lust

noun
\ ˈləst How to pronounce lust (audio) \

Definition of lust

 (Entry 1 of 2)

1 : usually intense or unbridled sexual desire : lasciviousness He was motivated more by lust than by love.
2a : an intense longing : craving a lust to succeed
b : enthusiasm, eagerness admired his lust for life
3 obsolete
b : personal inclination : wish

lust

verb
lusted; lusting; lusts

Definition of lust (Entry 2 of 2)

intransitive verb

: to have an intense desire or need : crave specifically : to have a sexual urge

Keep scrolling for more

Examples of lust in a Sentence

Noun He was consumed by lust. He was driven by a lust for power. Lust for chocolate drew her into the candy store.
See More
Recent Examples on the Web: Noun Of the seven deadly sins (pride, greed, wrath, lust, gluttony, sloth, and envy), only envy gives no pleasure, however fleeting. Robert Zafft, Forbes, 18 Sep. 2021 The songs on the young rock tyro's debut album Teenage Heartbreak (out Friday) channel the irresistible riffs, explosive choruses and mix of lust, heartache, rebellion and angst that defined pop-punk's golden age. John Norris, Billboard, 16 Sep. 2021 Almost all the ancient vices—envy, wrath, greed, pride and, notably, lust—can, and will, be facilitated by the internet over the course of the show. John Anderson, WSJ, 24 Aug. 2021 To be controlled by one’s emotions—lust, fear, anger, and the rest—is an obstacle to that goal. Gregory Hays, The New York Review of Books, 11 Mar. 2021 My insatiable lust for fishing had hijacked the trip. Matt Wyatt, San Antonio Express-News, 9 Sep. 2021 For those who've re-watched Fleabag season 2 an unholy number of times, Andie J. Christopher is here to slake our lust for another Hot Priest. Maureen Lee Lenker, EW.com, 30 July 2021 Watching her Mary slowly warm up to Saoirse Ronan’s Charlotte, first with chilly reserve and later with incandescent lust, is to watch an inverse of Winslet’s Marianne Dashwood. Manuel Betancourt, Vulture, 27 May 2021 What’s been discovered is the lust of murder, the everydayness of murder. Addie Morfoot, Variety, 2 Sep. 2021 Recent Examples on the Web: Verb Fantasies of love or lust open her up to violent visions of volcanoes, unrest and a hail of bullets, but all these disasters are outstripped by her longing. Washington Post, 29 Sep. 2021 Now cool-hunter kids lust after Jordan sneakers and Jean Prouvé No. 305 chairs. Jacob Gallagher, WSJ, 27 Sep. 2021 All other human passions are subsidiary to lust for money and contempt for those no longer in a position to dole it out. Geoffrey O’brien, The New York Review of Books, 29 Jan. 2020 But their convenience and easy setup has made campers everywhere lust after them. Will Egensteiner, Popular Mechanics, 18 Aug. 2021 In Big Church the message was simple: Men were prone to lust, women to gossip. Kelsey Mckinney, Star Tribune, 16 July 2021 Putin continues to lust after these three former Soviet republics, but only Belarus remains firmly in his orbit. Tracy Wilkinson Staff Writer, Los Angeles Times, 15 June 2021 Luckily, Bridgerton was just renewed for a season 3 and 4, so there will be many more hot people to lust after. Natalie Morin, refinery29.com, 14 Apr. 2021 The language—chosen but simple and unforced—speaks powerfully to lust, ripeness and anticipation. Sam Sacks, WSJ, 15 Jan. 2021

These example sentences are selected automatically from various online news sources to reflect current usage of the word 'lust.' Views expressed in the examples do not represent the opinion of Merriam-Webster or its editors. Send us feedback.

See More

First Known Use of lust

Noun

before the 12th century, in the meaning defined at sense 3a

Verb

12th century, in the meaning defined above

History and Etymology for lust

Noun and Verb

Middle English, from Old English; akin to Old High German lust pleasure and perhaps to Latin lascivus wanton

Keep scrolling for more

Learn More About lust

Time Traveler for lust

Time Traveler

The first known use of lust was before the 12th century

See more words from the same century

Dictionary Entries Near lust

lusory

lust

luster

See More Nearby Entries 

Statistics for lust

Last Updated

11 Oct 2021

Cite this Entry

“Lust.” Merriam-Webster.com Dictionary, Merriam-Webster, https://www.merriam-webster.com/dictionary/lust. Accessed 18 Oct. 2021.

Style: MLA
MLACheck Mark Icon ChicagoCheck Mark Icon APACheck Mark Icon Merriam-WebsterCheck Mark Icon

Keep scrolling for more

More Definitions for lust

lust

noun

English Language Learners Definition of lust

 (Entry 1 of 2)

: a strong feeling of sexual desire
: a strong desire for something

lust

verb

English Language Learners Definition of lust (Entry 2 of 2)

: to have a strong sexual desire for someone
: to have a strong desire for something

lust

noun
\ ˈləst How to pronounce lust (audio) \

Kids Definition of lust

: a strong longing She has a lust for adventure.

More from Merriam-Webster on lust

Nglish: Translation of lust for Spanish Speakers

Britannica English: Translation of lust for Arabic Speakers

WORD OF THE DAY

Test Your Vocabulary

Difficult Spelling Words Quiz

  • alphabet pasta spelling help
  • Which is the correct spelling?
How Strong Is Your Vocabulary?

Test your vocabulary with our 10-question quiz!

TAKE THE QUIZ
Love words? Need even more definitions?

Subscribe to America's largest dictionary and get thousands more definitions and advanced search—ad free!