prop

1 of 6

noun (1)

: something that props or sustains : support

prop

2 of 6

verb

propped; propping

transitive verb

1
a
: to support by placing something under or against
often used with up
b
: to support by placing against something
2
: sustain, strengthen
often used with up
a government propped up by the military

prop

3 of 6

noun (2)

1
: property sense 3
stage props
2
: something used in creating or enhancing a desired effect
buy books … as cultural props because they want to appear literateJohn Powers

prop

4 of 6

noun (3)

prop

5 of 6

abbreviation

prop-

6 of 6

combining form

: related to propionic acid
propane
propyl

Examples of prop in a Sentence

Verb She propped the rake against a tree. We propped the shed's roof with poles. The window was propped open.
Recent Examples on the Web
Verb
Excavators have heaped rubble at the base of the Uranus Building, to prop it up. Wayne Chang, CNN, 5 Apr. 2024 The Russian leader continues to draw on a broad base among ordinary Russians—support built over nearly a quarter century that can prop him up even if many of these backers sour on the war itself. Timothy Frye, Foreign Affairs, 25 Mar. 2024 But a flurry of regional bank failures could have just as big an impact as the failure of a single large one, and the Fed might be motivated to step in and prop them up to contain the ripple effects. Dylan Sloan, Fortune, 14 Mar. 2024 By the dance floor, Christopher Nolan and his entourage sit at a zebra-print booth, with three Oscars propped on their table. Michael Schulman, The New Yorker, 11 Mar. 2024 According to officials, the women are accused of taking Layman's body out of the home and propping him up in the passenger seat of their car with the help of a third unidentified individual, and driving through a bank drive-thru to withdraw around $900. Landon Mion, Fox News, 9 Mar. 2024 The tall, skinny windows were propped open with umbrellas, and inside smelled like math textbooks. Frederick Kaufman, Harper's Magazine, 26 Feb. 2024 The book is propped wide open, and engraved on its surface are the names of more than a hundred and twenty thousand Black people, documented in the 1870 census, who were emancipated after the Civil War. Doreen St. Félix, The New Yorker, 25 Mar. 2024 There’s an integrated kickstand to prop your phone up, too. Quentyn Kennemer, The Verge, 21 Mar. 2024
Noun
According to the lot listing, prop designers created the floating wood panel based on a piece of debris salvaged from the wreckage in 1912. Sarah Kuta, Smithsonian Magazine, 29 Mar. 2024 The prop is modeled on a real-life structure The 8-foot-long, 41-inch-wide floating hunk of wood is made of balsa and intricately carved with rococo motifs like floral accents and scrolling curves, according to the auction house. Rachel Treisman, NPR, 28 Mar. 2024 The slow bounce back post-strike has already impacted small businesses that depend on the steady flow of Hollywood production for revenue, including local prop houses, florists, marketing agencies, drivers and dry cleaners. Anthony De Leon, Los Angeles Times, 26 Mar. 2024 Reportedly, there have been two specific games in which DraftKings Sportsbook flagged prop bets involving Porter in its daily betting insights. Kevin Dotson, CNN, 26 Mar. 2024 The prop found a new home on March 23 during a Heritage Auctions sale featuring 1,600 Hollywood artifacts from Planet Hollywood resorts and restaurants. Sarah Kuta, Smithsonian Magazine, 29 Mar. 2024 Some of the most iconic props in Hollywood history hit the auction block last week, from Indiana Jones' trusty whip to Forrest Gump's assorted chocolates to the infamous ax from The Shining. Rachel Treisman, NPR, 28 Mar. 2024 But prop bets have drawn outsized attention—both good and bad. Dylan Sloan, Fortune, 28 Mar. 2024 For all the interest the panel has inspired from a fictional story, the prop itself is based on a real-life Titanic artifact. Kim Bellware, Washington Post, 27 Mar. 2024

These examples are programmatically compiled from various online sources to illustrate current usage of the word 'prop.' Any opinions expressed in the examples do not represent those of Merriam-Webster or its editors. Send us feedback about these examples.

Word History

Etymology

Noun (1)

Middle English proppe, from Middle Dutch, stopper; akin to Middle Low German proppe stopper

Combining form

International Scientific Vocabulary, from propionic (acid)

First Known Use

Noun (1)

15th century, in the meaning defined above

Verb

1507, in the meaning defined at sense 1a

Noun (2)

1841, in the meaning defined at sense 1

Noun (3)

1914, in the meaning defined above

Time Traveler
The first known use of prop was in the 15th century

Dictionary Entries Near prop

Cite this Entry

“Prop.” Merriam-Webster.com Dictionary, Merriam-Webster, https://www.merriam-webster.com/dictionary/prop. Accessed 20 Apr. 2024.

Kids Definition

prop

1 of 4 noun
: something that props or supports

prop

2 of 4 verb
propped; propping
1
a
: to hold up or keep from falling or slipping by placing a support under or against
prop up a broken chair
b
: to support by placing against something
propped the rake against a tree
2
: to give help, encouragement, or support to
propped up by his faith in times of crisis

prop

3 of 4 noun

prop

4 of 4 noun

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