nautical

adjective

nau·​ti·​cal ˈnȯ-ti-kəl How to pronounce nautical (audio)
ˈnä-
: of, relating to, or associated with seamen, navigation, or ships
a dictionary of nautical terms
nautical flags
nautical skills
nautically adverb

Example Sentences

a dictionary of nautical terms collected sextants and other antique nautical equipment
Recent Examples on the Web The missile appeared to have landed inside Japan’s exclusive economic zone, which extends about 200 nautical miles from the coast. Dasl Yoon, WSJ, 18 Nov. 2022 Tatoosh is no slouch on the seas, either, with a top speed of 19 knots and a range of nearly 6,855 nautical miles. Rachel Cormack, Robb Report, 8 Nov. 2022 Today, the average error at 1-day is less than 50 nautical miles. Marshall Shepherd, Forbes, 11 Nov. 2022 In 44 years of service, the ship sailed more than 1 million nautical miles — equivalent to more than 40 circumnavigations of the Earth — calling at more than 600 ports in 135 countries and projecting British influence around the world. Karla Adam, Washington Post, 11 Nov. 2022 Over the course of her 44 years in service, Britannia facilitated 968 official visits and traveled over one million nautical miles. Anna Fixsen, ELLE Decor, 8 Nov. 2022 The car’s look drew inspiration from modernist sculpture, nautical design, the night sky and haute couture, Rolls-Royce said. Camille Fine, USA TODAY, 19 Oct. 2022 They are known for their Breton tops, fisherman jumpers, and other nautical knits. Luke Leitch, Vogue, 10 Jan. 2022 With lighthouse wallpaper trim and sponge-painted walls, her blue and white nautical-themed bathroom looked like something left over from the '90s. Nathalie Kirby, House Beautiful, 31 Aug. 2021 See More

These example sentences are selected automatically from various online news sources to reflect current usage of the word 'nautical.' Views expressed in the examples do not represent the opinion of Merriam-Webster or its editors. Send us feedback.

Word History

Etymology

Latin nauticus, from Greek nautikos, from nautēs sailor, from naus ship — more at nave

First Known Use

1552, in the meaning defined above

Time Traveler
The first known use of nautical was in 1552

Dictionary Entries Near nautical

Cite this Entry

“Nautical.” Merriam-Webster.com Dictionary, Merriam-Webster, https://www.merriam-webster.com/dictionary/nautical. Accessed 29 Nov. 2022.

Kids Definition

nautical

adjective

nau·​ti·​cal ˈnȯt-i-kəl How to pronounce nautical (audio)
ˈnät-
: of or relating to sailors, navigation, or ships
nautically adverb

More from Merriam-Webster on nautical

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