esteem

noun
es·​teem | \ i-ˈstēm How to pronounce esteem (audio) \

Definition of esteem

 (Entry 1 of 2)

1 : the regard in which one is held especially : high regard the esteem we all feel for her
2 archaic : worth, value
3 archaic : opinion, judgment

esteem

verb
esteemed; esteeming; esteems

Definition of esteem (Entry 2 of 2)

transitive verb

1 : to set a high value on : regard highly and prize accordingly an esteemed guest
2a : to view as : consider esteem it a privilege
b : think, believe
3 archaic : appraise

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Synonyms & Antonyms for esteem

Synonyms: Noun

Synonyms: Verb

Antonyms: Noun

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Verb

regard, respect, esteem, admire mean to recognize the worth of a person or thing. regard is a general term that is usually qualified. he is highly regarded in the profession respect implies a considered evaluation or estimation. after many years they came to respect her views esteem implies greater warmth of feeling accompanying a high valuation. no citizen of the town was more highly esteemed admire suggests usually enthusiastic appreciation and often deep affection. a friend that I truly admire

Examples of esteem in a Sentence

Noun She has won esteem for her work with cancer patients. an athlete who is held in great esteem by her peers Verb I had esteemed the whole affair to be a colossal waste of time. although the works of the Impressionist painters are esteemed today, they met with scorn when they were introduced
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Recent Examples on the Web: Noun Uncertainty, insecurity, and low self-esteem can also be triggering. Q.ai - Make Genius Money Moves, Forbes, 18 Oct. 2021 Instead of strengthening the court’s public esteem, the draft materials noted, such a move would likely reduce it. Matt Ford, The New Republic, 15 Oct. 2021 Loss of a parent is linked to mental health problems, dropping out of school, low self-esteem, increased risk of substance abuse, risky behaviors and other problems. Julie Washington, cleveland, 12 Oct. 2021 The critical comments about her appearance tore at Pila’s self-esteem. Los Angeles Times, 12 Oct. 2021 That’s because severe symptoms can interrupt sleep, create feelings of anxiety, and hurt a person’s self-esteem, especially if the scalp psoriasis plaques are clearly visible. Sara Gaynes Levy, SELF, 11 Oct. 2021 Her precipitous downfall is the focus of What Happened, Brittany Murphy?, a two-part HBO Max documentary which traces her early successes, self-esteem struggles, and sudden, puzzling death. Ej Dickson, Rolling Stone, 11 Oct. 2021 Losing a primary or secondary caregiver is associated with a range of negative health effects, including lower self-esteem, a higher risk of suicide, and acts of violence. Max Bayer, CBS News, 7 Oct. 2021 That’s the kind of shame planting that can destroy self-esteem. Essence, 7 Oct. 2021 Recent Examples on the Web: Verb The Hierarchy of Needs continues, and includes more complex needs like love and belonging, esteem, and eventually, self actualization. Lindy Brewster, Forbes, 12 Oct. 2021 In return for these privileges, idols must please their benefactors by hiding their shortcomings or risk losing their fan base, sponsorships, or esteem. Dr. Richard Osibanjo, Forbes, 31 Aug. 2021 How might jurists who esteem their court, who value its history and integrity, respond to the credible threat of debasement by the executive? WSJ, 4 May 2021 It was also esteemed in Assyria, Babylonia and Persia, and the authors attributed the high price to the efforts required for its import to demanding regions. Kristen Rogers, CNN, 28 May 2020 That’s part of the reason my esteemed colleagues — OK, esteemed may be a bit strong — argue that the Cowboys will either move up or down in Thursday’s draft. Calvin Watkins, Dallas News, 20 Apr. 2020 Polan, born in 1982 in Ann Arbor and raised in Franklin, was esteemed in the New York art scene for, among other works, taking on the incredible task of drawing every person in the city. Darcie Moran, Detroit Free Press, 29 Jan. 2020 The father of democracy in Hong Kong is widely acknowledged to be Martin Lee, whom many of us have esteemed for decades. Jay Nordlinger, National Review, 24 Oct. 2019 Robert Thrasher, a former student now practicing law in New York City, says Mr. Skeel is esteemed at the law school for his work and beloved for his engaging and generous personality. Mary Beth Mccauley, The Christian Science Monitor, 23 Dec. 2019

These example sentences are selected automatically from various online news sources to reflect current usage of the word 'esteem.' Views expressed in the examples do not represent the opinion of Merriam-Webster or its editors. Send us feedback.

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First Known Use of esteem

Noun

14th century, in the meaning defined at sense 2

Verb

15th century, in the meaning defined at sense 3

History and Etymology for esteem

Verb

Middle English estemen to estimate, from Anglo-French estimer, from Latin aestimare

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Time Traveler for esteem

Time Traveler

The first known use of esteem was in the 14th century

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Dictionary Entries Near esteem

Este

esteem

esteemable

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Statistics for esteem

Last Updated

22 Oct 2021

Cite this Entry

“Esteem.” Merriam-Webster.com Dictionary, Merriam-Webster, https://www.merriam-webster.com/dictionary/esteem. Accessed 27 Oct. 2021.

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More Definitions for esteem

esteem

noun

English Language Learners Definition of esteem

 (Entry 1 of 2)

: respect and affection

esteem

verb

English Language Learners Definition of esteem (Entry 2 of 2)

: to think very highly or favorably of (someone or something)

esteem

noun
es·​teem | \ i-ˈstēm How to pronounce esteem (audio) \

Kids Definition of esteem

 (Entry 1 of 2)

: respect and affection Her work with children has won her esteem.

esteem

verb
esteemed; esteeming

Kids Definition of esteem (Entry 2 of 2)

: to think favorably of He was esteemed as a man of generosity.

More from Merriam-Webster on esteem

Nglish: Translation of esteem for Spanish Speakers

Britannica English: Translation of esteem for Arabic Speakers

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