concrete

adjective
con·​crete | \ (ˌ)kän-ˈkrēt How to pronounce concrete (audio) , ˈkän-ˌkrēt, kən-ˈkrēt How to pronounce concrete (audio) \

Essential Meaning of concrete

1 : made of concrete a concrete floor/wall concrete blocks concrete structures
2 : relating to or involving specific people, things, or actions rather than general ideas or qualities It's helpful to have concrete examples of how words are used in context. The police suspected that he was guilty, but they had no concrete evidence against him. [=the police had no clear and definite proof that he committed the crime] See More Examplesconcrete facts Does anyone have any concrete [=specific] suggestions for how we can fix this? We hope the meetings will produce concrete results.Hide

Full Definition of concrete

 (Entry 1 of 3)

1 : naming a real thing or class of things the word poem is concrete, poetry is abstract
2 : formed by coalition of particles into one solid mass
3a : characterized by or belonging to immediate experience of actual things or events
b : specific, particular a concrete proposal
c : real, tangible concrete evidence
4 : relating to or made of concrete a concrete wall

concrete

verb
con·​crete | \ ˈkän-ˌkrēt How to pronounce concrete (audio) , kän-ˈkrēt How to pronounce concrete (audio) \
concreted; concreting

Definition of concrete (Entry 2 of 3)

transitive verb

1a : to form into a solid mass : solidify
b : combine, blend
2 : to make actual or real : cause to take on the qualities of reality
3 : to cover with, form of, or set in concrete The statues were concreted to the ground.

concrete

noun
con·​crete | \ ˈkän-ˌkrēt How to pronounce concrete (audio) , (ˌ)kän-ˈkrēt \

Definition of concrete (Entry 3 of 3)

1 : a mass formed by concretion or coalescence of separate particles of matter in one body
2 : a hard strong building material made by mixing a cementing material (such as portland cement) and a mineral aggregate (such as sand and gravel) with sufficient water to cause the cement to set and bind the entire mass
3 : a waxy essence of flowers prepared by extraction and evaporation and used in perfumery

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Other Words from concrete

Adjective

concretely adverb
concreteness noun

Did you know?

Adjective

We can trace "concrete" back to the Latin verb concrescere, meaning "to grow together." Appropriately, when if first entered English "concrete" could mean "connected by growth." Logicians and grammarians also applied "concrete" to words that expressed a quality viewed as being united with the thing it describes. That in turn led to the sense of "concrete" which we now contrast with "abstract" - concrete words express actual things ("rock," "lizard, "harpsichord"), while abstract words express qualities apart from actual things ("bliss," "freedom," "turpitude"). It was not until the 19th century that the noun "concrete," and its related adjective, began to be used for the building material composed of cementing material and sand, gravel, or similar materials.

