move

verb
\ ˈmüv How to pronounce move (audio) \
moved; moving

Definition of move

 (Entry 1 of 2)

intransitive verb

1a(1) : to go or pass to another place or in a certain direction with a continuous motion moved into the shade
(2) : to proceed toward a certain state or condition moving up the executive ladder
(3) : to become transferred during play checkers move along diagonally adjacent squares
(4) : to keep pace moving with the times
b : to start away from some point or place : depart It was getting late and I thought it was time to be moving.
c : to change one's residence or location decided to move to the city
2 : to carry on one's life or activities in a specified environment moves in the best circles
3 : to change position or posture : stir ordered him not to move
4 : to take action : act The time has come to make up your mind and move.
5a : to begin operating or functioning or working in a usual way pushed a button and the machine began moving
b : to show marked activity after a lull things really began to move
c : to move a piece (as in chess or checkers) during one's turn
6 : to make a formal request, application, or appeal moved that the meeting adjourn
7 : to change hands by being sold or rented goods that moved slowly
8 of the bowels : evacuate

transitive verb

1a(1) : to change the place or position of moved the chair to a different part of the room
(2) : to dislodge or displace from a fixed position : budge The knife had sunk deeply into the wood and couldn't be moved.
b : to transfer (something, such as a piece in chess) from one position to another moved the bishop to take the knight
2a(1) : to cause to go or pass from one place to another with a continuous motion move the flag slowly up and down
(2) : to cause to advance moved the troops closer to the enemy
b : to cause to operate or function : actuate this button moves the whole machine
c : to put into activity or rouse up from inactivity news that moved them from their torpor
3 : to cause to change position or posture moved his lips but not a sound was heard
4 : to prompt or rouse to the doing of something : persuade the report moved us to take action
5a : to stir the emotions, feelings, or passions of deeply moved by such kindness
b : to affect in such a way as to lead to an indicated show of emotion the story moved her to tears
6a obsolete : beg
b : to make a formal application to
7 : to propose formally in a deliberative assembly moved the adjournment motion
8 : to cause (the bowels) to void
9 : to cause to change hands through sale or rent The salesman moved three cars today.
move house
British : to change one's residence

move

noun

Definition of move (Entry 2 of 2)

1a : the act of moving a piece (as in chess)
b : the turn of a player to move
2a : a step taken especially to gain an objective : maneuver a move to end the dispute retiring early was a smart move
b : the action of moving from a motionless position
c : one of a pattern of dance steps
d : a change of residence or location
e : an agile or deceptive action especially in sports
on the move
1 : in a state of moving about from place to place
2 : in a state of moving ahead or making progress said that civilization is always on the move

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Choose the Right Synonym for move

Verb

move, actuate, drive, impel mean to set or keep in motion. move is very general and implies no more than the fact of changing position. moved the furniture actuate stresses transmission of power so as to work or set in motion. turbines actuated by waterpower drive implies imparting forward and continuous motion and often stresses the effect rather than the impetus. a ship driven aground by hurricane winds impel is usually figurative and suggests a great motivating impetus. a candidate impelled by ambition

