estate

noun
es·​tate | \ i-ˈstāt How to pronounce estate (audio) \

Definition of estate

 (Entry 1 of 2)

2 : social standing or rank especially of a high order
3 : a social or political class specifically : one of the great classes (such as the nobility, the clergy, and the commons) formerly vested with distinct political powers
4a : the degree, quality, nature, and extent of one's interest in land or other property
b(1) : possessions, property especially : a person's property in land and tenements a man of small estate
(2) : the assets and liabilities left by a person at death
c : a landed property usually with a large house on it
d British : project sense 4
5 British : station wagon
6 : farm, plantation also : vineyard

estate

adjective

Definition of estate (Entry 2 of 2)

: previously owned by another and usually of high quality estate jewelry

Keep scrolling for more

Examples of estate in a Sentence

Noun His estate is worth millions of dollars. He inherited the estate from his parents. the grounds of the estate
See More
Recent Examples on the Web: Noun Reducing complexity and costs by embarking on programs like data estate modernization, data platform managed services and financial transformation. Azmath Pasha, Forbes, 15 Oct. 2021 Gerry Goffin's estate has entered a partnership with Primary Wave which will see the company acquiring a portion of his songwriting income. Kristin Robinson, Billboard, 15 Oct. 2021 The home was part of a 7.2-acre estate that included 800 feet of shoreline and a private island. Evan Frank, Milwaukee Journal Sentinel, 15 Oct. 2021 Call it a shooting brake, a sports wagon, a touring estate, the TTSCT looks rare, charismatic and fabulous. Dan Neil, WSJ, 14 Oct. 2021 The sons also took Murdaugh’s advice to hire attorney Cory Fleming to be executor of their mother’s estate without telling them Fleming was a longtime friend, old college roommate and godfather to at least one of Murdaugh’s sons. Jeffrey Collins, chicagotribune.com, 14 Oct. 2021 The sons also took Murdaugh’s advice to hire attorney Cory Fleming to be executor of their mother’s estate without telling them Fleming was a longtime friend, old college roommate and godfather to at least one of Murdaugh’s sons. Jeffrey Collins, Anchorage Daily News, 14 Oct. 2021 The film has been approved by Houston's estate, is being produced by her mentor Clive Davis who signed her to Arista Records and directed by Kasi Lemmons. Lisa Respers France, CNN, 14 Oct. 2021 The Curtis Brown Group has taken over representation for Iain Banks’ literary estate, including book to film rights. K.j. Yossman, Variety, 14 Oct. 2021 Recent Examples on the Web: Adjective Currently popular items among these shops include vintage cameras and typewriters, pocket watches and timepieces, Victorian and estate jewelry, military memorabilia and World War II posters, sterling silver, and advertising signs. Cheryl P. Rose, Houston Chronicle, 15 Nov. 2019 The third lot was zoned estate single-family detached dwelling district zoning. Steve Lord, Aurora Beacon-News, 12 Oct. 2017 First, the lawyer who drew up your estate documents might be willing to serve as your executor, says Holly Isdale, founder of Wealthaven, a consulting firm in Bryn Mawr, Pa., that focuses on financial and estate plans. Glenn Ruffenach, WSJ, 27 Mar. 2017

These example sentences are selected automatically from various online news sources to reflect current usage of the word 'estate.' Views expressed in the examples do not represent the opinion of Merriam-Webster or its editors. Send us feedback.

See More

First Known Use of estate

Noun

13th century, in the meaning defined at sense 1

Adjective

1978, in the meaning defined above

History and Etymology for estate

Noun

Middle English estat, from Anglo-French — more at state

Keep scrolling for more

Learn More About estate

Time Traveler for estate

Time Traveler

The first known use of estate was in the 13th century

See more words from the same century

Dictionary Entries Near estate

estanciero

estate

estate agent

See More Nearby Entries 

Statistics for estate

Last Updated

19 Oct 2021

Cite this Entry

“Estate.” Merriam-Webster.com Dictionary, Merriam-Webster, https://www.merriam-webster.com/dictionary/estate. Accessed 28 Oct. 2021.

