chant

verb
\ ˈchant How to pronounce chant (audio) \
chanted; chanting; chants

Definition of chant

 (Entry 1 of 2)

intransitive verb

1 : to make melodic sounds with the voice especially : to sing a chant
2 : to recite something in a monotonous repetitive tone protesters were chanting outside

transitive verb

1 : to utter as in chanting
2 : to celebrate or praise in song or chant

chant

noun

Definition of chant (Entry 2 of 2)

2a : plainsong
b : a rhythmic monotonous utterance or song
c : a composition for chanting

Synonyms for chant

Synonyms: Verb

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Examples of chant in a Sentence

Verb The crowd began chanting her name. They chanted “Sara, Sara” until she came back on stage. Protesters were chanting outside the governor's home. They were chanting in Arabic. Priests chanted the Catholic Mass in Latin. Noun Our chant was “Peace now, peace now!”. Chant is often used as a form of meditation and prayer.
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Recent Examples on the Web: Verb For now, the AT&T Center might have to wait to chant his name. Jeff Mcdonald, San Antonio Express-News, 28 Oct. 2021 Sports crowds now chant the phrase, in addition to affixing it to signs and banners. Andy Meek, Forbes, 24 Oct. 2021 Nobody will actually chant this, but the truth will remain through a long cold winter. Bill Plaschke, Los Angeles Times, 23 Oct. 2021 At Oklahoma, Heisman favorite Spencer Rattler struggled again Saturday, which led Sooners fans to chant for true freshman backup QB Caleb Williams. Doug Lesmerises, cleveland, 26 Sep. 2021 Protesters gathered nearby to chant in opposition to the Games being held here. Washington Post, 7 Aug. 2021 In a video posted to his Twitter account, Johnson could be seen continuing to chant with protesters even after he was taken into custody with his hands bound in zip ties. BostonGlobe.com, 23 July 2021 Each death was captured on video and in front of witnesses, and both prompted protesters to chant the names of the deceased Black men nationwide. Bill Hutchinson, ABC News, 22 Apr. 2021 One temple said a group asked monks to chant for a sick grandmother as a distraction for stealing donation boxes. Nienke Onneweer, The Arizona Republic, 23 Apr. 2021 Recent Examples on the Web: Noun Named Kamo'oalewa, which derives from a Hawaiian creation chant that alludes to an offspring traveling on its own, the quasi-satellite was first discovered in 2016 by astronomers using the Pan-STARRS telescope in Hawaii. Ashley Strickland, CNN, 11 Nov. 2021 The occasional tomahawk chop and chant broke out as fans with views from high balconies looked down over the festivities. Tamar Hallerman, ajc, 5 Nov. 2021 Le chant du styrène, Mon oncle d’Amérique, Muriel or the Time of the Return, Night and Fog. Brian Tallerico, Vulture, 2 Nov. 2021 The video also features would could be a snippet of Motomami title track, with Rosalía turning the titular phrase into a hypnotic rave-up chant over a booming bass thump. Jon Blistein, Rolling Stone, 2 Nov. 2021 Last week, before their fans resumed the moronic, racist, tomahawk-chop chant, the defiant Braves trotted out notorious anti-vaxxer Travis Tritt for an NLCS national anthem. BostonGlobe.com, 29 Oct. 2021 Braves fans even brought the chop and chant to Houston. Charles Odum, chicagotribune.com, 28 Oct. 2021 The first down chant, the chainsaw, thousands of students in the lower sections energizing the stadium. oregonlive, 23 Oct. 2021 From behind home plate, there arose that racist chant from fans doing the tomahawk chop. Bill Plaschke, Los Angeles Times, 20 Oct. 2021

These example sentences are selected automatically from various online news sources to reflect current usage of the word 'chant.' Views expressed in the examples do not represent the opinion of Merriam-Webster or its editors. Send us feedback.

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First Known Use of chant

Verb

14th century, in the meaning defined at intransitive sense 1

Noun

15th century, in the meaning defined at sense 2a

History and Etymology for chant

Verb

Middle English chaunten, from Anglo-French chanter, from Latin cantare, frequentative of canere to sing; akin to Old English hana rooster, Old Irish canid he sings

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Time Traveler for chant

Time Traveler

The first known use of chant was in the 14th century

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Dictionary Entries Near chant

chanst

chant

chantable

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Statistics for chant

Last Updated

10 Nov 2021

Cite this Entry

“Chant.” Merriam-Webster.com Dictionary, Merriam-Webster, https://www.merriam-webster.com/dictionary/chant. Accessed 28 Nov. 2021.

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More Definitions for chant

chant

verb

English Language Learners Definition of chant

 (Entry 1 of 2)

: to say (a word or phrase) many times in a rhythmic way usually loudly and with other people
: to sing words and especially religious prayers by using a small number of musical notes that are repeated many times

chant

noun

English Language Learners Definition of chant (Entry 2 of 2)

: a word or phrase that is repeated in a rhythmic way usually loudly and by a group of people
: a kind of singing using a small number of musical notes that are repeated many times

chant

verb
\ ˈchant How to pronounce chant (audio) \
chanted; chanting

Kids Definition of chant

 (Entry 1 of 2)

1 : to sing using a small number of musical tones
2 : to recite or speak in a rhythmic usually loud way The crowd began chanting her name.

chant

noun

Kids Definition of chant (Entry 2 of 2)

1 : a melody in which several words or syllables are sung on one tone
2 : something spoken in a rhythmic usually loud way

More from Merriam-Webster on chant

Nglish: Translation of chant for Spanish Speakers

Britannica English: Translation of chant for Arabic Speakers

Britannica.com: Encyclopedia article about chant

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