objective

adjective
ob·​jec·​tive | \ əb-ˈjek-tiv How to pronounce objective (audio) , äb- \

Definition of objective

 (Entry 1 of 2)

1a : expressing or dealing with facts or conditions as perceived without distortion by personal feelings, prejudices, or interpretations objective art an objective history of the war an objective judgment
b of a test : limited to choices of fixed alternatives and reducing subjective factors to a minimum Each question on the objective test requires the selection of the correct answer from among several choices.
2a : of, relating to, or being an object, phenomenon, or condition in the realm of sensible experience independent of individual thought and perceptible by all observers : having reality independent of the mind objective reality … our reveries … are significantly and repeatedly shaped by our transactions with the objective world.— Marvin Reznikoff — compare subjective sense 3a
b : involving or deriving from sense perception or experience with actual objects, conditions, or phenomena objective awareness objective data
c of a symptom of disease : perceptible to persons other than the affected individual objective arthritis — compare subjective sense 4c
d : relating to or existing as an object of thought without consideration of independent existence used chiefly in medieval philosophy
3 : relating to, characteristic of, or constituting the case of words that follow prepositions or transitive verbs The pronoun her is in the objective case in the sentence "I saw her."

objective

noun
ob·​jec·​tive | \ əb-ˈjek-tiv How to pronounce objective (audio) , äb- \

Definition of objective (Entry 2 of 2)

1a : something toward which effort is directed : an aim, goal, or end of action
b : a strategic position to be attained or a purpose to be achieved by a military operation
2 : a lens or system of lenses that forms an image of an object

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Other Words from objective

Adjective

objectiveness noun

Choose the Right Synonym for objective

Adjective

material, physical, corporeal, phenomenal, sensible, objective mean of or belonging to actuality. material implies formation out of tangible matter; used in contrast with spiritual or ideal it may connote the mundane, crass, or grasping. material values physical applies to what is perceived directly by the senses and may contrast with mental, spiritual, or imaginary. the physical benefits of exercise corporeal implies having the tangible qualities of a body such as shape, size, or resistance to force. artists have portrayed angels as corporeal beings phenomenal applies to what is known or perceived through the senses rather than by intuition or rational deduction. scientists concerned with the phenomenal world sensible stresses the capability of readily or forcibly impressing the senses. the earth's rotation is not sensible to us objective may stress material or independent existence apart from a subject perceiving it. no objective evidence of damage

fair, just, equitable, impartial, unbiased, dispassionate, objective mean free from favor toward either or any side. fair implies a proper balance of conflicting interests. a fair decision just implies an exact following of a standard of what is right and proper. a just settlement of territorial claims equitable implies a less rigorous standard than just and usually suggests equal treatment of all concerned. the equitable distribution of the property impartial stresses an absence of favor or prejudice. an impartial third party unbiased implies even more strongly an absence of all prejudice. your unbiased opinion dispassionate suggests freedom from the influence of strong feeling and often implies cool or even cold judgment. a dispassionate summation of the facts objective stresses a tendency to view events or persons as apart from oneself and one's own interest or feelings. I can't be objective about my own child

Noun

intention, intent, purpose, design, aim, end, object, objective, goal mean what one intends to accomplish or attain. intention implies little more than what one has in mind to do or bring about. announced his intention to marry intent suggests clearer formulation or greater deliberateness. the clear intent of the statute purpose suggests a more settled determination. being successful was her purpose in life design implies a more carefully calculated plan. the order of events came by accident, not design aim adds to these implications of effort directed toward attaining or accomplishing. her aim was to raise film to an art form end stresses the intended effect of action often in distinction or contrast to the action or means as such. willing to use any means to achieve his end object may equal end but more often applies to a more individually determined wish or need. his constant object was the achievement of pleasure objective implies something tangible and immediately attainable. their objective is to seize the oil fields goal suggests something attained only by prolonged effort and hardship. worked years to reach her goals

