conclusion

noun

con·​clu·​sion kən-ˈklü-zhən How to pronounce conclusion (audio)
1
a
: a reasoned judgment : inference
The obvious conclusion is that she was negligent.
b
: the necessary consequence of two or more propositions taken as premises
especially : the inferred proposition of a syllogism
2
: the last part of something
The team was exhausted at the conclusion of the game.
: such as
a
: result, outcome
The peace talks came to a successful conclusion.
b
conclusions plural : trial of strength or skill
used in the phrase try conclusions
c
: a final summation
the counsel's conclusion to the jury
d
: the final decision in a law case
e
: the final part of a pleading in law
3
: an act or instance of concluding
hoped for a quick conclusion to the war

Examples of conclusion in a Sentence

The evidence does not support the report's conclusions. The evidence points to the inescapable conclusion that she was negligent. The logical conclusion is that she was negligent. What led you to that conclusion? They haven't yet arrived at a conclusion. the conclusion of a business deal The case was finally brought to conclusion last week. See More
Recent Examples on the Web The high occurrence of deaths in sailors from asbestosis also strengthened the team’s conclusion. Laura Baisas, Popular Science, 16 Nov. 2023 David Barnes, who has been detained in Moscow for nearly two years, is expected to testify in front of the judge who will decide his fate at the conclusion of the bench trial. Jared Kofsky, ABC News, 13 Nov. 2023 Since the saga's conclusion, Kendrick has developed a knack for cinching franchise roles, appearing in both the Pitch Perfect and Trolls movie series. Ale Russian, Peoplemag, 13 Nov. 2023 There was no unanimity — and some caution about drawing conclusions absent an ability to examine evidence on the ground. David Bauder, Fortune, 13 Nov. 2023 Speaking to reporters in New Delhi at the conclusion of his latest diplomatic tour, Blinken stressed that civilian casualties remain a huge concern and that Biden administration officials are discussing with their Israeli counterparts ways to limit those numbers from growing even more. Vivian Salama, WSJ, 11 Nov. 2023 The Kotzebue Police Department did not answer certain questions about the death investigation, including any about what conclusions Milliette drew from the rifle measurements, referring questions to the former police chief. Kyle Hopkins, ProPublica, 11 Nov. 2023 That interpretation falters in light of the conclusion, however. Lili Loofbourow, Washington Post, 10 Nov. 2023 Your conclusions may all be glaringly obvious to the right. Noah Rothman, National Review, 10 Nov. 2023 See More

These examples are programmatically compiled from various online sources to illustrate current usage of the word 'conclusion.' Any opinions expressed in the examples do not represent those of Merriam-Webster or its editors. Send us feedback about these examples.

Word History

Etymology

Middle English, from Anglo-French, from Latin conclusion-, conclusio, from concludere — see conclude

First Known Use

14th century, in the meaning defined at sense 1a

Time Traveler
The first known use of conclusion was in the 14th century

Dictionary Entries Near conclusion

Cite this Entry

“Conclusion.” Merriam-Webster.com Dictionary, Merriam-Webster, https://www.merriam-webster.com/dictionary/conclusion. Accessed 28 Nov. 2023.

Kids Definition

conclusion

noun
con·​clu·​sion kən-ˈklü-zhən How to pronounce conclusion (audio)
1
: a final decision reached by reasoning
came to the conclusion that we couldn't go
2
a
: the last part of something : end
b
: a final result : outcome
c
: a final summing up
the conclusion of a speech
3
: an act or instance of concluding

Legal Definition

conclusion

noun
con·​clu·​sion kən-ˈklü-zhən How to pronounce conclusion (audio)
1
: a judgment or opinion inferred from relevant facts
our conclusion upon the present evidenceMissouri v. Illinois, 200 U.S. 496 (1905)
2
a
: a final summarizing (as of a closing argument)
b
: the last or closing part of something
3
: an opinion or judgment offered without supporting evidence
specifically : an allegation made in a pleading that is not based on facts set forth in the pleading

More from Merriam-Webster on conclusion

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