scorn

noun
\ ˈskȯrn How to pronounce scorn (audio) \

Definition of scorn

 (Entry 1 of 2)

1 : open dislike and disrespect or mockery often mixed with indignation
2 : an expression of contempt or derision
3 : an object of extreme disdain, contempt, or derision : something contemptible

scorn

verb
\ ˈskȯrn How to pronounce scorn (audio) \
scorned; scorning; scorns

Definition of scorn (Entry 2 of 2)

transitive verb

: to treat with scorn : reject or dismiss as contemptible or unworthy scorned local traditions scorned to reply to the charge

intransitive verb

: to show disdain or derision : scoff

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Other Words from scorn

Verb

scorner noun

Choose the Right Synonym for scorn

Verb

despise, contemn, scorn, disdain mean to regard as unworthy of one's notice or consideration. despise may suggest an emotional response ranging from strong dislike to loathing. despises cowards contemn implies a vehement condemnation of a person or thing as low, vile, feeble, or ignominious. contemns the image of women promoted by advertisers scorn implies a ready or indignant contempt. scorns the very thought of retirement disdain implies an arrogant or supercilious aversion to what is regarded as unworthy. disdained popular music

Examples of scorn in a Sentence

Noun Unlike government censorship, this corruption eats at one of China's more beleaguered professions from within its ranks. The trading of favors for cash is so prevalent that, like the honest cop in a corrupt police unit, an ethical journalist risks the scorn of colleagues. — Gady A. Epstein, Forbes, 21 July 2008 He burns with generous indignation at the scorn with which many literary critics have treated Tolkien, and his subtitle, "author of the Century," is meant to provoke. But provocation is only one of his purposes. — Richard Jenkyns, New Republic, 28 Jan. 2002 Claiming their inalienable rights as teenagers, the two exercise an unmitigated scorn for all adults in the immediate vicinity … — B. Ruby Rich, Nation, 3 & 10 Sept. 2001 They treated his suggestion with scorn. an expression full of scorn Her political rivals have poured scorn on her ideas for improving the tax system. Verb My parents scorned packaged and ready-made foods. It did not matter that, at the time, our hometown was a test-market capital for these sorts of food products; my father still thought that convenience food was a Communist plot, and my mother insisted that only trashy people failed to practice a separation of food groups. — Molly O'Neill, Vogue, January 2007 A union member and activist since age 15, bound for an academic career at Cornell and NYU, Fitch, now past 65, writes like a lover scorned. — Rob Long, National Review, 13 Feb. 2006 Stung by attacks on his new Excursion—a 12.5-m.p.g. guzzler dubbed "Ford Valdez" by critics—he has expressed fears that auto companies could be scorned like tobacco companies if they don't clean up their act. Similarly, GM has sought to position itself as the greenest car company, beginning in 1996 when it launched the nation's first modern, mass-produced electric car, the EV-1. — Margot Roosevelt, Time, 14 Aug. 2000 He scorns anyone who earns less money than he does. Her actions were scorned by many people. They were scorned as fanatics.
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Recent Examples on the Web: Noun In between the ultraviolence and political scorn, Gunn’s love for his misfit characters shines through, stopping the entire exercise from feeling pointless and embittered. David Sims, The Atlantic, 5 Aug. 2021 Right on cue, right-wing voices like Tucker Carlson and Jesse Kelly mocked Dunn and other men who shared their emotions at the hearing, with special scorn reserved for Adam Schiff and Adam Kinzinger. Brian Stelter, CNN, 27 July 2021 Chinese officials reacted to NATO’s declaration with anger and scorn, accusing the alliance of recycling outdated Cold War strategies. BostonGlobe.com, 15 June 2021 Statements from finance officials highlight growing government concern, especially as figures such as Musk have shown their outsize influence over markets and, experts say, as prices swing wildly when influencers proclaim their excitement or scorn. Hamza Shaban, Anchorage Daily News, 18 May 2021 Statements from finance officials highlight growing government concern, especially as figures like Musk have shown their outsize influence over markets and, experts say, as prices swing wildly when influencers proclaim their excitement or scorn. Washington Post, 17 May 2021 Uber drivers are very low on the socio-economic totem pole, objects of both pity and scorn. Kevin D. Williamson, National Review, 13 May 2021 Another aspect of the Duran Duran story touched in the book is the band's relationship with its young and predominantly female fans during Duranmania—something that the usually older male rock critics looked upon with disdain and scorn. David Chiu, Forbes, 10 May 2021 Bauer tries to shrug off the scorn from strangers, but acknowledges her actions have angered some in her community. Michael Kunzelman, ajc, 28 July 2021 Recent Examples on the Web: Verb Seemingly casually, Donald Trump lobbed paper towels to people in Puerto Rico after a hurricane, generating scorn from critics but little damage to his political standing. BostonGlobe.com, 4 Sep. 2021 Seemingly casually, Donald Trump lobbed paper towels to people in Puerto Rico after a hurricane, generating scorn from critics but little damage to his political standing. Josh Boak, ajc, 4 Sep. 2021 Harvard’s refusal to divest its endowment from fossil fuels continues to draw scorn from across the country. Bill Mckibben, The New Yorker, 21 July 2021 Meanwhile, Cheney is under mounting criticism and scorn from Republicans over her statements regarding the former president. Savannah Behrmann, USA TODAY, 5 May 2021 As president, Trump casually lobbed paper towels to people in Puerto Rico after Hurricane Maria’s devastation in 2017, generating scorn from critics but little damage to his political standing. Aamer Madhani And Darlene Superville, Anchorage Daily News, 7 Sep. 2021 The oppositional approach to mask mandates by the Republican governors has earned them scorn and derision by the media and the Democratic Party, who argue their policies have prolonged the COVID-19 pandemic. Jessica Chasmar, Fox News, 23 Aug. 2021 But heap scorn on the People of Praise and you’ll regret it. Dave Boucher, Detroit Free Press, 10 Aug. 2021 The White House declined comment Thursday, but the industry turnaround on carbon pricing was met with doubt among some environmentalists and scorn from congressional Republicans. Matthew Brown, Fortune, 26 Mar. 2021

