cache

1 of 2

noun

1
a
: a hiding place especially for concealing and preserving provisions or implements
b
: a secure place of storage
discovered a cache of weapons
2
: something hidden or stored in a cache
The cache consisted of documents and private letters.
3
: a computer memory with very short access time used for storage of frequently or recently used instructions or data

called also cache memory

cache

2 of 2

verb

cached; caching

transitive verb

: to place (something) in a cache: such as
a
: to place or store (something) in a hidden or secure place for safety or concealment
cache camp supplies by a lake
coins cached in a teapot
b
computers : to place (instructions or data) in cache memory for temporary storage
caching websites to speed up future retrieval

Did you know?

Cash and Cache

Cache and cash are homophones (words that are pronounced alike but have different meanings, origins, or spelling) whose likeness in sound may lead to perplexity.

Cache primarily refers to a thing that is hidden or stored somewhere, or to the place where it is hidden. It has recently taken on another common meaning, “short-term computer memory where information is stored for easy retrieval.” Cash, on the other hand, is most often used in the sense “ready money.”

If you find yourself confused by these words, remember that you can store cash in a cache, but you can't do the reverse. Be mindful, too, that if you run out of cash you won't be able to buy something, but if you're short on cache, your computer won’t work.

Example Sentences

Noun a weapons cache used by terrorists Police found a cache of stolen cars in the woods. Her new laptop has one megabyte of cache. Verb an eccentric who cached money in odd places, such as under the boards of the floor cached the fugitives in their cellar until they could make their way to Canada
Recent Examples on the Web
Noun
Denmark is home to what’s thought to be the world’s largest collection of brains — a cache of 9,479 of them. Katie Hunt, CNN, 12 Nov. 2022 Meanwhile, a cache of the valuable ore is discovered in the Atlantic Ocean, where a mysterious tribe of feathered, fishlike creatures defends it with a combination of mesmeric powers and fierce fighting spirit. Ann Hornaday, Washington Post, 8 Nov. 2022 Colorado’s cache of psychedelic data could expose participants to social, legal, and financial risks. WIRED, 2 Nov. 2022 That said, hair disaster videos have unique cache on TikTok. Ellie Pithers, Vogue, 1 Nov. 2022 After 85 years, a cache of camera gear lost by two famed explorers has been recovered. Abigail Adams, Peoplemag, 28 Oct. 2022 Bombay Sapphire just launched a new bottle that, while technically not a celebrity spirit, does have a certain art-star cache to it. Jonah Flicker, Robb Report, 27 Oct. 2022 Terry Cummings, a member of the far-right Oath Keepers militia group, told a jury on Wednesday that members had put together a large weapons cache in a Virginia hotel room the night before rioters attacked the U.S. Capitol on Jan. 6, 2021. Keshia Butts And John Woolley, CBS News, 12 Oct. 2022 Chang-ho, previously called Big Mouth, is accused of being Big Mouse, a notorious conman, after a substantial cache of drugs, money, weapons and phones are discovered in his office. Joan Macdonald, Forbes, 4 Oct. 2022
Verb
In case something happens to Percy over the next few years, the rover will also cache some samples in a safe, flat place where they can be retrieved easily. WIRED, 16 Sep. 2022 However, this can be overcome by selecting technologies that can cache and automatically synchronize data to the cloud. Jiang Li, Forbes, 27 Dec. 2021 If all goes according to plan, Perseverance will amass dozens of rock samples from throughout Jezero Crater over the next couple years, then cache them for a future sample return mission to pick up. Ramin Skibba, Wired, 2 Sep. 2021 Eventually, the Perseverance rover will collect and cache the rock and regolith to be returned in a joint mission with the ESA (European Space Agency). Julia Musto, Fox News, 21 July 2021 The rover will cache soil samples for eventual return to Earth by a series of retrieval missions carried out jointly by NASA and the European Space Agency. Robert Lee Hotz, WSJ, 19 Apr. 2021 His followers should cache weapons, ammunition, hydrogen peroxide, kitchen matches. Dana Goodyear, The New Yorker, 8 Mar. 2021 Even more significant, Perseverance will cache the most intriguing Mars samples so that they can eventually be collected and brought back to Earth as early as 2031. Popular Science, 7 Jan. 2021 These middens are where the Mount Graham red squirrels cache their cones. Anton L. Delgado, The Arizona Republic, 2 Nov. 2020 See More

These example sentences are selected automatically from various online news sources to reflect current usage of the word 'cache.' Views expressed in the examples do not represent the opinion of Merriam-Webster or its editors. Send us feedback.

Word History

Etymology

Noun

borrowed from North American French, from French, "hiding place," noun derivative of cacher "to hide, conceal," going back to Old French cachier, quaichier "to put away, lock up, cover, remove from view, conceal" (also Middle French cacher "to press, crush"), going back to Vulgar Latin *coācticāre "to press, constrict," from Latin coāctāre "to compel" (frequentative of cōgere "to drive together, collect, compress, compel") + -icāre, verb formative — more at cogent

Note: The etymological sense "to compress, constrict" is not attested for the Old French verb, though it likely existed and is apparent in the prefixed form escachier "to crush and flatten, break by pressing or falling on." From the sense "compress" presumably developed the senses "lock up, cover, put away," and hence "remove from view, conceal," common from the sixteenth century. The sense "to press, crush" is marginally evident in Middle French in areas in contact with Occitan, though it penetrated widely enough to form the basis for the derivative cachet "seal" (see cachet).

Verb

verbal derivative of cache entry 1

First Known Use

Noun

1797, in the meaning defined at sense 1a

Verb

1805, in the meaning defined above

Time Traveler
The first known use of cache was in 1797

Dictionary Entries Near cache

Cite this Entry

“Cache.” Merriam-Webster.com Dictionary, Merriam-Webster, https://www.merriam-webster.com/dictionary/cache. Accessed 29 Nov. 2022.

Kids Definition

cache 1 of 2

noun

1
: a place for hiding, storing, or preserving treasure or supplies
2
: something hidden or stored in a cache
3
: a computer memory with very short access time

cache

2 of 2

verb

cached; caching
: to hide or store in a cache

More from Merriam-Webster on cache

Last Updated: - Updated example sentences
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