sequester

verb
se·​ques·​ter | \ si-ˈkwe-stər How to pronounce sequester (audio) \
sequestered; sequestering\ si-​ˈkwe-​st(ə-​)riŋ How to pronounce sequester (audio) \

Definition of sequester

 (Entry 1 of 2)

transitive verb

1a : to set apart : segregate sequester a jury
b : seclude, withdraw widely spaced homes are forbiddingly grand and sequestered— Don Asher
2a : to seize especially by a writ of sequestration
b : to place (property) in custody especially in sequestration
3 : to bind (a metal or metal ion) in the form of a soluble complex or chelate by adding a suitable reagent for the purpose of preventing precipitation in water solution by chemical agents that would normally bring it about, of solubilizing precipitates already formed, or of otherwise suppressing undesired chemical or biological activity sequester calcium and magnesium ions in the softening of hard water also : to bind or absorb (carbon dioxide) as part of a larger chemical process or compound … half of the starting material will be used up and half will be char. That can then be put back on the fields, where it will sequester carbon and help grow the next crop. — Emma Marris

sequester

noun

Definition of sequester (Entry 2 of 2)

1 : the imposition of automatic government spending reductions in accordance with sequestration
2 obsolete : separation, isolation

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Synonyms & Antonyms for sequester

Synonyms: Verb

Antonyms: Verb

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Examples of sequester in a Sentence

Verb The jury was sequestered until a verdict was reached. He was sequestered in his room.
Recent Examples on the Web: Verb Warmer tundra soils are already producing more shrubs and ultimately could support trees, which would sequester some of the carbon lost from soils and permafrost in their wood. Randi Jandt, Scientific American, 1 Oct. 2021 And when a blaze tears through, any carbon that trees managed to sequester in their tissues is turned right back into atmospheric gas. Matt Simon, Wired, 9 Aug. 2021 Doing so will allow forests and grasslands to be restored more quickly and sequester more carbon dioxide in the process. Erik Kobayashi-solomon, Forbes, 26 May 2021 After a couple of weeks, the blood is rife with antibodies—molecules, made by B cells, that can sequester viruses outside cells—and aptly named killer T cells, which can blow up cells that have already been infected. Katherine J. Wu, The Atlantic, 3 Sep. 2021 By some estimates, a trillion trees could sequester some 200 gigatons of carbon over their lifetimes—equal to the annual emissions from more than 43 billion cars. Marc Benioff, Time, 27 Aug. 2021 By their calculations, if grown widely, such plants might sequester up to 20% of the excess carbon dioxide that humans add to the atmosphere every year. Quanta Magazine, 2 Aug. 2021 That number is itself way below the $1,100 that a Swiss company Climeworks charges to capture and permanently sequester one metric ton of carbon dioxide. Shivaram Rajgopal, Forbes, 1 June 2021 Nordic Farm will be converted from a big dairy farm into a grain-growing demonstration school and agricultural-innovation station, with a particular focus on farming practices that help sequester more carbon in the soil. Bill Mckibben, The New Yorker, 16 June 2021 Recent Examples on the Web: Noun Grapes such as syrah, viognier and grenache are grown using various organic practices to improve soil health and sequester carbon. Michael Alberty | For The Oregonian/oregonlive, oregonlive, 11 Oct. 2021 What about carbon mitigation strategies, including technologies that draw carbon dioxide out of the atmosphere and sequester it deep underground? Don Lincoln, CNN, 6 Oct. 2021 An international campaign to plant 1 trillion trees across the globe this decade aims to bolster the planet’s current stock of roughly 3 trillion trees and sequester more than 200 gigatons of greenhouse gas. San Diego Union-Tribune, 19 Sep. 2021 The home ranges of Indigenous peoples currently shelter 80 percent of Earth's remaining biodiversity and sequester almost 300 trillion tons of carbon. The Editors, Scientific American, 9 Sep. 2021 From living there to recording there, how did sequester within your desert environs inspire Hardware? Jim Ryan, Forbes, 18 June 2021 His plan is elegantly simple: permanently sequester contaminated sediments in artificial islands. Brian Maffly, The Salt Lake Tribune, 8 Sep. 2021 The sequester pared gross domestic product by 1.2%. Michael Hiltzik, Los Angeles Times, 11 Aug. 2021 Thing is, for years, Congress has missed the targets and waived the sequester. Howard Gleckman, Forbes, 29 June 2021

These example sentences are selected automatically from various online news sources to reflect current usage of the word 'sequester.' Views expressed in the examples do not represent the opinion of Merriam-Webster or its editors. Send us feedback.

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First Known Use of sequester

Verb

14th century, in the meaning defined at sense 1a

Noun

1604, in the meaning defined at sense 2

History and Etymology for sequester

Verb

Middle English sequestren, from Anglo-French sequestrer, from Latin sequestrare to hand over to a trustee, from sequester third party to whom disputed property is entrusted, agent, from secus beside, otherwise; akin to Latin sequi to follow

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Time Traveler for sequester

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The first known use of sequester was in the 14th century

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Dictionary Entries Near sequester

sequential system

sequester

sequestrable

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Statistics for sequester

Last Updated

27 Oct 2021

Cite this Entry

“Sequester.” Merriam-Webster.com Dictionary, Merriam-Webster, https://www.merriam-webster.com/dictionary/sequester. Accessed 27 Oct. 2021.

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More Definitions for sequester

sequester

verb

English Language Learners Definition of sequester

: to keep (a person or group) apart from other people
: to take (property) until a debt has been paid

sequester

transitive verb
se·​ques·​ter | \ si-ˈkwes-tər How to pronounce sequester (audio) \

Medical Definition of sequester

 (Entry 1 of 2)

: to hold (as a metallic ion) in solution especially for the purpose of suppressing undesired chemical or biological activity

sequester

noun

Medical Definition of sequester (Entry 2 of 2)

sequester

transitive verb
se·​ques·​ter | \ si-ˈkwes-tər How to pronounce sequester (audio) \
sequestered; sequestering

Legal Definition of sequester

 (Entry 1 of 2)

1 : to place (as a jury or witness) in seclusion or isolation

Note: Juries are sequestered in order to preserve their impartiality. Witnesses are sequestered so that their testimony is not influenced by the testimony of prior witnesses.

2a : to seize especially by a writ of sequestration
b : to deposit (property) in sequestration

sequester

noun

Legal Definition of sequester (Entry 2 of 2)

History and Etymology for sequester

Transitive verb

Anglo-French sequestrer, from Middle French, from Latin sequestrare to hand over to a trustee, from sequester third party to whom disputed property is entrusted, agent, from secus beside, otherwise

More from Merriam-Webster on sequester

Nglish: Translation of sequester for Spanish Speakers

Britannica English: Translation of sequester for Arabic Speakers

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