ode

1 of 2

noun

plural odes
1
: a lyric poem usually marked by exaltation of feeling and style, varying length of line, and complexity of stanza forms
Keats's ode "To a Nightingale"
2
: something that shows respect for or celebrates the worth or influence of another : homage
The museum would be an ode to visual storytelling, drawn from the director's collection of film ephemera and fine art.Chanan Tigay
The recipe is an ode to my homeland, Vietnam, and I'd like to share it with my new friends in America.Gourmet
odist noun

-ode

2 of 2

noun combining form

1
: way : path
electrode
2
: electrode
diode

Examples of ode in a Sentence

Noun This poem is titled, “An Ode to My Mother.”
Recent Examples on the Web
Noun
The segment served as the official introduction to Super Bowl 2024 as both an ode to the NFL stars, and to Las Vegas — the 2024 host city. Kelly Wynne, Peoplemag, 12 Feb. 2024 Every marketing opportunity, including the Bergdorf windows, which have been transformed into odes to the black and white ball. Chloe Malle, Vogue, 12 Feb. 2024 Fallston’s Visor is its newest addition, started by the current team in an ode to Woods, who often sports a visor during practice. Sam Cohn, Baltimore Sun, 9 Feb. 2024 Toby Keith, a former rodeo hand, oil rigger and semipro football player who became a rowdy king of country music, singing patriotic anthems, wry drinking songs and propulsive odes to cowboy culture that collectively sold more than 40 million records, died Feb. 5 at 62. Washington Post Staff, Washington Post, 6 Feb. 2024 An ode to jazz The festival kicks off Feb. 4 with an interactive family-friendly jazz concert conducted by New World Symphony fellow Molly Turner. Amanda Rosa, Miami Herald, 1 Feb. 2024 Chanel Creative Director of Chanel, Virginie Viard revisited the feminine ribbons in which Coco Chanel snipped in an ode to balletcore. Essence, 26 Jan. 2024 His take on the Corpse Reviver No. 2 cocktail is a tongue-tingling ode to impending summer. Judy Revenaugh, Kansas City Star, 30 Jan. 2024 The museum’s ode to the unicorn will feature manuscripts, paintings, coins, sculptures, illustrations, tapestries and even shop signs. Sonja Anderson, Smithsonian Magazine, 25 Jan. 2024 See More

These examples are programmatically compiled from various online sources to illustrate current usage of the word 'ode.' Any opinions expressed in the examples do not represent those of Merriam-Webster or its editors. Send us feedback about these examples.

Word History

Etymology

Noun

Middle French or Late Latin; Middle French, from Late Latin, from Greek ōidē, literally, song, from aeidein, aidein to sing; akin to Greek audē voice

Noun combining form

Greek -odos, from hodos

First Known Use

Noun

1538, in the meaning defined at sense 1

Time Traveler
The first known use of ode was in 1538

Dictionary Entries Near ode

Cite this Entry

“Ode.” Merriam-Webster.com Dictionary, Merriam-Webster, https://www.merriam-webster.com/dictionary/ode. Accessed 23 Feb. 2024.

Kids Definition

ode

1 of 2 noun
: a lyric poem that expresses a noble feeling with dignity

-ode

2 of 2 noun combining form
ˌōd
1
: way : path
electrode
2
: electrode
diode
Etymology

Noun combining form

derived from Greek hodos "way, path"

Last Updated: - Updated example sentences
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