proclaim

verb
pro·​claim | \ prō-ˈklām How to pronounce proclaim (audio) , prə- \
proclaimed; proclaiming; proclaims

Definition of proclaim

transitive verb

1a : to declare publicly, typically insistently, proudly, or defiantly and in either speech or writing : announce
b : to give outward indication of : show his manner proclaimed his genteel upbringing
2 : to declare or declare to be solemnly, officially, or formally proclaim an amnesty proclaim the country a republic
3 : to praise or glorify openly or publicly : extol proclaimed the rescue workers' efforts

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Other Words from proclaim

proclaimer noun

Choose the Right Synonym for proclaim

declare, announce, proclaim, promulgate mean to make known publicly. declare implies explicitness and usually formality in making known. the referee declared the contest a draw announce implies the declaration of something for the first time. announced their engagement at a party proclaim implies declaring clearly, forcefully, and authoritatively. the president proclaimed a national day of mourning promulgate implies the proclaiming of a dogma, doctrine, or law. promulgated an edict of religious toleration

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The pro- in proclaim means "forward, out", so a proclamation is an "outward" statement intended for the public. We often think of proclamations as something issued by monarchs or dictators, but Lincoln was able to issue his Emancipation Proclamation because as president he had the power to free the slaves in certain areas. At a slightly lower level, a governor may proclaim a day in honor of the state's firemen, a movie critic may proclaim a director to be the best of all, or you may proclaim your New Year's resolutions to a crowd of friends.

Examples of proclaim in a Sentence

She proclaimed that she will run for governor. The President proclaimed a national day of mourning. He took command of the government and proclaimed himself emperor. The magazine proclaimed him to be the best player in baseball. He proclaimed his love for her in a poem. His behavior proclaimed his good upbringing.
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Recent Examples on the Web Leading diplomats have flown around the world to proclaim the seriousness of America’s commitment. Robinson Meyer, The Atlantic, 16 Oct. 2021 For many of the nominees, the Tonys also represent the chance to proclaim their own values and call out the things that need to change. Gordon Cox, Variety, 24 Sep. 2021 Everyone agreed, leading Probst to point to the camera and proclaim the matter decided. Dalton Ross, EW.com, 23 Sep. 2021 No one wants to fail—even those who proudly proclaim their failures. Expert Panel®, Forbes, 8 Sep. 2021 In 2000, President Bill Clinton visited the trail to proclaim the creation of the national monument. Kurtis Alexander, San Francisco Chronicle, 29 Sep. 2021 Six of Connecticut’s major nonprofit performing arts centers have formed a coalition to promote their work, spread awareness of COVID safety protocols and share resources to proclaim live entertainment is back. Christopher Arnott, courant.com, 28 Sep. 2021 Governments across Europe and particularly in Britain have been beating their breasts to proclaim their commitment to all things green. Neil Winton, Forbes, 14 Sep. 2021 Lamar, 34, dismissed the claims and posted a video on the Instagram account of Top Dawg CEO, Anthony Tiffith, to proclaim his loyalty. Melissa Ruggieri, USA TODAY, 20 Aug. 2021

These example sentences are selected automatically from various online news sources to reflect current usage of the word 'proclaim.' Views expressed in the examples do not represent the opinion of Merriam-Webster or its editors. Send us feedback.

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First Known Use of proclaim

14th century, in the meaning defined at sense 1a

History and Etymology for proclaim

Middle English proclamen, from Anglo-French or Latin; Anglo-French proclamer, from Latin proclamare, from pro- before + clamare to cry out — more at pro-, claim

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Time Traveler for proclaim

Time Traveler

The first known use of proclaim was in the 14th century

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Dictionary Entries Near proclaim

prock

proclaim

proclamation

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Statistics for proclaim

Last Updated

19 Oct 2021

Cite this Entry

“Proclaim.” Merriam-Webster.com Dictionary, Merriam-Webster, https://www.merriam-webster.com/dictionary/proclaim. Accessed 27 Oct. 2021.

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More Definitions for proclaim

proclaim

verb

English Language Learners Definition of proclaim

: to say or state (something) in a public, official, or definite way : to declare or announce (something)
: to show (something) clearly

proclaim

verb
pro·​claim | \ prō-ˈklām How to pronounce proclaim (audio) \
proclaimed; proclaiming

Kids Definition of proclaim

: to announce publicly : declare The president proclaimed a holiday.

proclaim

transitive verb
pro·​claim | \ prō-ˈklām How to pronounce proclaim (audio) \

Legal Definition of proclaim

: to declare or declare to be solemnly, officially, or formally proclaim an amnesty

More from Merriam-Webster on proclaim

Nglish: Translation of proclaim for Spanish Speakers

Britannica English: Translation of proclaim for Arabic Speakers

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