dare

1 of 3

verb

dared; daring; dares or (auxiliary) dare

auxiliary verb

: to be sufficiently courageous to
no one dared say a word
she dare not let herself love G. B. Shaw

intransitive verb

: to have sufficient courage
try it if you dare

transitive verb

1
a
: to challenge to perform an action especially as a proof of courage
dared him to jump
b
: to confront boldly : defy
dared the anger of his family
2
: to have the courage to contend against, venture, or try
the actress dared a new interpretation of the classic role
darer noun

dare

2 of 3

noun

1
: an act or instance of daring (see dare entry 1 sense 1) : challenge
crossed the river on a dare
refused to take the dare
2
: imaginative or vivacious boldness : daring

DARE

3 of 3

abbreviation

Dictionary of American Regional English

Example Sentences

Verb Try it if you dare. We wanted to laugh but didn't dare. The actress dared a new interpretation of the classic role. She dared him to dive off the bridge. She dared me to ask him out on a date. I did, and he said yes.
Recent Examples on the Web
Verb
We triple dog dare you to not feel warm and fuzzy inside. Jessica Wang, EW.com, 1 Nov. 2022 The Dolphins game plan was clear: Double Ja’Marr Chase and Tyler Boyd and dare Higgins to win his 1-on-1 matchups. Cincinnati Enquirer, The Enquirer, 30 Sep. 2022 Yes, their plan was to dare the greatest running quarterback in NFL history to run. Ben Volin, BostonGlobe.com, 25 Sep. 2022 There was a sense of excitement and, dare it be said, even joy permeating the first in-person Edinburgh International TV Festival since 2019, which came to a close on Friday. K.j. Yossman, Variety, 26 Aug. 2022 Game nights will be a whole lot more fun thanks to this playful riff on truth or dare. Aemilia Madden, Harper's BAZAAR, 19 Aug. 2022 That’s when Republicans, desperate to hold on to political power, were spreading fear and paranoia about millions of Mexican immigrants wanting — how dare them! — resources and rights, and the inevitable decline of the state’s white population. Erika D. Smithcolumnist, Los Angeles Times, 15 May 2022 These stays have mysterious air about them, perfect for those who dare to interact with the afterlife. Krista Simmons, Sunset Magazine, 27 Oct. 2022 Under Xi, the party has ramped up surveillance and control of the Chinese diaspora, intimidating and harassing those who dare to speak out and threatening their families back home. Cnn Staff, CNN, 22 Oct. 2022
Noun
On Monday night, the Uncut Gems star attended the sartorial bash in New York City and didn't disappoint with her trademark dare-to-bare fashion. Michelle Lee, Peoplemag, 8 Nov. 2022 Since the 1975’s debut in 2013, each successive album from the band has felt like a response to a dare. Alex Swhear, Variety, 14 Oct. 2022 Then on a dare, both decided to divide it … and eat it. Bryce Millercolumnist, San Diego Union-Tribune, 1 Oct. 2022 If anyone goes near the corpse on a dare or out of curiosity, they’ll be met with cries of distress. Kevin Cortez, Popular Mechanics, 15 Sep. 2022 Ukraine has said Russian forces use the sprawling site as a fortress to launch artillery attacks, knowing that the Ukrainians across the river dare not fire back, for fear of hitting vital equipment and causing a radiation catastrophe. Andrew E. Kramer, BostonGlobe.com, 29 Aug. 2022 The Pogues originally wrote this song on a dare — a challenge put forth by Elvis Costello! Marisa Lascala, Good Housekeeping, 25 Aug. 2022 The 13-year-old boy, who told police the girl acted voluntarily on a dare, is being held in the Juvenile Detention Center on rape charges. Kaitlin Durbin, cleveland, 14 Aug. 2022 To up the guy in your life's game night fun, do a dare when the green blocks are pulled and ask a truth when the wood ones are chosen. Kelsey Stiegman, Seventeen, 11 Aug. 2022 See More

These example sentences are selected automatically from various online news sources to reflect current usage of the word 'dare.' Views expressed in the examples do not represent the opinion of Merriam-Webster or its editors. Send us feedback.

Word History

Etymology

Verb and Noun

Middle English dar (1st & 3rd singular present indicative), from Old English dear; akin to Old High German gitar (1st & 3rd singular present indicative) dare, Greek tharsos courage

First Known Use

Verb

before the 12th century, in the meaning defined at sense

Noun

1594, in the meaning defined at sense 1

Time Traveler
The first known use of dare was before the 12th century

Dictionary Entries Near dare

DARE

dare

Dare

Cite this Entry

“Dare.” Merriam-Webster.com Dictionary, Merriam-Webster, https://www.merriam-webster.com/dictionary/dare. Accessed 29 Nov. 2022.

Kids Definition

dare 1 of 2

verb

ˈda(ə)r How to pronounce dare (audio)
ˈde(ə)r
dared; daring
1
a
: to have enough courage : be bold enough to
try it if you dare
b
used as a helping verb
no one dared say a word
2
: to challenge to perform an action especially as a proof of courage
I dare you
3
: to face boldly
dared the dangerous crossing

dare

2 of 2

noun

: an act or instance of daring : challenge
dived from the bridge on a dare

Biographical Definition

Dare

biographical name

Virginia 1587–? 1st child born in America of English parents

More from Merriam-Webster on dare

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