grace

noun
\ ˈgrās How to pronounce grace (audio) \

Definition of grace

 (Entry 1 of 2)

1a : unmerited divine assistance given to humans for their regeneration or sanctification
b : a virtue coming from God
c : a state of sanctification enjoyed through divine assistance
2a : approval, favor stayed in his good graces
b archaic : mercy, pardon
c : a special favor : privilege each in his place, by right, not grace, shall rule his heritage— Rudyard Kipling
d : disposition to or an act or instance of kindness, courtesy, or clemency
e : a temporary exemption : reprieve
3a : a charming or attractive trait or characteristic Among disagreeable qualities he possessed the saving grace of humor.
b : a pleasing appearance or effect : charm all the grace of youth— John Buchan
c : ease and suppleness (see supple entry 1 sense 2b) of movement or bearing danced with such grace
4 used as a title of address or reference for a duke, a duchess, or an archbishop
5 : a short prayer at a meal asking a blessing or giving thanks
6 Graces plural : three sister goddesses in Greek mythology who are the givers of charm and beauty
7 : a musical trill, turn, or appoggiatura
8a : sense of propriety or right had the grace not to run for elective office— Calvin Trillin
b : the quality or state of being considerate or thoughtful accepted his advice with grace

grace

verb
graced; gracing

Definition of grace (Entry 2 of 2)

transitive verb

1 : to confer dignity or honor on The king graced him with the rank of a knight.
2 : adorn, embellish graveled walks graced with statues— J. A. Michener

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Choose the Right Synonym for grace

Noun

mercy, charity, clemency, grace, leniency mean a disposition to show kindness or compassion. mercy implies compassion that forbears punishing even when justice demands it. threw himself on the mercy of the court charity stresses benevolence and goodwill shown in broad understanding and tolerance of others. show a little charity for the less fortunate clemency implies a mild or merciful disposition in one having the power or duty of punishing. the judge refused to show clemency grace implies a benign attitude and a willingness to grant favors or make concessions. by the grace of God leniency implies lack of severity in punishing. criticized the courts for excessive leniency

Examples of grace in a Sentence

Noun She walked across the stage with effortless grace. She handles her problems with grace and dignity. He has shown remarkable grace during this crisis. She is quite lovable despite her lack of social graces. Let us give thanks for God's grace. By the grace of God, no one was seriously hurt. She tried to live her life in God's grace. Verb Several marble statues grace the courtyard. I hope that you will grace our gathering with your presence.
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Recent Examples on the Web: Noun Coleman had grace, sass and fierce stage presence playing a flamboyant man with HIV and Donté's mother, who loves him deeply but doesn’t want anyone in their family circle to know about his sexuality. San Diego Union-Tribune, 4 Oct. 2021 As for the victims involved in this one, hopefully their community will surround them with the love and grace needed to heal moving forward. Arkansas Online, 28 Sep. 2021 So many have been touched by her talent, generosity, intellect, grace, and wonderful sense of humor. Alexia Fernández, PEOPLE.com, 27 Sep. 2021 There are also pages full of gratitude, grace, and hope. Mary Colurso | Mcolurso@al.com, al, 8 Sep. 2021 Whatever may be next, Thomas has illumined this world with grace, beauty, humor, and love, and surely that is an intimation of immortality. BostonGlobe.com, 27 Aug. 2021 All along the way, his eye is trained on moments of calm, locating an inherent grace, style, and sublime beauty in the Black everyday. Jordan Coley, The New Yorker, 27 Aug. 2021 Who wouldn’t want to watch this small creature, thrown into a situation so much bigger than itself, extricate itself with notably more grace, dignity and poise than its predecessors? New York Times, 18 Aug. 2021 There is astounding grace, emotional depth, and imaginative speculations in this saga about a young family from Saigon. Stefanie Milligan, The Christian Science Monitor, 19 July 2021 Recent Examples on the Web: Verb Since its debut in September, the series has moved from hit to cultural phenomenon, quickly becoming the most streamed original program ever to grace the platform. Janelle Okwodu, Vogue, 7 Oct. 2021 With this years awards taking place Sunday night, her outfit remains one of the most iconic looks to ever grace the event's red carpet. CNN, 10 Sep. 2021 Omar Little was the best character in an all-star ensemble of them, on The Wire, IMO the best show ever to grace our TVs. Paul Daugherty, The Enquirer, 7 Sep. 2021 Arguably the deepest pool of talent to ever grace the field for the UAB football team has a massive void to fill in its offense. Evan Dudley, al, 31 Aug. 2021 Running Bra, which may easily be the most streamlined, well-fitting sports bra to ever grace my big bust during a workout. SELF, 30 June 2021 Best and Cantona were among the most skillful players ever to grace United, Beckham one of the club’s finest midfielders. Tim Bielik, cleveland, 27 June 2021 The video features photos and videos of Grohl, from his childhood riding a bike and in a yearbook to home videos with his family on through to performance footage of the Foo Fighters, who also grace the cover of Rolling Stone‘s October issue. Althea Legaspi, Rolling Stone, 16 Sep. 2021 The couple appear on one of the multiple covers of Time's 100 issue, while others who grace the magazine's front page include Simone Biles, Billie Eilish and Ngozi Okonjo-Iweala -- the first African woman to lead the World Trade Organization. Hannah Ryan, CNN, 15 Sep. 2021

