cold

adjective
\ ˈkōld How to pronounce cold (audio) \

Definition of cold

 (Entry 1 of 3)

1a : having or being a temperature that is uncomfortably low for humans it is cold outside today a cold drafty attic
b : having a relatively low temperature or one lower than normal or expected the bath water has gotten cold
c : not heated: such as
(1) of food : served without heating especially after initial cooking or processing cold cereal cold roast beef
(2) : served chilled or with ice a cold drink
(3) : involving processing without the use of heat cold working of steel
2a : marked by a lack of the warmth of normal human emotion, friendliness, or compassion a cold stare got a cold reception also : not moved to enthusiasm the movie leaves me cold
b : not colored or affected by personal feeling or bias : detached, indifferent cold chronicles recorded by an outsider— Andrew Sarris also : impersonal, objective cold facts cold reality
c : marked by sure familiarity : pat had her lines cold weeks before opening night
3 : conveying the impression of being cold: such as
a : depressing, gloomy cold gray skies
4a : marked by the loss of normal body heat cold hands especially : dead … she lay cold and still—she was gone … — Upton Sinclair
b : giving the appearance of being dead : unconscious passed out cold
5a : having lost freshness or vividness : stale dogs trying to pick up a cold scent
b : far off the mark : not close to finding or solving used especially in children's games
c : marked by poor or unlucky performance the team's shooting turned cold in the second half
d : not prepared or suitably warmed up The player's sub entered the game cold.
in cold blood
: with premeditation : deliberately was killed in cold blood

cold

noun

Definition of cold (Entry 2 of 3)

1 : bodily sensation produced by loss or lack of heat they died of the cold
2 : a condition of low temperature extremes of heat and cold especially : cold weather He waited outside for her in the bitter cold.
3 : a bodily disorder popularly associated with chilling specifically : common cold She came down with a cold.
out in the cold
: deprived of benefits given others the plan benefits management but leaves labor out in the cold

cold

adverb

Definition of cold (Entry 3 of 3)

1 : with utter finality : absolutely, completely turned down cold also : abruptly stopped them cold
2a : without introduction or advance notice walked in cold to apply for a job
b : without preparation or warm-up was asked to perform the solo cold

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Other Words from cold

Adjective

coldish \ ˈkōld-​ish How to pronounce cold (audio) \ adjective
coldly \ ˈkōl(d)-​lē How to pronounce cold (audio) \ adverb
coldness \ ˈkōl(d)-​nəs How to pronounce cold (audio) \ noun

Examples of cold in a Sentence

Adjective The water was too cold for swimming. The weather has been unusually cold this spring. a country with a cold climate It was a long, cold winter. It's cold outside, but the wind makes it feel even colder. It's bitterly cold out there! metal that is cold to the touch Are you cold? I could turn up the temperature if you'd like. a bowl of cold cereal He ate cold pizza for breakfast. Noun I mind cold more than heat. They died of exposure to cold. The cold really sets in around late November and doesn't let up until April. I stood there shivering in the cold. He waited outside for her in the bitter cold. Come in out of the cold. It's not the flu, it's just a cold. Adverb She was asked to perform the song cold.
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Recent Examples on the Web: Adjective The Phoenix Police Department's cold-case unit was on the cases again in 2011, according to court records. Jacques Billeaud, The Arizona Republic, 30 July 2021 Blankenship's name came up last year in at least one cold case investigation out of Kenton County, officials have previously said. Briana Rice, The Enquirer, 29 July 2021 The Polk County cold case came to McClary’s attention at the end of 2018. oregonlive, 8 Sep. 2021 The second cold-case homicide occurred about a year later, on March 15, 2008. Washington Post, 3 Sep. 2021 Sheriff’s deputies in Florida have cracked a 16-year-old cold case murder of a man who was shot and killed in September 2005, officials announced. Stephanie Pagones, Fox News, 3 Sep. 2021 At the same time, the cold case unit was starting to reopen the investigation. Correspondent Maureen Maher, CBS News, 21 Aug. 2021 The Salt Lake City Police Department has closed a missing person case from 1979, the oldest missing persons cold case closed in the department’s history. Jordan Miller, The Salt Lake Tribune, 20 Aug. 2021 The arrest in the cold case Thursday followed an ESPN investigative report in November 2020 into various leads, which also detailed the family's frustration with the police investigation. Mallika Kallingal And Rebekah Riess, CNN, 20 Aug. 2021 Recent Examples on the Web: Noun Several trends are to blame for soaring prices, including a resurgence of global demand after pandemic lockdowns, led by China, and a European cold snap in the latter part of winter this year that drained storage levels. Andrew Stuttaford, National Review, 10 Sep. 2021 The lethal Texas cold snap in February was likely a result of this stretching process, the scientists wrote. Robert Hart, Forbes, 3 Sep. 2021 Barring an early-autumn cold snap, all was on track for a new vintage. New York Times, 29 Aug. 2021 During a winter cold snap or a west-wide heat wave, that won’t cut it. oregonlive, 21 July 2021 Residents have been asked to conserve power four months after a deadly February cold snap paralyzed power plants across the state. Omar Villafranca, CBS News, 17 June 2021 The Star Tribune reported that the gas price spike caused by the unexpected Texas cold snap in February will cost Xcel Energy gas customers $215 million even while the utility made $27 million in commodity trading profits. John Farrell, Star Tribune, 6 June 2021 Aside from a February cold snap, the lakes had relatively little ice cover. John Flesher, chicagotribune.com, 10 May 2021 Had temperatures in March been lower this year, the cold snap this month would have caused less damage, experts say. Washington Post, 26 Apr. 2021 Recent Examples on the Web: Adverb Pure Kitchen is a must visit when in Ottawa, at the very least to get your healthy cold-pressed juice fix. Miriam Porter, Forbes, 3 Sep. 2021 In a street brawl, a man is knocked to a bench and cold-cocked. Tim Prudente, baltimoresun.com, 16 July 2021 Garrett Boorojian, managing partner at WaveCapital Partners, has used cold-calling for years to reach clients. Shama Hyder, Forbes, 19 June 2021 Both stylists recommend using cold-pressed virgin coconut oil that is raw and unfiltered to maximize the benefits. Maya Allen, Marie Claire, 16 July 2021 Suja touts being the first juice company to offer organic, cold-pressed juice for under $4. Rob Nikolewski, San Diego Union-Tribune, 13 July 2021 It can be baked, served as raw sashimi and cold-smoked. Jeff Kart, Forbes, 17 June 2021 These soaps are cold-processed and handmade by her mother, Susan. Akili King, Vogue, 12 Apr. 2021 Granted, as the head coach and team president of an NBA franchise, Popovich can’t just start cold-calling rival players and asking them out to expensive dinners. Mike Finger, San Antonio Express-News, 12 June 2021

