deride

verb
de·​ride | \ di-ˈrīd How to pronounce deride (audio) , dē- \
derided; deriding

Definition of deride

transitive verb

1 : to laugh at or insult contemptuously got derided by a carnival clown
2 : to subject to usually bitter or contemptuous ridicule or criticism politicians deriding their opponents : to express a lack of respect or approval of were derided as the weaker sex

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Other Words from deride

derider noun
deridingly \ di-​ˈrī-​diŋ-​lē How to pronounce deride (audio) , dē-​ \ adverb

Choose the Right Synonym for deride

ridicule, deride, mock, taunt mean to make an object of laughter of. ridicule implies a deliberate often malicious belittling. consistently ridiculed everything she said deride suggests contemptuous and often bitter ridicule. derided their efforts to start their own business mock implies scorn often ironically expressed as by mimicry or sham deference. youngsters began to mock the helpless wino taunt suggests jeeringly provoking insult or challenge. hometown fans taunted the visiting team

Did you know?

When deride was borrowed into English in the 16th century, it came to us by combining the prefix de- with ridēre, a Latin verb meaning "to laugh." Ridēre is also the ancestor of the English words risible ("laughable") and ridiculous. Of course, English has a number of words meaning "to laugh at unkindly"; in addition to deride, we have ridicule, mock, and taunt. Deride suggests laughter loaded with contemptuousness or bitterness, whereas ridicule implies a deliberate often malicious belittling ("consistently ridiculed everything she said"). Mock implies scorn often ironically expressed by mimicry or sham deference ("mocking the speaker's impassioned tones"). Taunt suggests jeeringly provoking insult or challenge ("hometown fans taunted the visiting team").

Examples of deride in a Sentence

my brothers derided our efforts, but were forced to eat their words when we won first place
Recent Examples on the Web Politicians and consumer groups deride the idea as just the latest corporate feint to gouge the public. Jeffrey Ball, Fortune, 28 Sep. 2021 Some deride the perpetrators as rogue sociopaths, consistent with the theory that one bad apple (or family of bad apples) can spoil the bunch. Robert Pearl, Forbes, 27 Sep. 2021 While critics often deride the costs of moving towards a greener economy, climate change is far more expensive, according to the European Central Bank. Robert Hart, Forbes, 23 Sep. 2021 Officials' advice, such as masking or social distancing, also is too often disregarded by those who deride COVID as a hoax. Editorial Board, Star Tribune, 16 July 2021 The diner often hosts a group of men with nowhere to go, and another group of three women, like a chorus, who sometimes speak in unison, or howl with laughter, or deride a rude guest. BostonGlobe.com, 20 Apr. 2021 Some found that idea to be forward thinking, while others derided it as a gimmick. NBC News, 3 May 2018 Eleven months ago, when the San Francisco Giants signed Pablo Sandoval to a minor league deal, the move was derided as typical sentimentality from a team unable to let go of the past. Ann Killion, SFChronicle.com, 22 June 2018

These example sentences are selected automatically from various online news sources to reflect current usage of the word 'deride.' Views expressed in the examples do not represent the opinion of Merriam-Webster or its editors. Send us feedback.

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First Known Use of deride

circa 1526, in the meaning defined at sense 1

History and Etymology for deride

Latin deridēre, from de- + ridēre to laugh

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Time Traveler for deride

Time Traveler

The first known use of deride was circa 1526

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Dictionary Entries Near deride

derham

deride

de rigueur

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Statistics for deride

Last Updated

10 Oct 2021

Cite this Entry

“Deride.” Merriam-Webster.com Dictionary, Merriam-Webster, https://www.merriam-webster.com/dictionary/deride. Accessed 26 Oct. 2021.

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More Definitions for deride

deride

verb

English Language Learners Definition of deride

: to talk or write about (someone or something) in a very critical or insulting way : to say that (someone or something) is ridiculous or has no value

deride

verb
de·​ride | \ di-ˈrīd How to pronounce deride (audio) \
derided; deriding

Kids Definition of deride

: to laugh at in scorn : make fun of : ridicule People once derided the idea that man could fly.

More from Merriam-Webster on deride

Nglish: Translation of deride for Spanish Speakers

Britannica English: Translation of deride for Arabic Speakers

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