implore

verb
im·​plore | \ im-ˈplȯr How to pronounce implore (audio) \
implored; imploring

Definition of implore

transitive verb

1a : to make an earnest request to (someone) : beg We earnestly implore you to bow out of the practice of clinical medicine and permit us to get on with our difficult job.— William Steinsmith … electronic highway signs implore Californians to "Save Water" and municipalities impose increasingly draconian conservation measures …— Henry I. Miller
b : to say (something) as a request in a sincere or urgent manner "Keep your voice down," implored Lupin.— J. K. Rowling … accountability has become a watchword of relief agencies around the world, with new guidelines to help donors know that their aid won't be wasted. Give money, Presidents Bush and Clinton implore, and by implication, leave the rest to professionals.— Nancy Gibbs
2 : to ask or beg for (something) earnestly On this repetition of Mr Mantalini's fatal threat, Madame Mantalini wrung her hands, and implored the interference of Ralph Nickleby …— Charles Dickens To Neapolitans habitually blending pagan and Christian themes, the volcano also became, through its successive manifestations, a personality against whose rages they implored protection from their patron saint …— Shirley Hazzard

Other Words from implore

imploringly adverb

Choose the Right Synonym for implore

beg, entreat, beseech, implore, supplicate, adjure, importune mean to ask urgently. beg suggests earnestness or insistence in the asking. they begged for help entreat implies an effort to persuade or to overcome resistance. entreated me to join them beseech and implore imply a deeply felt anxiety. I beseech you to have mercy implored her not to leave him supplicate suggests a posture of humility. with bowed heads they supplicated their Lord adjure implies advising as well as pleading. we were adjured to tell the truth importune suggests an annoying persistence in trying to break down resistance to a request. importuning viewers for contributions

Examples of implore in a Sentence

Don't go. I implore you. “Think of the children!” he implored.
Recent Examples on the Web Larry Fink, the chief executive of BlackRock, has been among the most outspoken executives, using his annual letter to corporate leaders to implore them to look beyond the bottom line and make a positive contribution to society. New York Times, 27 May 2022 In many areas, law enforcement agencies are left to implore residents to lock their vehicles and remove their firearms before exiting. Melissa Chan, NBC News, 9 May 2022 Your head could be asking you to go in an uncharted direction that's been beckoning to you for a while now, while your heart may implore you to stick with what's familiar and comfortable. Tarot Astrologers, chicagotribune.com, 9 Apr. 2022 The outbreak upended travel and prompted officials to implore people to put off having kids. Robert Hart, Forbes, 12 Apr. 2022 The anticipated offshore leasing pause comes despite the war in Ukraine and high costs for oil, gas and gasoline that have prompted administration officials to implore energy companies to pump more crude. Jennifer A Dlouhy, Bloomberg.com, 29 Mar. 2022 Others point to overwhelmed hospitals and a climbing death toll to implore people to continue taking precautions to get through this surge and then reassess. Ariana Eunjung Cha, Anchorage Daily News, 29 Jan. 2022 Doctors continue to implore people to get vaccinated, mask up indoors and — if getting together with friends or family during the holidays — get tested beforehand. Dan Petrella, chicagotribune.com, 17 Dec. 2021 This has led political leaders to implore the public to drink and use more of the product. NBC News, 22 Dec. 2021 See More

These example sentences are selected automatically from various online news sources to reflect current usage of the word 'implore.' Views expressed in the examples do not represent the opinion of Merriam-Webster or its editors. Send us feedback.

First Known Use of implore

circa 1550, in the meaning defined at sense 1a

History and Etymology for implore

Middle French or Latin; Middle French implorer, from Latin implorare, from in- + plorare to cry out

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Time Traveler for implore

Time Traveler

The first known use of implore was circa 1550

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Dictionary Entries Near implore

imploration

implore

imploringness

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Statistics for implore

Last Updated

29 May 2022

Cite this Entry

“Implore.” Merriam-Webster.com Dictionary, Merriam-Webster, https://www.merriam-webster.com/dictionary/implore. Accessed 27 Jun. 2022.

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More Definitions for implore

implore

verb
im·​plore | \ im-ˈplȯr How to pronounce implore (audio) \
implored; imploring

Kids Definition of implore

: to make a very serious or emotional request to or for I implored him not to go. … they humbly implored my mercy.— Daniel Defoe, Robinson Crusoe

Other Words from implore

imploringly adverb

More from Merriam-Webster on implore

Nglish: Translation of implore for Spanish Speakers

Britannica English: Translation of implore for Arabic Speakers

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