depressive

adjective
de·​pres·​sive | \ di-ˈpre-siv How to pronounce depressive (audio) , dē- \

Definition of depressive

 (Entry 1 of 2)

1 : tending to depress
2 : of, relating to, marked by, or affected by psychological depression depressive symptoms a depressive patient

depressive

noun

Definition of depressive (Entry 2 of 2)

: one who is affected with or prone to psychological depression

Other Words from depressive

Adjective

depressively adverb

Examples of depressive in a Sentence

Adjective the depressive air of a dingy barroom where locals went to drown their sorrows
Recent Examples on the Web: Adjective The three top diagnoses generating those payments were peripheral vascular disease, major recurrent depressive disorder and Type 2 diabetes with peripheral angiopathy. Christopher Rowland, Washington Post, 5 June 2022 In this country, as many as four in 10 adults reported symptoms of anxiety or depressive disorder during the pandemic. Caroline Chirichella, Health.com, 21 Apr. 2022 Clayton had tried psychotherapy and an arsenal of traditional oral antidepressants over the years, but her severe depressive symptoms and suicidal ideations persisted. Raleigh Mcelvery, Smithsonian Magazine, 24 May 2022 In general, the depression rate for women is higher than men, and studies have found that women college athletes reported more depressive symptoms than male college athletes. Washington Post, 29 Apr. 2022 According to the study, in the last 15 years, at least six separate clinical trials have reported impressive improvements in depressive symptoms with psilocybin therapy. Maria Jimenez Moya, USA TODAY, 12 Apr. 2022 The author Emmy Gut argued in 1989 that some depressive symptoms can be a functional response to problems in the environment, leading us to pay appropriate attention and come up with solutions. Arthur C. Brooks, The Atlantic, 31 Mar. 2022 Sissi is more of a depressive rather than a narcissist or someone suffering borderline personality disorder. Leslie Felperin, The Hollywood Reporter, 23 May 2022 The book’s attention is less on the end of the world and more on the end of one particular family: a depressive novelist named Lyd; her self-pitying narcissist ex-husband, David; and their smart and sensitive 13-year-old daughter, Mott. New York Times, 15 Mar. 2022 Recent Examples on the Web: Noun Then there was Rushmore, about the friendship between a teenage oddball played by Jason Schwartzman and a wealthy depressive played by Bill Murray, the Anderson film that even the Anderson averse admit to tolerating. Alison Willmore, Vulture, 22 Oct. 2021 Cases for depressive and anxiety disorders last year are estimated to have increased by more than a quarter—an unusually large surge. Gary Stix, Scientific American, 8 Oct. 2021 In her first two novels, Conversations With Friends (2017) and Normal People (2018), the young Irish writer Sally Rooney resurrected the depressive, evacuated style that Ernest Hemingway made his signature. Caleb Crain, The Atlantic, 10 Aug. 2021 Writing about a listless depressive with seemingly no deep passions or excitements and no significant relationship with any other living being is the far greater challenge Lahiri has set herself. Sigrid Nunez, The New York Review of Books, 11 May 2021 Some people may experience psychotic symptoms (such as hearing voices) or experience suicidal thoughts due to the severity of their depressive or anxiety symptoms, Dr. Magavi says. Claire Gillespie, Health.com, 7 May 2021 The producer was a lifelong depressive whose last film had also flopped. Washington Post, 31 Mar. 2021 Aside from governing sleep, melatonin is linked to many other biological processes, like reproductive development, and may possibly underlie cancer and mental health disorders like major depressive or bipolar disorder. Miriam Fauzia, USA TODAY, 24 Nov. 2020 King’s characters are writers, doctors, teachers, bullied kids, depressives, alcoholics, people on low incomes. Washington Post, 8 Nov. 2019 See More

These example sentences are selected automatically from various online news sources to reflect current usage of the word 'depressive.' Views expressed in the examples do not represent the opinion of Merriam-Webster or its editors. Send us feedback.

First Known Use of depressive

Adjective

1620, in the meaning defined at sense 1

Noun

1937, in the meaning defined above

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Time Traveler for depressive

Time Traveler

The first known use of depressive was in 1620

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Dictionary Entries Near depressive

depression spring

depressive

depressor

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Statistics for depressive

Last Updated

19 Jun 2022

Cite this Entry

“Depressive.” Merriam-Webster.com Dictionary, Merriam-Webster, https://www.merriam-webster.com/dictionary/depressive. Accessed 30 Jun. 2022.

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More Definitions for depressive

depressive

adjective
de·​pres·​sive | \ di-ˈpres-iv How to pronounce depressive (audio) \

Medical Definition of depressive

 (Entry 1 of 2)

1 : tending to depress
2 : of, relating to, marked by, or affected by psychological depression the patient was paranoid and depressive depressive symptoms

depressive

noun

Medical Definition of depressive (Entry 2 of 2)

: one who is affected with or prone to psychological depression

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