Examples of objective in a Sentence

Adjective For no matter how objective Server tries to appear in detailing the highs and lows of her 67 years—the three marriages, the numerous affairs, the binges, the nightlong cruising of low-life byways and bordellos, the mainly poor movies she was in—he cannot really hide his essential fondness for her. — Peter Bogdanovich, New York Times Book Review, 23 Apr. 2006 I'm not going to read the history about it while I'm alive because I don't trust short-term history. Most historians wouldn't have voted for me, so I don't think they can write an objective history. — George W. Bush, quoted in Time, 6 Sept. 2004 "I'm not really a Hollywood person," said Mr. [Clint] Eastwood, who lives mostly in Carmel. "Not that I don't like L.A., but I'm just a Northern California guy. And it's very hard to be objective about what you're doing in a town that's all consumed by the entertainment business." — Bernard Weinraub, New York Times, 6 Aug. 1992 We need someone outside the company to give us an objective analysis. an objective assessment based solely upon the results of the experiment Noun The first objective of the low-intensity war was to "bleed" India so that it would cut its losses and quit. — Pervez Hoodbhoy, Prospect, June 2003 The Orange Plan assumed an early Japanese capture of the Philippines, and made relief of the Philippines the main U.S. objective. — David M. Kennedy, Atlantic, March 1999 The President had largely stuck to his publicly stated goals—though the objective of smashing Iraq's military machine hadn't been so clear. — Elizabeth Drew, New Yorker, 6 May 1991 … their primary objective is not the enrollment of new voters but changing the party affiliation of old voters … — Lawrence King, Commonweal, 9 Oct. 1970 The main objective of the class is to teach basic typing skills. She's expanding the business with the objective of improving efficiency. We've set specific objectives for each day.
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Recent Examples on the Web: Adjective Benchmarking substitutes performance for pedigree, objective for subjective comparison , and insight (into internal, competitor, and industry norms and variations) for conjecture and speculation. Mark A. Cohen, Forbes, 4 Oct. 2021 While the rating system was created by the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers and is intended as an objective measure, officials stressed that methodology for street condition assessments can vary from city to city. David Garrick, San Diego Union-Tribune, 12 Sep. 2021 This requires fair, objective, and open methods of counting ballots and resolving disputes over their counting. Michael Waldman, Fortune, 6 June 2021 Even a member of the group that prepared the recommendations suggests that information agreed on by scientific consensus does not necessarily represent objective truth. Grant Currin, Scientific American, 27 Aug. 2021 And sometimes that's based in something that feels like objective truth, but a lot of their perceptions are also just colored at all times. Dalton Ross, EW.com, 23 Aug. 2021 Obfuscating the world’s best science is a disservice to readers who depend on objective information to make independent assessments in the face of a changing planet. WSJ, 22 Aug. 2021 It’s about an objective and thorough assessment to find the most efficient operating model and encourage top performance. Sophia Williams, Forbes, 20 May 2021 The sure shot way of exhibiting this value is that the results are objective and measurable. Ruchi Kulhari, Forbes, 10 Sep. 2021 Recent Examples on the Web: Noun Thus, their main objective is being an inspiring role model for their employees, demonstrating positive behavior and cultivating an environment where everyone feels safe and welcome. Heidi Lynne Kurter, Forbes, 1 Oct. 2021 Her objective is to appreciate what's often overlooked … that the products, the people that make them, and the communities that consume them, matter. CBS News, 29 Aug. 2021 Playing a 14th is always part of the long-term objective. Josh Newman, The Salt Lake Tribune, 18 Sep. 2021 That’s understandable when the immediate objective for most schools and parents is a flight from screens and return to traditional classrooms. Ryan Craig, Forbes, 17 Sep. 2021 Wolves’ preferred prey, elk, are abundant in this unit and currently well over the population management objective set by ODFW. Jayson Jacoby, oregonlive, 17 Sep. 2021 Post-Afghanistan, deterring China from a catastrophic invasion of Taiwan must be the Biden administration’s principal national security objective. Robert C. O’brien And Alexander B. Gray, WSJ, 15 Sep. 2021 South Florida medical experts said Monday that the central objective of policymakers should be shielding the public from infections. David Lyons, sun-sentinel.com, 13 Sep. 2021 Adams said Twitter is particularly important to accomplish the first objective. Lauryn Schroeder, San Diego Union-Tribune, 11 Sep. 2021

These example sentences are selected automatically from various online news sources to reflect current usage of the word 'objective.' Views expressed in the examples do not represent the opinion of Merriam-Webster or its editors. Send us feedback.

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First Known Use of objective

Adjective

1647, in the meaning defined at sense 2d

Noun

1835, in the meaning defined at sense 2

History and Etymology for objective

Adjective

borrowed from Medieval Latin objectīvus "considered in relation to its purpose, relating to an object of thought," from objectum "something presented to the mind, goal, aim" + Latin -īvus -ive — more at object entry 1

Noun

in sense 1 probably short for objective point "goal of a military operation"; in sense 2 noun derivative of objective, adjective, "nearest the object (of the parts of a lens in a telescope, microscope, etc.)," probably borrowed from French (in verre objectif "lens nearest the object") — more at objective entry 1

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Time Traveler for objective

Time Traveler

The first known use of objective was in 1647

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Dictionary Entries Near objective

objectivate

objective

objective complement

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Statistics for objective

Last Updated

8 Oct 2021

Cite this Entry

“Objective.” Merriam-Webster.com Dictionary, Merriam-Webster, https://www.merriam-webster.com/dictionary/objective. Accessed 18 Oct. 2021.

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More Definitions for objective

objective

adjective

English Language Learners Definition of objective

 (Entry 1 of 2)

: based on facts rather than feelings or opinions : not influenced by feelings
: existing outside of the mind : existing in the real world
: relating to nouns, noun phrases, or pronouns that are the objects of verbs or prepositions

objective

noun

English Language Learners Definition of objective (Entry 2 of 2)

: something you are trying to do or achieve : a goal or purpose

objective

adjective
ob·​jec·​tive | \ əb-ˈjek-tiv How to pronounce objective (audio) \

Kids Definition of objective

 (Entry 1 of 2)

1 : dealing with facts without allowing personal feelings to confuse them an objective report
2 : being or belonging to the case of a noun or pronoun that is an object of a transitive verb or a preposition
3 : being outside of the mind and independent of it

Other Words from objective

objectively adverb

objective

noun

Kids Definition of objective (Entry 2 of 2)

: purpose, goal Before you begin the experiment, state your objective.

objective

adjective
ob·​jec·​tive | \ əb-ˈjek-tiv, äb- How to pronounce objective (audio) \

Medical Definition of objective

 (Entry 1 of 2)

1 : of, relating to, or being an object, phenomenon, or condition in the realm of sensible experience independent of individual thought and perceptible by all observers objective reality
2 : perceptible to persons other than the affected individual an objective symptom of disease — compare subjective sense 2b

Other Words from objective

objectively adverb

objective

noun

Medical Definition of objective (Entry 2 of 2)

1 : a lens or system of lenses that forms an image of an object
2 : something toward which effort is directed

More from Merriam-Webster on objective

Nglish: Translation of objective for Spanish Speakers

Britannica English: Translation of objective for Arabic Speakers

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