nonchalant

adjective
non·​cha·​lant | \ ˌnän-shə-ˈlänt How to pronounce nonchalant (audio) ; ˈnän-shə-ˌlänt, -lənt \

Essential Meaning of nonchalant

: relaxed and calm in a way that shows that you do not care or are not worried about anything He was surprisingly nonchalant about winning the award. She faced the crowd with the nonchalant ease of an experienced speaker. The team may have been somewhat nonchalant at the beginning of the season, but they now know that they need to work hard.

Full Definition of nonchalant

: having an air of easy unconcern or indifference

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Choose the Right Synonym for nonchalant

cool, composed, collected, unruffled, imperturbable, nonchalant mean free from agitation or excitement. cool may imply calmness, deliberateness, or dispassionateness. kept a cool head composed implies freedom from agitation as a result of self-discipline or a sedate disposition. the composed pianist gave a flawless concert collected implies a concentration of mind that eliminates distractions especially in moments of crisis. the nurse stayed calm and collected unruffled suggests apparent serenity and poise in the face of setbacks or in the midst of excitement. harried but unruffled imperturbable implies coolness or assurance even under severe provocation. the speaker remained imperturbable despite the heckling nonchalant stresses an easy coolness of manner or casualness that suggests indifference or unconcern. a nonchalant driver

Frequently Asked Questions About nonchalant

Is chalant the opposite of nonchalant?

There is no word chalant in English. Nonchalant comes from an Old French word nonchaloir, meaning "to disregard." That word comes from non-, meaning "not," + chaloir, meaning "to concern." If you want a word that means the opposite of nonchalant, both concerned and interested can do the job.

Is nonchalant a bad or negative thing?

Nonchalant can be either negative or positive. The word describes someone who is relaxed and calm in a way that shows that they do not care or are not worried about something. If someone is nonchalant about another person's pain or trouble, the word has a definite negative connotation. But if someone successfully undertaking a difficult task is described as nonchalant, their calmness and relaxed manner can be admirable. If they fail in that task, however, the fact that they were nonchalant will likely be a criticism and explanation for their failure.

What does it mean when someone is nonchalant?

Someone who is nonchalant is relaxed and calm, either because they do not care about something or because they are not worried about something.

Examples of nonchalant in a Sentence

In those stories, we already find the qualities the world would come to know as "Kafkaesque": the nonchalant intrusion of the bizarre and horrible into everyday life, the subjection of ordinary people to an inscrutable fate. — Adam Kirsch, New York Times Book Review, 4 Jan. 2009 … watch his iron-backed posture as he rides a horse and listen to the nonchalant way in which, not barking but speaking he says "Fire" to the line of infantry, like someone asking for a light. — John Updike, New Yorker, 30 Sept. 2002 He and Anita (and an ancient, nonchalant Lhasa apso … ) live in a gated community, surrounded by high, vine-covered walls, redolent of Wrigley, that embrace a golf club and an attractive thicket of large houses … — Frank Deford, Sports Illustrated, 19 Mar. 2001 It was thrilling to watch them, the regulars, so nonchalant, so composed as they slipped from Senate cloakroom to Senate hideaway, sharing jokes with powerful men old enough to be their fathers. — Ward Just, New York Times Book Review, 28 May 1989 He was surprisingly nonchalant about winning the award. She faced the crowd with the nonchalant ease of an experienced speaker. The team may have been somewhat nonchalant at the beginning of the season, but they now know that they need to work hard.
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Recent Examples on the Web As ever, Chase has a gift for scripting nonchalant mobster dialogue that’s weighted with humor and tension, emphasizing the strange mix of egotistical masculinity and careful decorum that goes into being part of the Mafia. David Sims, The Atlantic, 28 Sep. 2021 There’s another scene that, decades ago, would have been a seduction — and is now a more nonchalant encounter between Bond and Nomi, an MI6 agent who turns out to have been assigned the code number…007. Owen Gleiberman, Variety, 28 Sep. 2021 After spending so many years devising ways to make point schemes and airline programs work to his advantage, Belkin admits to getting frustrated with those who are nonchalant about their miles. Tamara Hardingham-gill, CNN, 7 Sep. 2021 The surface of the pool was immaculately still, nary a wind ripple in sight, and Dr. Gould pulled out his phone to record the water scavenger beetle’s nonchalant ceiling crawl. New York Times, 26 July 2021 Its 460 pound-feet of torque arrive at only 1500 rpm, imbuing the 6272-pound behemoth with an air of nonchalant muscularity in real-world driving. Ezra Dyer, Car and Driver, 20 Aug. 2021 In some ways, investors’ nonchalant attitude makes sense given the company’s history. Charley Grant, WSJ, 16 Aug. 2021 Mecher remained nonchalant about his family being in the eye of the political storm. Scott Wartman, The Enquirer, 11 Aug. 2021 Lady Redesdale, a publicity-seeking anti-vaxxer and Hitler enthusiast, got a sympathetic makeover as the chicly nonchalant Aunt Sadie. Lesley M.m. Blume, Town & Country, 31 July 2021

These example sentences are selected automatically from various online news sources to reflect current usage of the word 'nonchalant.' Views expressed in the examples do not represent the opinion of Merriam-Webster or its editors. Send us feedback.

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First Known Use of nonchalant

circa 1734, in the meaning defined above

History and Etymology for nonchalant

French, from Old French, from present participle of nonchaloir to disregard, from non- + chaloir to concern, from Latin calēre to be warm — more at lee

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Time Traveler for nonchalant

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The first known use of nonchalant was circa 1734

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Last Updated

13 Oct 2021

Cite this Entry

“Nonchalant.” Merriam-Webster.com Dictionary, Merriam-Webster, https://www.merriam-webster.com/dictionary/nonchalant. Accessed 20 Oct. 2021.

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More Definitions for nonchalant

nonchalant

adjective
non·​cha·​lant | \ ˌnän-shə-ˈlänt How to pronounce nonchalant (audio) \

Kids Definition of nonchalant

: showing or having a relaxed manner free from concern or excitement He was surprisingly nonchalant about winning the award.

Other Words from nonchalant

nonchalantly \ -​ˈlänt-​lē \ adverb

More from Merriam-Webster on nonchalant

Nglish: Translation of nonchalant for Spanish Speakers

Britannica English: Translation of nonchalant for Arabic Speakers

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