These example sentences are selected automatically from various online news sources to reflect current usage of the word 'cold.' Views expressed in the examples do not represent the opinion of Merriam-Webster or its editors. Send us feedback.

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First Known Use of cold

Adjective

before the 12th century, in the meaning defined at sense 1a

Noun

before the 12th century, in the meaning defined at sense 2

Adverb

1889, in the meaning defined at sense 1

History and Etymology for cold

Adjective

Middle English, going back to Old English cald (Anglian), ceald (West Saxon), going back to Germanic *kalða- (whence Old Saxon cald "cold," Middle Dutch cout, Old High German kalt, Old Norse kaldr, Gothic kalds), verbal adjective from *kalan- "to be cold" (whence Old English calan "to be cold, to make cold," Old Norse kala "to freeze") going back to a dialectal Indo-European base *ǵel-, *ǵol-, whence also Latin gelū, gelus "frost, cold," gelāre "to freeze, chill"

Noun

Middle English, going back to Old English ceald, cald, noun derivative of ceald, cald cold entry 1 (or derivative from the Germanic base of these adjectives)

Adverb

derivative of cold entry 1

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Time Traveler for cold

Time Traveler

The first known use of cold was before the 12th century

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Dictionary Entries Near cold

colcothar

cold

cold agglutination

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Statistics for cold

Last Updated

15 Sep 2021

Cite this Entry

“Cold.” Merriam-Webster.com Dictionary, Merriam-Webster, https://www.merriam-webster.com/dictionary/cold. Accessed 24 Sep. 2021.

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More Definitions for cold

cold

adjective

English Language Learners Definition of cold

 (Entry 1 of 3)

: having a very low temperature
: having a feeling of low body heat
: not heated

cold

noun

English Language Learners Definition of cold (Entry 2 of 3)

: a cold condition
: cold weather
: a common illness that affects the nose, throat, and eyes and that usually causes coughing, sneezing, etc.

cold

adverb

English Language Learners Definition of cold (Entry 3 of 3)

: in a very clear, complete, and definite way
: in a sudden way
: without practicing or preparing before doing something

cold

adjective
\ ˈkōld How to pronounce cold (audio) \
colder; coldest

Kids Definition of cold

 (Entry 1 of 2)

1 : having a low temperature or one much below normal a cold day
2 : suffering from lack of warmth I feel cold.
3 : cooled after being cooked We ate cold chicken.
4 : served at a low temperature or with ice Have a cold drink.
5 : lacking warmth of feeling : unfriendly She's been cold to me ever since our disagreement.
in cold blood
: with planning beforehand

Other Words from cold

coldly adverb
coldness noun

cold

noun

Kids Definition of cold (Entry 2 of 2)

1 : a condition of low temperature : cold weather I can't stand the cold.
2 : the bodily feeling produced by lack of warmth : chill He was shivering with cold.

cold

adjective
\ ˈkōld How to pronounce cold (audio) \

Medical Definition of cold

 (Entry 1 of 3)

1a : having or being a temperature that is noticeably lower than body temperature and especially that is uncomfortable for humans a cold drafty room
b : having a relatively low temperature or one that is lower than normal or expected the bath water has gotten cold
c : receptive to the sensation of coldness : stimulated by cold a cold spot is a typical receptor in higher vertebrates
2 : marked by the loss of normal body heat cold hands
3 : dead
4 : exhibiting little or no radioactivity

Other Words from cold

coldness \ ˈkōl(d)-​nəs How to pronounce cold (audio) \ noun

cold

noun

Medical Definition of cold (Entry 2 of 3)

1 : bodily sensation produced by loss or lack of heat
2 : a bodily disorder popularly associated with chilling:
a in humans : common cold
b in domestic animals : coryza

COLD

abbreviation

Medical Definition of COLD (Entry 3 of 3)

More from Merriam-Webster on cold

Nglish: Translation of cold for Spanish Speakers

Britannica English: Translation of cold for Arabic Speakers

Britannica.com: Encyclopedia article about cold

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