Examples of concrete in a Sentence

Adjective It's helpful to have concrete examples of how words are used in context. We hope the meetings will produce concrete results. Verb the mortar slowly concreted in the mold a choral work that concretes music and dance into a stunning theatrical experience
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Recent Examples on the Web: Adjective The photographs showed holes in some of the concrete stair treads. BostonGlobe.com, 16 Sep. 2021 Bike routes are along Pacific Coast Highway near Zuma Beach; runs follow concrete beach paths. Los Angeles Times, 16 Sep. 2021 Anne Kearney will give people concrete strategies for saving money and having a smaller environmental footprint. courant.com, 16 Sep. 2021 To me, this feels like Kyland exploring all options rather than anything concrete. Kyle Fowle, EW.com, 16 Sep. 2021 Another notable design feature of the monolith home is its concrete walkway. Dobrina Zhekova, Travel + Leisure, 15 Sep. 2021 Expect the Education Department, led by Secretary Miguel Cardona, to implement concrete changes to your student loans. Zack Friedman, Forbes, 15 Sep. 2021 The concrete recycler began construction in early 2020 on a 50-acre property located near neighborhoods in Stonecrest. Zachary Hansen, ajc, 15 Sep. 2021 As well as having its share of villainous lairs, concrete bunkers, and secret laboratories, Blackreef has its own funfair complex, a rooftop bar, and even a plush, renovated castle that comes with a dance floor and comedy club. Ewan Wilson, Wired, 15 Sep. 2021 Recent Examples on the Web: Verb Rigolon acknowledged that having a large area of irrigated turf is preferable to asphalt or concrete. Leia Larsen, The Salt Lake Tribune, 23 July 2021 Even as the White House tried to play down expectations beforehand, intense focus will continue on whether there will concrete results out of the summit. Libby Cathey, ABC News, 16 June 2021 Aside from not trying to drill concrete with a bit made for wood, here are some factors for purchasing a set of quality bits that will last you more than one job. The Editors, Field & Stream, 7 Dec. 2020 How could concrete contort that much without exploding into dust? Bruce Jenkins, SFChronicle.com, 27 June 2020 The Kwai’s crew of 11, sailors accustomed to unloading anything from cars to concrete on isolated islands, uses winches and sweat to hoist the heavy nets from the Great Pacific Garbage Patch, where swirling currents gather floating debris. Doug Struck, The Christian Science Monitor, 19 June 2020 That is, if the information gathered by investigators leads to concrete results within the church and the criminal justice system. Washington Post, 5 Mar. 2020 The location will also serve local brews and frozen custard concretes with mix-ins by Chicago bakeries like Hot Chocolate Bakery and Bang Bang Pie. Grace Wong, chicagotribune.com, 17 Oct. 2019 Small fish peer out from the necks of the jugs, which the passage of time has concreted into the seabed. Elena Becatoros, The Seattle Times, 2 Aug. 2017 Recent Examples on the Web: Noun Some barns were completely reduced to concrete, roofs ripped off others, equipment was demolished, uprooted trees crashed into the old farmhouse. Christina Paciolla, ajc, 7 Sep. 2021 Some barns were completely reduced to concrete, with roofs ripped off others, equipment demolished and uprooted trees crashed into the old farmhouse. From Usa Today Network And Wire Reports, USA TODAY, 7 Sep. 2021 The force from the stomp pushed Gailyard to the concrete. Chris Harris, PEOPLE.com, 4 Aug. 2021 An engineer warned the building’s residents in 2018 about serious damage to the concrete and rebar holding the building up. Adam Rogers, Wired, 1 July 2021 The video then cuts to the woman walking again when the man runs up and tackles her from behind, forcing her to the concrete. Stephanie Pagones, Fox News, 1 July 2021 Some of the damage to the concrete in the parking garage was minor, while other columns had exposed and deteriorating rebar. Curt Anderson And Bernard Condon, chicagotribune.com, 27 June 2021 Some of the damage to the concrete in the parking garage was minor, while other columns had exposed and deteriorating rebar. BostonGlobe.com, 27 June 2021 This cooler comes with a detachable cart that sits on top of wheels designed to withstand all terrains from sand to grass to concrete. Rachel Klein, Forbes, 14 June 2021

These example sentences are selected automatically from various online news sources to reflect current usage of the word 'concrete.' Views expressed in the examples do not represent the opinion of Merriam-Webster or its editors. Send us feedback.

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First Known Use of concrete

Adjective

14th century, in the meaning defined at sense 1

Verb

1590, in the meaning defined at transitive sense 1a

Noun

1656, in the meaning defined at sense 1

History and Etymology for concrete

Adjective

Middle English concret "(of words) denoting a quality as adherent in a substance rather than in isolation," borrowed from Medieval Latin concrētus "composite, solidified, (of words) denoting a quality adherent in a substance rather than in isolation," going back to Latin, "formed, composite, condensed, solid," from past participle of concrēscere "to coalesce, condense, solidify, harden" — more at concrescence

Verb

borrowed from Latin concrētus, past participle of concrēscere "to coalesce, condense, solidify, harden" — more at concrescence

Noun

derivative of concrete entry 1

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Time Traveler for concrete

Time Traveler

The first known use of concrete was in the 14th century

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Dictionary Entries Near concrete

concreta

concrete

concrete block

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Statistics for concrete

Last Updated

19 Sep 2021

Cite this Entry

“Concrete.” Merriam-Webster.com Dictionary, Merriam-Webster, https://www.merriam-webster.com/dictionary/concrete. Accessed 24 Sep. 2021.

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More Definitions for concrete

concrete

adjective
con·​crete | \ kän-ˈkrēt How to pronounce concrete (audio) \

Kids Definition of concrete

 (Entry 1 of 2)

1 : made of or relating to concrete
2 : being specific and useful a concrete example
3 : being real and useful concrete evidence

concrete

noun
con·​crete | \ ˈkän-ˌkrēt How to pronounce concrete (audio) \

Kids Definition of concrete (Entry 2 of 2)

: a hardened mixture of cement, sand, and water with gravel or broken stone used in construction

More from Merriam-Webster on concrete

Nglish: Translation of concrete for Spanish Speakers

Britannica English: Translation of concrete for Arabic Speakers

Britannica.com: Encyclopedia article about concrete

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