endure

verb
en·​dure | \ in-ˈdu̇r How to pronounce endure (audio) , -ˈdyu̇r, en- \
endured; enduring

Definition of endure

intransitive verb

1 : to continue in the same state : last entry 1 the style endured for centuries
2 : to remain firm under suffering or misfortune without yielding though it is difficult, we must endure

transitive verb

1 : to undergo especially without giving in : suffer endure hardships endured great pain
2 : to regard with acceptance or tolerance could not endure noisy children

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Choose the Right Synonym for endure

bear, suffer, endure, abide, tolerate, stand mean to put up with something trying or painful. bear usually implies the power to sustain without flinching or breaking. forced to bear a tragic loss suffer often suggests acceptance or passivity rather than courage or patience in bearing. suffering many insults endure implies continuing firm or resolute through trials and difficulties. endured years of rejection abide suggests acceptance without resistance or protest. cannot abide their rudeness tolerate suggests overcoming or successfully controlling an impulse to resist, avoid, or resent something injurious or distasteful. refused to tolerate such treatment stand emphasizes even more strongly the ability to bear without discomposure or flinching. unable to stand teasing

continue, last, endure, abide, persist mean to exist over a period of time or indefinitely. continue applies to a process going on without ending. the search for peace will continue last, especially when unqualified, may stress existing beyond what is normal or expected. buy shoes that will last endure adds an implication of resisting destructive forces or agencies. in spite of everything, her faith endured abide implies stable and constant existing especially as opposed to mutability. a love that abides through 40 years of marriage persist suggests outlasting the normal or appointed time and often connotes obstinacy or doggedness. the sense of guilt persisted

Examples of endure in a Sentence

She wants to make sure her legacy will endure. He endured five years as a prisoner of war. We endured the lecture for as long as we could.
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Recent Examples on the Web What’s up with all the harsh beatings Atticus had to endure in his childhood from his father? Los Angeles Times, 24 Aug. 2021 The Toyko Olympics will be remembered not for its closely fought battles for gold, or feats of superhuman athleticism, but for the COVID-19 measures athletes had to endure in order to compete in the middle of a pandemic. Amy Gunia, Time, 16 Aug. 2021 Low temperatures are expected to endure through the weekend, and start rising gradually thereafter, according to the meteorological institute. Star Tribune, 30 July 2021 Samsung had to endure a humiliating Galaxy Fold launch in 2019. Chris Smith, BGR, 19 July 2021 During the Trump Administration, the incompetence and infighting of American politics provided a valuable propaganda tool for Xi’s government, which may well endure in the decades ahead. Evan Osnos, The New Yorker, 1 July 2021 And with the frequency of millionaires growing each year in the region, that upward trend is expected to endure. Peter Lyon, Forbes, 30 May 2021 The Asian-American community is exhausted from being forced to endure this rise in bigotry and racist attacks. Shannon Rae Green, USA TODAY, 20 May 2021 The Asian American community is exhausted from being forced to endure this rise in bigotry and racist attacks. Libby Cathey, ABC News, 18 May 2021

These example sentences are selected automatically from various online news sources to reflect current usage of the word 'endure.' Views expressed in the examples do not represent the opinion of Merriam-Webster or its editors. Send us feedback.

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First Known Use of endure

14th century, in the meaning defined at transitive sense 1

History and Etymology for endure

Middle English, from Anglo-French endurer, from Vulgar Latin *indurare, from Latin, to harden, from in- + durare to harden, endure — more at during

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Learn More About endure

Time Traveler for endure

Time Traveler

The first known use of endure was in the 14th century

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Dictionary Entries Near endure

endurant

endure

endurer

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Statistics for endure

Last Updated

13 Sep 2021

Cite this Entry

“Endure.” Merriam-Webster.com Dictionary, Merriam-Webster, https://www.merriam-webster.com/dictionary/endure. Accessed 23 Sep. 2021.

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More Definitions for endure

endure

verb

English Language Learners Definition of endure

: to continue to exist in the same state or condition
: to experience (pain or suffering) for a long time
: to deal with or accept (something unpleasant)

endure

verb
en·​dure | \ in-ˈdu̇r How to pronounce endure (audio) , -ˈdyu̇r \
endured; enduring

Kids Definition of endure

1 : to continue to exist over a long time : last This tradition has endured for centuries.
2 : to experience without giving in They had to endure hardship to survive.
3 : to put up with He could not endure another minute of waiting.

More from Merriam-Webster on endure

Nglish: Translation of endure for Spanish Speakers

Britannica English: Translation of endure for Arabic Speakers

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