Examples of move in a Sentence

Verb He moved the chair closer to the table. It may be necessary to move the patient to intensive care. The breeze moved the branches of the trees. The branches moved gently in the breeze. She was unable to move her legs. She was so frightened that she could hardly move. I moved over so that she could sit next to me. We moved into the shade. The police were moving through the crowd telling people to move toward the exit. We could hear someone moving around upstairs. Noun He made a sudden move that scared away the squirrel. an athlete who has some good moves The policeman warned him not to make any false moves. He was afraid to make a move. No one is sure what his next move will be. He's preparing for his move to California.
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Recent Examples on the Web: Verb Fairplay's Golin was also dubious about how effective nudging teens to take a break or move away from harmful content would be. CBS News, 11 Oct. 2021 Henry O’Neil and Shea Cucinotta, Amesbury — O’Neill rushed for 136 yards on 19 carries to help Amesbury’s productive offense move the ball in a 30-28 win over Ipswich. BostonGlobe.com, 11 Oct. 2021 Meanwhile, there's the question of how the UK is seen abroad, particularly as other jurisdictions move towards tighter, rather than looser, data protection standards. Emma Woollacott, Forbes, 11 Oct. 2021 Detroit Lions coach Dan Campbell said Monday that his tentative plans are to keep Decker at left tackle and move rookie Penei Sewell back to right tackle once Decker is healthy enough to play. Dave Birkett, Detroit Free Press, 11 Oct. 2021 This also supports the studio’s intention to make the forward areas formal, so as guests move aft the more causal the design becomes. Julia Zaltzman, Robb Report, 11 Oct. 2021 That was the most telegraphed pre-draft move the Bears have made in some time. Brad Biggs, chicagotribune.com, 11 Oct. 2021 Singapore's decision to go ahead with the VTL comes as other countries in the Asia-Pacific region also move toward living with Covid. Rhea Mogul, CNN, 11 Oct. 2021 The National Weather Service reports a cold front will move into San Antonio late this week, dropping temperatures into the 50s by the weekend. Teresa Velasco, San Antonio Express-News, 11 Oct. 2021 Recent Examples on the Web: Noun Yes, allowing Caleb Martin to start against his twin brother, Cody Martin of the Hornets, on Monday night was indeed the perfect move for the preseason, with Jimmy Butler sidelined. Ira Winderman, sun-sentinel.com, 12 Oct. 2021 Bacon’s move into the wellness industry surprised her former boss, the Los Angeles chef Suzanne Goin of A.O.C. and Lucques fame. Christina Binkley, WSJ, 12 Oct. 2021 His five glass-blowers move with unspoken choreographed precision to fill an order of 1,800 Christmas ornaments speckled with golden flakes bound for Switzerland. Colleen Barry, ajc, 11 Oct. 2021 The move, by about a couple dozen drivers, was something Calvert County Public Schools officials expected and warned parents about. Fox News, 11 Oct. 2021 Fans respond rapturously after detection, but their biggest cheers are saved for Madonna’s acrobatic move – a handstand inside of a circular cutout that would be impressive at any age, never mind at 61, her age when the show filmed. Melissa Ruggieri, USA TODAY, 9 Oct. 2021 The big move, still in the planning stages, was prompted by his pending retirement from his current job. Jim Riccioli, Milwaukee Journal Sentinel, 9 Oct. 2021 The double move 6:05, first quarter: Nailor broke out vs. Western Kentucky a week ago with a team-high 12 targets for career highs of eight catches and 128 yards. Marlowe Alter, Detroit Free Press, 9 Oct. 2021 Expecting their first child, a Mexican-American couple move to a migrant farming community in 1970's California where strange symptoms and terrifying visions threaten their new family. Travis Bean, Forbes, 8 Oct. 2021

These example sentences are selected automatically from various online news sources to reflect current usage of the word 'move.' Views expressed in the examples do not represent the opinion of Merriam-Webster or its editors. Send us feedback.

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First Known Use of move

Verb

13th century, in the meaning defined at intransitive sense 1a(1)

Noun

1656, in the meaning defined at sense 1a

History and Etymology for move

Verb and Noun

Middle English, from Anglo-French mover, moveir, from Latin movēre; probably akin to Sanskrit mīvati he moves, pushes

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Time Traveler for move

Time Traveler

The first known use of move was in the 13th century

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Dictionary Entries Near move

movable type

move

move ahead/along

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Statistics for move

Last Updated

13 Oct 2021

Cite this Entry

“Move.” Merriam-Webster.com Dictionary, Merriam-Webster, https://www.merriam-webster.com/dictionary/move. Accessed 18 Oct. 2021.

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More Definitions for move

move

verb

English Language Learners Definition of move

 (Entry 1 of 2)

: to cause (something or someone) to go from one place or position to another
: to go from one place or position to another
: to cause (your body or a part of your body) to go from one position to another

move

noun

English Language Learners Definition of move (Entry 2 of 2)

: an act of moving your body or a part of your body : movement
: an action
: the act of moving to a different place

move

verb
\ ˈmüv How to pronounce move (audio) \
moved; moving

Kids Definition of move

 (Entry 1 of 2)

1 : to go from one place to another Let's move into the shade.
2 : to change the place or position of : shift Move your chair closer.
3 : to set in motion Come on, move your feet.
4 : to cause to act : persuade Your speech moved me to change my opinion.
5 : to affect the feelings of The sad story moved me to tears.
6 : to change position Stop moving until I finish cutting your hair.
7 : to change residence We moved to Illinois.
8 : to suggest according to the rules in a meeting I move to adjourn.

move

noun

Kids Definition of move (Entry 2 of 2)

1 : the action of changing position, place, or residence a sudden move We're excited about our move to a new state.
2 : the act of moving a piece in a game
3 : the turn of a player to move It's your move.
4 : an action taken to accomplish something a career move

move

verb
\ ˈmüv How to pronounce move (audio) \
moved; moving

Medical Definition of move

intransitive verb

1 : to go or pass from one place to another
2 of the bowels : to eject fecal matter : evacuate

transitive verb

1 : to change the place or position of
2 : to cause (the bowels) to void

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move

verb
moved; moving

Legal Definition of move

intransitive verb

: to make a motion moved to seize the property

transitive verb

: to request (a court) by means of a motion moved the court to vacate the order

More from Merriam-Webster on move

Nglish: Translation of move for Spanish Speakers

Britannica English: Translation of move for Arabic Speakers

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