Style: MLA
MLACheck Mark Icon ChicagoCheck Mark Icon APACheck Mark Icon Merriam-WebsterCheck Mark Icon

Keep scrolling for more

More Definitions for estate

estate

noun

English Language Learners Definition of estate

: all of the things that a person owns
: the things left by someone who has died
: a large piece of land with a large house on it

estate

noun
es·​tate | \ i-ˈstāt How to pronounce estate (audio) \

Kids Definition of estate

1 : the property of all kinds that a person leaves at death
2 : a mansion on a large piece of land
3 : state entry 1 sense 1 … he was hardly grateful that he had been spared, remembering how lonely was his estate— Mark Twain, The Adventures of Tom Sawyer

estate

noun
es·​tate | \ i-ˈstāt How to pronounce estate (audio) \

Legal Definition of estate

1 : the interest of a particular degree, nature, quality, or extent that one has in land or other property — compare fee, future interest at interest, remainder, reversion, tenancy
absolute estate
: an estate that confers an absolute right to property and that is subject to no limitations, restrictions, or conditions : fee simple absolute at fee simple
contingent estate
: an estate whose vesting is conditioned upon the happening or failure of some uncertain event
equitable estate
: the estate of one that has a beneficial right to property which is legally owned by a trustee or a person regarded at equity as a trustee (as in the case of a use or power) — compare legal estate in this entry
estate at sufferance
: the estate in property held by one who remains in possession of or on the property after his or her lawful right to do so has ended
estate at will
: an estate in property subject to termination at the will of another person
estate by the entirety
: an estate held by a husband and wife together in which the whole property belongs to each of them and passes as a whole to the survivor upon the death of either of them to the exclusion of the deceased spouse's heirs

called also estate by the entireties

— compare joint tenancy, tenancy by the entirety, and tenancy in common at tenancy
estate for years
: an estate that terminates after a set period
estate in expectancy
: an estate the enjoyment of which will take place at a future time : future interest at interest
estate of inheritance
: an estate that can be inherited (as a fee simple as opposed to a life estate)
estate on condition
: an estate subject to a contingency whose happening permits the grantor of the estate to terminate it if he or she so chooses — compare fee simple determinable at fee simple
estate pur autre vie
: a life estate measured by the life of a third person rather than that of the person enjoying the property
estate tail estates tail
: an estate granted to a person and his or her direct descendants subject to a reverter or remainder upon the inheritance of the property by a grantee without direct descendants : fee tail at fee
legal estate
: an estate to which one person (as a trustee) has legal title but of which another person has the right to the beneficial use — compare equitable estate in this entry
life estate
: an estate in property held only during or measured in duration by the lifetime of a specified individual and especially the individual enjoying the property — see also life tenant

Note: Life estates are not estates of inheritance.

vested estate
: an estate in which one has a right to enjoyment currently or sometime in the future
2 : all or designated items of a person's or entity's property considered as a whole
bankruptcy estate
: the estate of a debtor in bankruptcy that includes all the debtor's legal and equitable interests in property as set out in the bankruptcy laws

called also debtor's estate

— see also bankruptcy, trustee in bankruptcy
personal estate
: all of a person's property except real property broadly : all of the property belonging to a person
separate estate
: an estate whose ownership and control is enjoyed by a person free from any rights or control of another (as a spouse)
3a : the assets and liabilities left by a person at death — see also bequest, devise, freehold, heir, inheritance, intestate, leasehold, legacy, probate, testate, will
augmented estate \ ȯg-​ˈmen-​təd-​ \
: a deceased person's probate estate increased in accordance with statutory provisions and especially by the addition of any property transferred by the deceased within two years of death, any joint tenancies, and any transfers in which the deceased retained either the right to revoke or the income for life

Note: In some states, the surviving spouse's elective share is distributed from the augmented estate.

gross estate
: the estate of a person upon death defined by federal estate laws to include all of the deceased's real and personal property at death that may be passed by will or by intestate succession as well as specified property transferred by the deceased before death
probate estate
: all of a deceased person's estate that is administered under the jurisdiction of the probate court

Note: Some assets, such as certain insurance proceeds, generally do not become part of the probate estate and are said to “pass outside of probate.”

residuary estate
: all of what is left of an estate once the deceased person's debts and administration costs have been paid and all specific and general bequests and devises have been distributed

called also residual estate

taxable estate
: the estate of a deceased person that is subject to estate tax

Note: Under federal estate tax law, the taxable estate is the gross estate less allowed deductions.

b : the aggregate of a deceased person's property considered as a legal entity
4 : a tract of land especially affected by an easement
dominant estate
: a tract of land that is benefited by an easement burdening a servient estate
servient estate
: a tract of land that is burdened by an easement benefiting a dominant estate

History and Etymology for estate

Anglo-French estat, literally, state, condition, from Old French, from Latin status, from stare to stand

More from Merriam-Webster on estate

Nglish: Translation of estate for Spanish Speakers

Britannica English: Translation of estate for Arabic Speakers

WORD OF THE DAY

Test Your Vocabulary

Difficult Spelling Words Quiz

  • alphabet pasta spelling help
  • Which is the correct spelling?
True or False

Test your knowledge - and maybe learn something along the way.

TAKE THE QUIZ
Love words? Need even more definitions?

Subscribe to America's largest dictionary and get thousands more definitions and advanced search—ad free!