recede

verb (1)
re·​cede | \ ri-ˈsēd How to pronounce recede (audio) \
receded; receding

Definition of recede

 (Entry 1 of 2)

intransitive verb

1a : to move back or away : withdraw a receding hairline
b : to slant backward
2 : to grow less or smaller : diminish, decrease a receding deficit

recede

verb (2)
re·​cede | \ (ˌ)rē-ˈsēd How to pronounce recede (audio) \
receded; receding; recedes

Definition of recede (Entry 2 of 2)

transitive verb

: to cede back to a former possessor

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Choose the Right Synonym for recede

Verb (1)

recede, retreat, retract, back mean to move backward. recede implies a gradual withdrawing from a forward or high fixed point in time or space. the flood waters gradually receded retreat implies withdrawal from a point or position reached. retreating soldiers retract implies drawing back from an extended position. a cat retracting its claws back is used with up, down, out, or off to refer to any retrograde motion. backed off on the throttle

Examples of recede in a Sentence

Recent Examples on the Web: Verb Planted by the hundreds, bulbs can hold an entire area of landscape, then recede to let other plants step onto the stage. Washington Post, 21 Sep. 2021 The shooting touched off protests and violence that have generated a flood of investigations, charges and lawsuits unlikely to recede any time soon. Bruce Vielmetti, jsonline.com, 19 Aug. 2021 The loss of a few feet in depth can cause the lake to recede more than 100 feet from beaches and docks. Greg Stanley, Star Tribune, 31 July 2021 Rescuers were able to reach the train when the water began to recede around 9 p.m., people who were there said. New York Times, 25 Sep. 2021 Assuming that no one got hurt and there was no collision of any kind, the chances are that this instance would eventually recede in your memory banks. Lance Eliot, Forbes, 8 Sep. 2021 Birds decompose on the expanding shore of the Great Salt Lake on Saturday, July 10, 2021, as extreme drought conditions recede the water line to an unprecedented level. Sean P. Means, The Salt Lake Tribune, 1 Aug. 2021 The heavy rain that caused the flooding Saturday will recede. Frank Witsil, Detroit Free Press, 27 June 2021 The most likely outcome, though, is that the bad headlines will recede and a new, lower bar for evidence will be set. Benjamin Mazer, The Atlantic, 13 July 2021 Recent Examples on the Web: Verb The shooting touched off protests and violence that have generated a flood of investigations, charges and lawsuits unlikely to recede any time soon. Bruce Vielmetti, jsonline.com, 19 Aug. 2021 The heavy rain that caused the flooding Saturday will recede. Frank Witsil, Detroit Free Press, 27 June 2021 The eviction moratorium will push some of those problems into the spring, when the pandemic is expected to recede as the pace of vaccinations increases. New York Times, 1 Jan. 2021 Oaks that are common in western and southwestern Minnesota are likely to migrate north, while the pines of the boreal forest in northeastern Minnesota are likely to recede north and perhaps disappear from the state entirely. Dave Braunger, Star Tribune, 3 Feb. 2019 Planted by the hundreds, bulbs can hold an entire area of landscape, then recede to let other plants step onto the stage. Washington Post, 21 Sep. 2021 Assuming that no one got hurt and there was no collision of any kind, the chances are that this instance would eventually recede in your memory banks. Lance Eliot, Forbes, 8 Sep. 2021 Her body … had come to rest upon a log after the water started to recede a bit. Correspondent Maureen Maher, CBS News, 21 Aug. 2021 The loss of a few feet in depth can cause the lake to recede more than 100 feet from beaches and docks. Greg Stanley, Star Tribune, 31 July 2021

These example sentences are selected automatically from various online news sources to reflect current usage of the word 'recede.' Views expressed in the examples do not represent the opinion of Merriam-Webster or its editors. Send us feedback.

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First Known Use of recede

Verb (1)

15th century, in the meaning defined at sense 1a

Verb (2)

1771, in the meaning defined above

History and Etymology for recede

Verb (1)

Middle English, from Latin recedere to go back, from re- + cedere to go

Verb (2)

re- + cede

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Time Traveler for recede

Time Traveler

The first known use of recede was in the 15th century

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Dictionary Entries Near recede

recce

recede

recedence

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Statistics for recede

Last Updated

12 Oct 2021

Cite this Entry

“Recede.” Merriam-Webster.com Dictionary, Merriam-Webster, https://www.merriam-webster.com/dictionary/recede. Accessed 20 Oct. 2021.

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More Definitions for recede

recede

verb
re·​cede | \ ri-ˈsēd How to pronounce recede (audio) \
receded; receding

Kids Definition of recede

1 : to move back or away Floodwaters are receding.
2 : to become smaller or weaker … I heard … footsteps receding.— Avi, Crispin: The Cross of Lead

More from Merriam-Webster on recede

Thesaurus: All synonyms and antonyms for recede

Nglish: Translation of recede for Spanish Speakers

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