These example sentences are selected automatically from various online news sources to reflect current usage of the word 'grace.' Views expressed in the examples do not represent the opinion of Merriam-Webster or its editors. Send us feedback.

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First Known Use of grace

Noun

12th century, in the meaning defined at sense 1a

Verb

1585, in the meaning defined at sense 1

History and Etymology for grace

Noun and Verb

Middle English, from Anglo-French, from Latin gratia favor, charm, thanks, from gratus pleasing, grateful; akin to Sanskrit gṛṇāti he praises

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Time Traveler for grace

Time Traveler

The first known use of grace was in the 12th century

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Dictionary Entries Near grace

Gracchus

grace

Grace's warbler

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Statistics for grace

Last Updated

12 Oct 2021

Cite this Entry

“Grace.” Merriam-Webster.com Dictionary, Merriam-Webster, https://www.merriam-webster.com/dictionary/grace. Accessed 24 Oct. 2021.

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More Definitions for grace

grace

noun

English Language Learners Definition of grace

 (Entry 1 of 2)

: a way of moving that is smooth and attractive and that is not stiff or awkward
: a controlled, polite, and pleasant way of behaving
: skills that are needed for behaving in a polite way in social situations

grace

verb

English Language Learners Definition of grace (Entry 2 of 2)

: to decorate or add beauty to (something)

grace

noun
\ ˈgrās How to pronounce grace (audio) \

Kids Definition of grace

 (Entry 1 of 2)

1 : a short prayer at a meal
2 : beauty and ease of movement
3 : pleasant, controlled, and polite behavior social graces She handled the situation with grace.
4 : goodwill, favor They were saved by the grace of God.
5 : the condition of being in favor He tried to get in their good graces.

grace

verb
graced; gracing

Kids Definition of grace (Entry 2 of 2)

1 : to do credit to : honor Will you grace us with your presence?
2 : to make more attractive : adorn A fountain graces the garden.

grace

noun

Legal Definition of grace

1 : a special favor : privilege considered by many authorities to be a matter of grace and not of rightThe Mentally Disabled and the Law
2a : a temporary exemption
b : the prerogative of mercy exercised (as by a chief executive) or granted in the form of equitable relief

More from Merriam-Webster on grace

Nglish: Translation of grace for Spanish Speakers

Britannica English: Translation of grace for Arabic Speakers

Britannica.com: Encyclopedia article about grace

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