edge

1 of 2

noun

plural edges
1
a
: the cutting side of a blade
a razor's edge
b
: the sharpness of a blade
a knife with no edge
c(1)
: force, effectiveness
blunted the edge of the legislation
(2)
: vigor or energy especially of body
maintains his hard edge
d(1)
: incisive or penetrating quality
writing with a satirical edge
(2)
: a noticeably harsh or sharp quality
her voice had an edge to it
(3)
: a secondary but distinct quality
rock music with a bluesy edge
e
: keenness or intensity of desire or enjoyment
lost my competitive edge
2
a
: the line where an object or area begins or ends : border
on the edge of a plain
b
: the narrow part adjacent to a border
the edge of the deck
c(1)
: a point near the beginning or the end
especially : brink, verge
on the edge of disaster
(2)
: the threshold of danger or ruin
living on the edge
d
: a favorable margin : advantage
has an edge on the competition
3
: a line or line segment that is the intersection of two plane faces (as of a pyramid) or of two planes
4
edges : short fine hair that grows along a person's hairline : baby hair
With carefully finessed edges in delicate swoop and wave designs, hairstyles as simple as a high ponytail or sleek bob can quickly be transformed into a work of art …Devon Abelman
usually singular when used before another noun
edge styling
edgeless adjective

edge

2 of 2

verb

edged; edging

transitive verb

1
a
: to give an edge to
b
: to be on an edge of
trees edging the lake
2
: to move or force gradually
edged him off the road
3
: to incline (a ski) sideways so that one edge cuts into the snow
4
: to defeat by a small margin
often used with out
edged out her opponent

intransitive verb

: to advance by short moves
Phrases
on edge

Examples of edge in a Sentence

Noun They peered over the edge of the roof. The fabric was frayed at the edge. He made us all nervous by standing so close to the edge of the cliff. She sat on the edge of the counter, swinging her legs. the edge of an ax His voice had a sarcastic edge. These amendments will blunt the edge of the legislation. Verb Edge the sleeve with lace. She edged away from him. Gasoline prices have been edging upward. I edged my chair closer to the table. See More
Recent Examples on the Web
Noun
At the front corners of our Cybertruck there were gaps big enough to see daylight through and hard edges stuck out from the body. Peter Valdes-Dapena, CNN, 23 Feb. 2024 Networking can also open up avenues for partnerships and collaborations that can provide a competitive edge and offer insights into how other successful leaders are navigating similar challenges. Benjamin Laker, Forbes, 23 Feb. 2024 The release was expected given the Dolphins’ cap situation and after Ogbah played sparingly in the 2023 season, despite a litany of injuries at edge defender. Daniel Oyefusi, Miami Herald, 23 Feb. 2024 The embellishments, especially the fennel, hover at the edge of overwhelming the scallops without quite tipping over. Bill Addison, Los Angeles Times, 22 Feb. 2024 Unexpected design details such as a mitered edge finger pulls, antique wooden mortars from India, and a reclaimed Chinese bench from an 18th-century barn fill the outdoor area. Kristin Guy, Sunset Magazine, 22 Feb. 2024 The 18-karat red gold Stunning Sight version features a pavé dial, set with 281 diamonds that taper to curve around the edges of the chapter ring and tourbillon window. Cait Bazemore, Robb Report, 22 Feb. 2024 Intel failed to anticipate the importance of mobile computing a decade ago and also lost its manufacturing edge by choosing not to adopt the most advanced lithography techniques used to carve out silicon chips. Will Knight, WIRED, 21 Feb. 2024 Fort Funston on the southwestern edge of San Francisco is now part of the Golden Gate National Recreation Area. Don Sweeney, Sacramento Bee, 11 Feb. 2024
Verb
In India, the Sensex gained 0.7% and Bangkok's SET edged 0.1% higher. Zimo Zhong, Quartz, 23 Feb. 2024 When: Noon Saturday Where: Bonita Vista High School Preview: Torrey Pines edged Cathedral Catholic 2-1, then beat Westview in PKs in the semifinals. John Maffei, San Diego Union-Tribune, 22 Feb. 2024 Kevin Stefanski edged Houston's DeMeco Ryans for AP Coach of the Year honors by one first-place vote. Rob Maaddi, USA TODAY, 22 Feb. 2024 There are hundreds of luxurious homes situated within the rocky desert landscape or edged against the mountains around Palm Desert and the Coachella Valley, but few compare to Casbah Cove. Emma Reynolds, Robb Report, 21 Feb. 2024 Harvard has topped a notable set of world reputation rankings — but China’s leading universities are edging closer. Nick Morrison, Forbes, 13 Feb. 2024 The Dow Jones Industrial Average also set an all-time high after edging up by 48.97, or 0.1%, to 38,726.33. Stan Choe, Fortune, 9 Feb. 2024 Morris, 28, started for Denver throughout the 2021-22 season — when the Nuggets edged Minnesota for the No. 6 seed in the West — when Murray was out with a torn ACL. Jace Frederick, Twin Cities, 7 Feb. 2024 But the fall never happened–and the pessimists have quietly moved the cliff edge into 2024. Mike Sommers, Fortune Europe, 1 Feb. 2024 See More

These examples are programmatically compiled from various online sources to illustrate current usage of the word 'edge.' Any opinions expressed in the examples do not represent those of Merriam-Webster or its editors. Send us feedback about these examples.

Word History

Etymology

Noun

Middle English egge, going back to Old English ecg "cutting side of a blade, border," going back to Germanic *agjō "cutting side of a blade" (whence also Old Frisian eg "cutting side of a blade, sword," Old Saxon eggia, Old High German egga, ekka "cutting side of a blade, border, point, corner," Old Norse egg "cutting side of a blade"), feminine noun derivative from Indo-European *h2eḱ- "sharp, pointed," whence also Latin aciēs "sharp part of a weapon"

Note: The base *h2eḱ- "sharp, pointed" was productive of a large number of suffixed derivatives in the Indo-European daughter languages. Latin had a verbal base deriving from h2eḱ-eh1- "to be sharp" (see acetic acid, acid entry 2) and a presumed adjectival stem *acū- "sharp" (see acute). An apparently isolated derivative is Greek akmḗ "highest point" (see acme). For the derivative *h2eḱ-r-/h2oḱ-r-, with outcomes in Greek, Latin, and other languages, see acro-, mediocre. See also awn, ear entry 2.

Verb

Middle English eggen "to set (the teeth) on edge," derivative of egge edge entry 1

First Known Use

Noun

before the 12th century, in the meaning defined at sense 1a

Verb

14th century, in the meaning defined at transitive sense 1a

Time Traveler
The first known use of edge was before the 12th century

Dictionary Entries Near edge

Cite this Entry

“Edge.” Merriam-Webster.com Dictionary, Merriam-Webster, https://www.merriam-webster.com/dictionary/edge. Accessed 4 Mar. 2024.

Kids Definition

edge

1 of 2 noun
1
a
: the cutting side of a blade
a knife's edge
b
: the sharpness of a blade
a razor with no edge
c
: a harsh or sharp quality
his voice had a sarcastic edge
2
a
: the line where an object or surface begins or ends
also : the narrow part next to it
the edge of the deck
b
: the line where two plane faces of a solid meet
an edge of the cube
3
: advantage sense 3
our experience gave us an edge
edged
ˈejd
adjective

edge

2 of 2 verb
edged; edging
1
: to give an edge to
edge a sleeve with lace
2
: to advance slowly or by short moves
edged my chair closer

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