eschew

verb
es·​chew | \ e-ˈshü How to pronounce eschew (audio) , i-; es-ˈchü How to pronounce eschew (audio) , is-; also e-ˈskyü \
eschewed; eschewing; eschews

Definition of eschew

transitive verb

: to avoid habitually especially on moral or practical grounds : shun

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Other Words from eschew

eschewal \ e-​ˈshü-​əl How to pronounce eschew (audio) , i-​ ; es-​ˈchü-​ , is-​ ; also  e-​ˈskyü-​ \ noun

Choose the Right Synonym for eschew

escape, avoid, evade, elude, shun, eschew mean to get away or keep away from something. escape stresses the fact of getting away or being passed by not necessarily through effort or by conscious intent. nothing escapes her sharp eyes avoid stresses forethought and caution in keeping clear of danger or difficulty. try to avoid past errors evade implies adroitness, ingenuity, or lack of scruple in escaping or avoiding. evaded the question by changing the subject elude implies a slippery or baffling quality in the person or thing that escapes. what she sees in him eludes me shun often implies an avoiding as a matter of habitual practice or policy and may imply repugnance or abhorrence. you have shunned your responsibilities eschew implies an avoiding or abstaining from as unwise or distasteful. a playwright who eschews melodrama

Did you know?

Eschew derives from the Anglo-French verb eschiver and is akin to the Old High German verb sciuhen ("to frighten off"), an ancestor of our word shy. In his famous dictionary of 1755 Dr. Samuel Johnson characterized "eschew" as "almost obsolete." History has proven that the great lexicographer was wrong on that call, however. William Thackeray found "eschew" alive enough to use it almost one hundred years later in his classic novel Vanity Fair: "He has already eschewed green coats, red neckcloths, and other worldly ornaments." The word swelled in usage in English during the 19th and 20th centuries and is now common enough to be included even in small paperback dictionaries.

Examples of eschew in a Sentence

Though a doctor with psychiatric training, he eschewed the science that had so enamored earlier child-rearing professionals … — Sue Halpern, New York Review of Books, 29 May 2003 A fair number of academics eschew the simple title "professor" and call themselves economists, astronomers, historians, philosophers. — Tracy Kidder, Home Town, 1999 When introduced to a stranger, he eschewed formalities, stuck out a gnarled right hand and responded with a chummy, "Hermann." — Tim Layden, Sports Illustrated, 2 Feb. 1998 They now eschew the violence of their past. a psychologist who eschews the traditional methods of psychotherapy
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Recent Examples on the Web The Gamecocks rallied to within 17-14, setting up a final-play touchdown for the win on a 59-yard pass that saw the Seminoles inexplicably eschew a prevent defense for a man-to-man coverage. Erick Smith, USA TODAY, 13 Sep. 2021 Social media’s young followers, who eschew traditional entertainment platforms, are still a largely untapped market. Washington Post, 2 Sep. 2021 The most daring might eschew even that; at dances on hot summer nights in Montgomery, Ala., a young Zelda Sayre would slip off her underwear and ask her date to keep it in his pocket for her. Nancy Macdonell, WSJ, 18 Aug. 2021 As the first two games of this series have reminded Minnesota, the Twins not long ago possessed a left fielder who occasionally would eschew the safe play for the showy, the brainy play for the breathtaking. Phil Miller, Star Tribune, 25 June 2021 That’s the fine incurred by members who eschew their mask in the House chamber under a rule passed in January, with the amount going up to $2,500 for later offenses. Andrew Solender, Forbes, 18 May 2021 After hopping off your boat transfer on Firethorn (the vessel which will take you there from either St Mary’s or Tresco), eschew the offer of a lift in the 4x4. Angelina Villa-clarke, Forbes, 30 Aug. 2021 Such an ethos means that dark-fantasy authors often eschew the complex political schemes developed earlier in their work as their sagas continue. Nicholas Pompella, National Review, 7 Aug. 2021 Her rather unconventional account seemed to eschew long soloistic lines in favor of swatches of color, albeit delicately applied, and somewhat disconnected flashes of light and heat. BostonGlobe.com, 13 July 2021

These example sentences are selected automatically from various online news sources to reflect current usage of the word 'eschew.' Views expressed in the examples do not represent the opinion of Merriam-Webster or its editors. Send us feedback.

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First Known Use of eschew

14th century, in the meaning defined above

History and Etymology for eschew

Middle English, from Anglo-French eschiver (3rd present eschiu) of Germanic origin; akin to Old High German sciuhen to frighten off — more at shy

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Time Traveler for eschew

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The first known use of eschew was in the 14th century

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Dictionary Entries Near eschew

Escher

eschew

eschscholtzia

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Last Updated

4 Oct 2021

Cite this Entry

“Eschew.” Merriam-Webster.com Dictionary, Merriam-Webster, https://www.merriam-webster.com/dictionary/eschew. Accessed 25 Oct. 2021.

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More Definitions for eschew

eschew

verb

English Language Learners Definition of eschew

: to avoid (something) especially because you do not think it is right, proper, etc.

More from Merriam-Webster on eschew

Nglish: Translation of eschew for Spanish Speakers

Britannica English: Translation of eschew for Arabic Speakers

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