scoop

1 of 2

noun

1
a
: a large ladle
b
: a deep shovel or similar implement for digging, dipping, or shoveling
c
: a usually hemispherical utensil for dipping food
d
: a small spoon-shaped utensil or instrument for cutting or gouging
2
a
: the action of scooping
b
: the amount contained by a scoop
3
a
: a hollow place : cavity
b
: a part forming or surrounding an opening for channeling a fluid (such as air) into a desired path
4
a
: information especially of immediate interest
5
: a rounded and usually low-cut neckline on a woman's garment

called also scoop neck

scoopful noun

scoop

2 of 2

verb

scooped; scooping; scoops

transitive verb

1
a
: to take out or up with or as if with a scoop : dip
b
: to pick up quickly or surreptitiously with or as if with a sweep of the hand
often used with up
scoop up the treat
2
: to empty by ladling out the contents
3
: to make hollow : dig out
4
: beat sense 5a(2)
scooped the rival newspaper
scoopable adjective
scooper noun

Examples of scoop in a Sentence

Noun a backhoe with a large scoop The story turned out to be the political scoop of the year. She always knows the scoop. Here's the scoop on how to clean leather. Verb She has a job scooping ice cream. He scooped flour into the bowl. A backhoe was scooping dirt from the hole. The children scooped handfuls of marbles from the pile. He scooped the dice off the table and rolled again. Scoop a hole in the dough for the filling. The city's biggest newspaper got scooped by a weekly paper that released the story a full day before. See More
Recent Examples on the Web
Noun
Such a journalistic scoop ought to be an open-and-shut case: publish, expose, let the authorities take action. Catherine Bray, Variety, 17 Feb. 2024 Spread a spoonful of strawberry jam on the bottom, then plop a generous scoop of strawberry ice cream on top. Carly Westerfield, Bon Appétit, 7 Feb. 2024 Serve it with a scoop of ice cream to take it over the top. Southern Living Editors, Southern Living, 1 Feb. 2024 Newsletter Get the lowdown on L.A. politics Sign up for our L.A. City Hall newsletter to get weekly insights, scoops and analysis. Los Angeles Times Staff, Los Angeles Times, 1 Feb. 2024 The artisan ice-cream company serves up scoops with a variety of flavors (dairy-free included). Katie Toussaint, Charlotte Observer, 31 Jan. 2024 Her split requires a scoop each of vanilla, strawberry and chocolate and a sprinkling of peanuts. Jill Wendholt Silva, Kansas City Star, 31 Jan. 2024 Braud’s funnel cakes are elevated and garnished with scoops of ice cream and toppings. Dominique Fluker, Essence, 6 Feb. 2024 This skillet cookie should be served warm with a hefty scoop of vanilla ice cream. Southern Living Editors, Southern Living, 5 Feb. 2024
Verb
What distinguishes the content on Food Is Stupid from today’s viral rage-bait recipes like TikTok tabletop nachos and ice cream sundaes scooped into toilet bowls is Lee’s methodology. Adam Reiner, Bon Appétit, 6 Jan. 2024 The main ingredient was a mug full of snow scooped off what appeared to be a grill on the deck of her house, which was coated in a layer of the white stuff, thanks to the rare winter storm that had just blown through her hometown of Nashville. Emily Heil, Washington Post, 22 Jan. 2024 Her small team of young women have larger bowls and are no longer scooping cookie dough by hand or fighting for space in the kitchen freezer. Matti Gellman, Kansas City Star, 19 Jan. 2024 Talanoa Hufanga scooped it up and ran 6 yards for the touchdown. Jerry McDonald, The Mercury News, 16 Jan. 2024 Which raises the question: How did Drunk Elephant end up on Christmas lists for kids who believe Santa’s elves are scooping globs of Protini Polypeptide Cream into neon blue jars? Ariana Yaptangco, Glamour, 10 Jan. 2024 While cabs line up at the taxi stand, rideshare drivers will scoop you up from the passenger pickup area. Cailey Rizzo, Travel + Leisure, 10 Jan. 2024 Able scooped the ball and powered up the left side of the court wearing three defenders. Sam Cohn, Baltimore Sun, 4 Jan. 2024 Early humans likely scooped red clay from the cave’s floor and walls, mixing it with water at their feet. Sonja Anderson, Smithsonian Magazine, 5 Jan. 2024 See More

These examples are programmatically compiled from various online sources to illustrate current usage of the word 'scoop.' Any opinions expressed in the examples do not represent those of Merriam-Webster or its editors. Send us feedback about these examples.

Word History

Etymology

Noun

Middle English scope, from Middle Dutch schope; akin to Old High German skepfen to shape — more at shape

First Known Use

Noun

14th century, in the meaning defined at sense 1a

Verb

14th century, in the meaning defined at sense 1a

Time Traveler
The first known use of scoop was in the 14th century

Dictionary Entries Near scoop

Cite this Entry

“Scoop.” Merriam-Webster.com Dictionary, Merriam-Webster, https://www.merriam-webster.com/dictionary/scoop. Accessed 23 Feb. 2024.

Kids Definition

scoop

1 of 2 noun
1
a
: a large shovel (as for shoveling coal)
b
: a tool or utensil shaped like a shovel for digging into a soft substance and lifting out a portion
c
: a round utensil with a handle for dipping out soft food (as ice cream)
d
: a small tool for cutting or gouging
2
: an act or the action of scooping : a motion made with or as if with a scoop
3
a
: the amount held by a scoop
a scoop of ice cream
b
: a hole made by scooping
4
a
: information of immediate interest
what's the scoop
b
: the reporting of a news story ahead of competitors
scoopful noun

scoop

2 of 2 verb
1
: to take out or up with or as if with a scoop
2
: to make hollow
3
: to report a news story ahead of
scooper noun

Medical Definition

scoop

noun
: a spoon-shaped surgical instrument used in extracting various materials (as pus or foreign bodies)

More from Merriam-Webster on scoop

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