conducive

adjective
con·​du·​cive | \ kən-ˈdü-siv How to pronounce conducive (audio) , -ˈdyü- \

Essential Meaning of conducive

formal : making it easy, possible, or likely for something to happen or exist

Full Definition of conducive

: tending to promote or assist an atmosphere conducive to education

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Other Words from conducive

conduciveness noun

Synonyms for conducive

Synonyms

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Something conducive "leads to" a desirable result. A cozy living room may be conducive to relaxed conversation, just as a boardroom may be conducive to more intense discussions. Particular tax policies are often conducive to savings and investment, whereas others are conducive to consumer spending. Notice that conducive is almost always followed by to.

Examples of conducive in a Sentence

… air-conditioner cooling towers on the roof provided a conducive summertime abode, from which the germs circulated throughout the edifice in a fine infectious mist. — Wayne Biddle, A Field Guide to Germs, 1995 To the extent to which the political realm is more conducive to rational choice, compared with the social realm which is governed by material and economic concerns, it is in politics that the potentiality for freedom lies. — Gertrude Himmelfarb, The New History and the Old, 1987 It was a hard time, and not conducive to obedience and warmth, and fairly soon I was tucked into a kindly concentration camp for budding Christians … — M. F. K. Fisher, Journal of Gastronomy, Summer 1984 The small hat of woven green plastic raffia, the jazzy short-sleeved shirt (fundamentally orange), the pale blue shorts, were not garments conducive to dignity. — A. N. Wilson, Scandal or Priscilla's Kindness, 1983 the claim that the state's long-standing antitax attitude is conducive to entrepreneurship the noisy environment of the dorms was not very conducive to studying
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Recent Examples on the Web Currently, conditions across most of the Atlantic are not conducive for hurricane formation. Brandon Miller And Judson Jones, CNN, 14 Oct. 2021 For years, astronomers have been hunting for signs of planets interacting with the magnetic fields of their stars, focusing on the small subsets of suns thought to be most conducive for the search. Nola Taylor Tillman, Scientific American, 11 Oct. 2021 Your data needs to be stored in open data formats that are conducive for analysis across the organization. Forbes, 5 Oct. 2021 The upper-level pattern will not be conducive for any rain chances until perhaps late in the weekend or early next week. Dallas News, 23 Aug. 2021 The tropical wave was about 1,400 miles east of the Lesser Antilles early Thursday but the environment ahead of it is expected to be conducive for development in the coming days. Ryan W. Miller, USA TODAY, 12 Aug. 2021 Brazil is the world's largest coffee producer, as its climate is most conducive for production of the beans. Marcelo Teixeira Reuters, Star Tribune, 24 July 2021 City of Angeles used to be an independent study program for students — such as child actors — whose schedules weren’t conducive to normal school hours or who had other unusual needs. Karen Kaplan Science And Medicine Editor, Los Angeles Times, 28 Sep. 2021 Upper-level winds are likely to become less conducive for development when the system reaches the southwestern Atlantic by the early to middle part of next week. Steve Svekis, sun-sentinel.com, 19 Sep. 2021

These example sentences are selected automatically from various online news sources to reflect current usage of the word 'conducive.' Views expressed in the examples do not represent the opinion of Merriam-Webster or its editors. Send us feedback.

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First Known Use of conducive

1646, in the meaning defined above

History and Etymology for conducive

conduce + -ive

Note: English derivatives with -ive are normally formed from the past participle of a Latin verb. The adjective conducive is an exception. Presumably this is the case because conduct entry 1 already existed as a verb, but it lacked an original sense of Latin condūcere, "to tend to support, be of advantage (to)"—so that conductive would not convey the right meaning. The alternative was to form an -ive adjective directly from the verb.

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Time Traveler for conducive

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The first known use of conducive was in 1646

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Dictionary Entries Near conducive

conducible

conducive

conduct

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Last Updated

25 Oct 2021

Cite this Entry

“Conducive.” Merriam-Webster.com Dictionary, Merriam-Webster, https://www.merriam-webster.com/dictionary/conducive. Accessed 28 Oct. 2021.

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Nglish: Translation of conducive for Spanish Speakers

Britannica English: Translation of conducive for Arabic Speakers

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