incise

verb
in·​cise | \ in-ˈsīz How to pronounce incise (audio) , -ˈsīs \
incised; incising

Definition of incise

transitive verb

1a : to carve (something, such as an inscription) into a surface
b : to carve figures, letters, or devices into : engrave
2 : to cut into

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Synonyms for incise

Synonyms

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Examples of incise in a Sentence

The design is incised into the clay. The clay is incised to create a design.
Recent Examples on the Web There is a plication procedure and there are procedures to incise the plaque out. Jeff Forward, Chron, 23 Nov. 2020 Of all the successes among heritage brands, few have exceeded that of the traditional boat shoe with white soles incised in a pattern of chevron grooves. New York Times, 5 Feb. 2020 It was incised on eleven tablets, back and front, with roughly three hundred lines on each tablet. Joan Acocella, The New Yorker, 7 Oct. 2019 Yet humans continue to intrude, as illustrated by Michael Marks’s print of mountaintop-removal mining and Laura Ahola-Young’s drawing, incised into a sea-and-sky scene, of undersea oil-drilling gear. Mark Jenkins, Washington Post, 6 Sep. 2019 And thousands of noncorroding Frisbee-size discs, incised with images of human horror, will be buried all around for any inquisitive diggers to find. Tim Heffernan, Popular Mechanics, 10 May 2012 Among other astonishments here are numerous gorgeous plasters—penciled, incised and painted. Lance Esplund, WSJ, 19 June 2018 After the Yankees incised Duffy on May 19, his ERA hovered near seven. Chandler Rome, Houston Chronicle, 16 June 2018 Twenty-eight days ago in Houston, Severino incised the Astros. Chandler Rome, Houston Chronicle, 30 May 2018

These example sentences are selected automatically from various online news sources to reflect current usage of the word 'incise.' Views expressed in the examples do not represent the opinion of Merriam-Webster or its editors. Send us feedback.

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First Known Use of incise

1567, in the meaning defined at sense 2

History and Etymology for incise

Middle French or Latin; Middle French inciser, from Latin incisus, past participle of incidere, from in- + caedere to cut

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Dictionary Entries Near incise

incisal

incise

incised

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Cite this Entry

“Incise.” Merriam-Webster.com Dictionary, Merriam-Webster, https://www.merriam-webster.com/dictionary/incise. Accessed 20 Oct. 2021.

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More Definitions for incise

incise

verb

English Language Learners Definition of incise

: to cut or carve (letters, patterns, etc.) into a surface also : to mark (a surface) by cutting or carving

incise

verb
in·​cise | \ in-ˈsīz How to pronounce incise (audio) \
incised; incising

Kids Definition of incise

: to cut into : carve, engrave A design was incised in clay.

incise

transitive verb
in·​cise | \ in-ˈsīz How to pronounce incise (audio) , -ˈsīs How to pronounce incise (audio) \
incised; incising

Medical Definition of incise

: to cut into : make an incision in incised the swollen tissue

More from Merriam-Webster on incise

Nglish: Translation of incise for Spanish Speakers

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