These example sentences are selected automatically from various online news sources to reflect current usage of the word 'scorn.' Views expressed in the examples do not represent the opinion of Merriam-Webster or its editors. Send us feedback.

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First Known Use of scorn

Noun

13th century, in the meaning defined at sense 1

Verb

13th century, in the meaning defined at transitive sense

History and Etymology for scorn

Noun and Verb

Middle English, from Anglo-French escharne, escar, of Germanic origin; akin to Old High German scern jest

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Time Traveler for scorn

Time Traveler

The first known use of scorn was in the 13th century

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Dictionary Entries Near scorn

scorious

scorn

scornful

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Statistics for scorn

Last Updated

9 Sep 2021

Cite this Entry

“Scorn.” Merriam-Webster.com Dictionary, Merriam-Webster, https://www.merriam-webster.com/dictionary/scorn. Accessed 25 Sep. 2021.

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More Definitions for scorn

scorn

noun

English Language Learners Definition of scorn

 (Entry 1 of 2)

: a feeling that someone or something is not worthy of any respect or approval
: harsh criticism that shows a lack of respect or approval for someone or something

scorn

verb

English Language Learners Definition of scorn (Entry 2 of 2)

: to show that you think (someone or something) is not worthy of respect or approval : to feel or express scorn for (someone or something)
: to refuse or reject (someone or something that you do not think is worthy of respect or approval)

scorn

noun
\ ˈskȯrn How to pronounce scorn (audio) \

Kids Definition of scorn

 (Entry 1 of 2)

1 : a strong feeling of disgust and anger I have nothing but scorn for cheaters.
2 : an expression of disgust and anger They poured scorn on the idea.

scorn

verb
scorned; scorning

Kids Definition of scorn (Entry 2 of 2)

: to show disgust and anger for

More from Merriam-Webster on scorn

Nglish: Translation of scorn for Spanish Speakers

Britannica English: Translation of scorn for Arabic Speakers

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