relinquish

verb
re·​lin·​quish | \ ri-ˈliŋ-kwish How to pronounce relinquish (audio) , -ˈlin- \
relinquished; relinquishing; relinquishes

Definition of relinquish

transitive verb

1 : to withdraw or retreat from : leave behind
2 : give up relinquish a title
3a : to stop holding physically : release slowly relinquished his grip on the bar
b : to give over possession or control of : yield few leaders willingly relinquish power

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Other Words from relinquish

relinquishment \ ri-​ˈliŋ-​kwish-​mənt How to pronounce relinquish (audio) , -​ˈlin-​ \ noun

Choose the Right Synonym for relinquish

relinquish, yield, resign, surrender, abandon, waive mean to give up completely. relinquish usually does not imply strong feeling but may suggest some regret, reluctance, or weakness. relinquished her crown yield implies concession or compliance or submission to force. the troops yielded ground grudgingly resign emphasizes voluntary relinquishment or sacrifice without struggle. resigned her position surrender implies a giving up after a struggle to retain or resist. surrendered their claims abandon stresses finality and completeness in giving up. abandoned all hope waive implies conceding or forgoing with little or no compulsion. waived the right to a trial by jury

Examples of relinquish in a Sentence

They had turned to an open adoption after pursuing infertility treatments for 18 years, and the birth mother had agreed to relinquish custody at the hospital. — Emily Nussbaum, Discover, January 2000 In April of that year Albert Slyusar, one of the legendary figures of the Afghanistan war, had relinquished command of 103 Guards Airborne Division. — Carey Schofield, The Russian Elite, 1993 The feedback seems to operate on the premise that people who relinquish the civilized art of maintaining creative cities are not to be entrusted with the risks of developing further. — Jane Jacobs, Cities and the Wealth of Nations, (1984) 1985 The Major no sooner heard the voice, than he relinquished Mr Dombey's arm, darted forward, took the hand of the lady in the chair and pressed it to his lips. — Charles Dickens, Dombey and Son, 1848 I will not relinquish my rights. She was forced to relinquish control of the project. The court ordered him to relinquish custody of his child.
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Recent Examples on the Web It’s a surprising reversal that comes after the company appeared to back Richards to stick around behind-the-scenes after a series of controversies forced him to relinquish his role as the new Jeopardy! Jon Blistein, Rolling Stone, 31 Aug. 2021 In the play, the king has decided to relinquish his throne and wants to divide his kingdom among his three daughters. BostonGlobe.com, 24 June 2021 Bills have been introduced in the Senate and House that aim to force the two big app stores to relinquish their virtual monopoly control over the app ecosystem. Todd Spangler, Variety, 10 Sep. 2021 Another $175 million will be contributed after the Sackler family members relinquish control of several charitable institutions. Ed Silverman, STAT, 5 Sep. 2021 Pro-life publications and organizations that coerce pregnant women to relinquish their unborn children cite an estimate of 36 waiting families for each child adopted. Js Lee, Health.com, 19 May 2021 Longenecker, 76, doesn’t seem ready to relinquish her leadership role just yet. San Diego Union-Tribune, 8 Aug. 2021 But countries like Russia, China and Iran continued backing the nation’s authoritarian leader, Nicolás Maduro, who refused to relinquish power. New York Times, 8 July 2021 After beating Oklahoma in the CFP semifinals, however, Watson and the Tigers ran into an Alabama team not ready to relinquish its place atop college football. Nathan Baird, cleveland, 31 Dec. 2020

These example sentences are selected automatically from various online news sources to reflect current usage of the word 'relinquish.' Views expressed in the examples do not represent the opinion of Merriam-Webster or its editors. Send us feedback.

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First Known Use of relinquish

15th century, in the meaning defined at sense 1

History and Etymology for relinquish

Middle English relinquisshen, from Anglo-French relinquiss-, stem of relinquir, from Latin relinquere to leave behind, from re- + linquere to leave — more at loan

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Time Traveler for relinquish

Time Traveler

The first known use of relinquish was in the 15th century

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Dictionary Entries Near relinquish

relinquent

relinquish

reliquary

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Statistics for relinquish

Last Updated

4 Oct 2021

Cite this Entry

“Relinquish.” Merriam-Webster.com Dictionary, Merriam-Webster, https://www.merriam-webster.com/dictionary/relinquish. Accessed 20 Oct. 2021.

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More Definitions for relinquish

relinquish

verb

English Language Learners Definition of relinquish

: to give up (something) : to give (something, such as power, control, or possession) to another person or group

relinquish

verb
re·​lin·​quish | \ ri-ˈliŋ-kwish How to pronounce relinquish (audio) \
relinquished; relinquishing

Kids Definition of relinquish

: to let go of : give up "She's not the type to relinquish her new powers."— Avi, Crispin: The Cross of Lead

More from Merriam-Webster on relinquish

Nglish: Translation of relinquish for Spanish Speakers

Britannica English: Translation of relinquish for Arabic Speakers

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