per hour). Michael Greshko, Scientific American, 9 Feb. 2024 The two started talking trash in the fourth quarter and things escalated when Brooks smacked James in the eye, sending him to the court. Broderick Turner, Los Angeles Times, 30 Jan. 2024 Cut to Aang zipping around to entertain the village’s children before smacking face-first into a rock sculpture. Jp Mangalindan, Peoplemag, 23 Jan. 2024 And if there is a follow-up, your subsequent responses can take longer and longer — until your old friend gets the idea without your having to smack him. Jacobina Martin, Washington Post, 3 Jan. 2024 At the swanky Le Bar, grab a seat at the transparent bar (it is made from a single piece of resin), and sip your bubbly while smack in the center of the action. Catherine Garcia, theweek, 30 Jan. 2024
Adverb
The account of how Yentl came to be falls smack in the middle of Streisand’s new, nearly 1,000-page memoir, My Name Is Barbra, and for that reason alone is an important keystone for understanding her. Gal Beckerman, The Atlantic, 7 Nov. 2023 Then came the extracurricular activities that could have been easily predicted since both coaching staffs were talking smack before the game in front of players. Eric Sondheimer, Los Angeles Times, 6 Oct. 2023 The debut came smack in the middle of the actors’ and writers’ strikes. Rebecca Angelo, Los Angeles Times, 13 Oct. 2023 The fact that the N.B.A. draft occurred smack in the middle of the Paris men’s wear shows was something of a cosmically appropriate coincidence. Vanessa Friedman, New York Times, 23 June 2023 The sharks’ diets fell smack between a pure herbivore and a pure carnivore, the researchers report, meaning whale sharks are actually omnivores. Roni Dengler, Discover Magazine, 16 Jan. 2019 But the concerns about environmental fallout ran smack into a wall of decades-old law. Ken Ward Jr., ProPublica, 26 Apr. 2023 Yet those preferences are running smack into a push by employers to get people back in the office. Khristopher J. Brooks, CBS News, 4 Apr. 2023 The famous brothers break down plays, talk smack to each other and welcome special guests. Dallas News, 28 Sep. 2021 See More

These examples are programmatically compiled from various online sources to illustrate current usage of the word 'smack.' Any opinions expressed in the examples do not represent those of Merriam-Webster or its editors. Send us feedback about these examples.

Word History

Etymology

Noun (1)

Middle English, from Old English smæc; akin to Old High German smac taste and probably to Lithuanian smaguris sweet tooth

Noun (2)

Dutch smak or Low German smack

Verb (2)

akin to Middle Dutch smacken to strike

Noun (4)

perhaps from Yiddish shmek sniff, whiff, pinch (of snuff)

First Known Use

Noun (1)

before the 12th century, in the meaning defined at sense 1

Verb (1)

13th century, in the meaning defined at sense 1

Noun (2)

1533, in the meaning defined above

Verb (2)

1557, in the meaning defined at transitive sense 1

Noun (3)

1570, in the meaning defined at sense 1

Adverb

1782, in the meaning defined above

Noun (4)

circa 1960, in the meaning defined above

Time Traveler
The first known use of smack was before the 12th century

Dictionary Entries Near smack

Cite this Entry

“Smack.” Merriam-Webster.com Dictionary, Merriam-Webster, https://www.merriam-webster.com/dictionary/smack. Accessed 23 Feb. 2024.

Kids Definition

smack

1 of 5 noun
1
: characteristic or slight taste or flavor
2
: a small quantity

smack

2 of 5 verb
: to have a flavor, trace, or suggestion

smack

3 of 5 verb
1
: to close and open the lips noisily especially in eating
2
: to kiss usually loudly
3
: to make or give a sharp slap or blow

smack

4 of 5 noun
1
: a quick sharp noise made by rapidly opening and closing the lips
2
: a loud kiss
3
: a sharp slap or blow

smack

5 of 5 adverb
: in a square and sharp manner : directly
hit me smack in the face
Etymology

Noun

Old English smæc "a characteristic taste or flavor"

More from Merriam-Webster on smack

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