limp

1 of 3

verb

limped; limping; limps

intransitive verb

1
a
: to walk with an uneven and usually slow movement or gait
especially : to walk favoring one leg
The injured player limped off the field.
b
: to go unsteadily : falter
After which the conversation limped for some time …Henry Green
2
: to proceed slowly or with difficulty
The ship limped back to port.
limper noun
plural limpers

limp

2 of 3

noun

: an uneven movement or gait : a favoring of one leg while walking

limp

3 of 3

adjective

1
a
: lacking firm texture, substance, or structure
limp curtains
her hair hung limp about her shoulders
b
: not stiff or rigid
a book in a limp binding
2
a
: weary, exhausted
limp with fatigue
b
: lacking in strength, vigor, or firmness : spiritless
limply adverb
limpness noun

Examples of limp in a Sentence

Verb The injured player limped off the court. The dog was limping slightly. The damaged ship limped back to port. The company has somehow managed to limp along despite the bad economy. Noun We noticed that the dog was walking with a slight limp. Adjective He gave me a very limp handshake. This plant isn't doing well—look how limp the leaves are. Her hair hung limp around her shoulders. I suddenly went limp and collapsed on the floor. He was limp with fatigue. See More
Recent Examples on the Web
Verb
Scherzer and Verlander were traded by midseason and the club limped to a 75-87 finish. Daniel R. Epstein, Forbes, 16 Feb. 2024 Still no Reynoso Star midfielder Emanuel Reynoso limped off the practice field in Blaine last Tuesday and has not returned to first-team training in California as of Monday. Andy Greder, Twin Cities, 12 Feb. 2024 Pack limped off the court midway through the second half with a knee issue but returned a few minutes later. Michelle Kaufman, Miami Herald, 10 Feb. 2024 Hatred is chopping off your toe and wondering why the other person isn’t limping. Hazlitt, 7 Feb. 2024 Cook, stirring, until tender but not limp or brown. Debbie Moose, Charlotte Observer, 31 Jan. 2024 But the latter struggled early and limped off in the second quarter after being sacked by Bubba Smith, the Colts’ behemoth defensive end. Mike Klingaman, Baltimore Sun, 27 Jan. 2024 Branden Albert quietly slipped out of the locker room, shook his head to an interview request and limped to the team bus. Adam H. Beasley, Miami Herald, 30 Jan. 2024 He was spotted two days later — Friday morning rush — limping up an entrance ramp to U.S. 218. Rick Montgomery, Kansas City Star, 30 Jan. 2024
Noun
But Manor was left in pain and with a permanent limp. Kat Teurfs, CBS News, 2 Feb. 2024 Erickson tried in three additional operations to fix it, the disciplinary report said, but the patient had to undergo a fifth surgery elsewhere and will always walk with a limp. Patrick Rucker, ProPublica, 15 Dec. 2023 The operation left her with scar tissue that prevented the full range of motion, early arthritis and a permanent limp. Katie Camero, NBC News, 16 Nov. 2023 The 47-year-old golf legend was seen over the weekend caddying for his son Charlie at the Notah Begay III Junior Golf Championship in Louisiana, walking with Charlie's bag and without a noticeable limp. Anna Lazarus Caplan, Peoplemag, 6 Nov. 2023 Chargers Austin Ekeler able to practice just a bit as Chargers’ ground game limps without him Sept. 27, 2023 At Texas Christian, Johnston became a star mostly lining up on the same side of the formation and in the same spot on every play. Jeff Miller, Los Angeles Times, 29 Sep. 2023 McConnell's concussion in March McConnell, a polio survivor, has for years walked with a noticeable limp and often has been assisted by aides and others when walking up and down the stairs. Phillip M. Bailey, USA TODAY, 27 July 2023 Another character with a limp named Doc Roberts, however, compensates in a completely different way. Hawa Allan, BostonGlobe.com, 10 Aug. 2023 Messi took several steps with a limp, favoring his left foot, before rejoining his teammates during the practice drill. Safid Deen, USA TODAY, 15 Aug. 2023
Adjective
The good news for the Chiefs is that by the end of the session at the Raiders’ practice facility in Henderson, Nevada, Rice walked off the field without a limp. Chiefs coach Andy Reid was asked if he was concerned about Rice. Pete Grathoff, Kansas City Star, 9 Feb. 2024 Like in a baroque painting, each was frozen in an expression of ecclesiastical grief, faces contorted, while the receiver to the red line lay in Hendrickson’s limp, upturned palm. Elliot Ackerman, WIRED, 5 Feb. 2024 For one person living with narcolepsy, an attack might look like a slack jaw or limp hand. Tribune News Service, Hartford Courant, 15 Jan. 2024 Thanks to the restoration process, none of the trim wobbles or creaks, and no levers sit limp. Alex Goy, Ars Technica, 4 Oct. 2023 Other wounded were ferried by hand, as several men struggled to carry a man’s limp body. Thomas Fuller, New York Times, 31 Dec. 2023 Told to take Griffen to a hospital, the friend instead drove him back to his home, dragging Griffen’s limp body to his bedroom before leaving for another party. Ben Bolch, Los Angeles Times, 25 Dec. 2023 However many stylists specifically recommend the treatment for anyone with fine, limp, lifeless hair that tends to get oily in particular. Danielle Sinay, Glamour, 5 Dec. 2023 In the wreckage below, men pulled the limp body of a child from under a slab next to a burning car. Wafaa Shurafa, arkansasonline.com, 6 Dec. 2023 See More

These examples are programmatically compiled from various online sources to illustrate current usage of the word 'limp.' Any opinions expressed in the examples do not represent those of Merriam-Webster or its editors. Send us feedback about these examples.

Word History

Etymology

Verb and Noun

probably from Middle English lympen to fall short; akin to Old English limpan to happen, lemphealt lame

Adjective

akin to limp entry 1

First Known Use

Verb

circa 1570, in the meaning defined at sense 1a

Noun

1818, in the meaning defined above

Adjective

circa 1706, in the meaning defined at sense 1a

Time Traveler
The first known use of limp was circa 1570

Dictionary Entries Near limp

Cite this Entry

“Limp.” Merriam-Webster.com Dictionary, Merriam-Webster, https://www.merriam-webster.com/dictionary/limp. Accessed 23 Feb. 2024.

Kids Definition

limp

1 of 3 verb
1
: to walk lamely
2
: to go slowly or with difficulty

limp

2 of 3 noun
: a limping movement or gait
walked with a limp

limp

3 of 3 adjective
1
: not firm or stiff
2
limply adverb
limpness noun

Medical Definition

limp

1 of 2 intransitive verb
1
: to walk lamely
especially : to walk favoring one leg
2
: to go unsteadily

limp

2 of 2 noun
: a limping movement or gait

More from Merriam-Webster on limp

Last Updated: - Updated example sentences
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