bypass

1 of 2

noun

by·​pass ˈbī-ˌpas How to pronounce bypass (audio)
1
: a passage to one side
especially : a deflected route usually around a town
2
a
: a channel carrying a fluid around a part and back to the main stream
(2)
: shunt sense 1c
also : a surgical procedure for the establishment of a shunt
have a coronary bypass

bypass

2 of 2

verb

bypassed; bypassing; bypasses

transitive verb

1
a
: to avoid by means of a bypass
bypass a congested area
b
: to cause to follow a bypass
2
a
: to neglect or ignore usually intentionally
b
: circumvent
attempting to bypass the law

Example Sentences

Noun The bridge is being rebuilt so we'll have to take the bypass. Verb To bypass the city, take the highway that circles it. Is there a way to bypass the bridge construction? He bypassed the manager and talked directly to the owner. She managed to bypass the usual paperwork.
Recent Examples on the Web
Noun
Will Dormann, a senior vulnerability analyst at security firm ANALYGENCE, discovered the bypass technique in July. Dan Goodin, Ars Technica, 9 Nov. 2022 Apple’s CAPTCHAs bypass in iOS 16 resulted from a collaboration with Cloudflare. Chris Smith, BGR, 29 Sep. 2022 Make clean and precise cuts with these bypass pruners, which feature an ergonomic rubber handle that minimizes physical strain. Alyssa Gautieri, Good Housekeeping, 22 Sep. 2022 The storm washed out that bypass for eastbound traffic heading toward Arizona. Ryan Randazzo, The Arizona Republic, 25 Aug. 2022 And paywall bypass for publishers willing to work with us. Los Angeles Times, 1 Nov. 2022 Most of the 35 states with these laws allow for judicial bypass, which permits a minor to obtain approval from a court. Jenna Carlesso, Hartford Courant, 28 July 2022 The final phase, an 8-kilometer-long (4.9 mile) bypass near the town of Ston, near Dubrovnik, is scheduled for completion in late 2023. Tamara Hardingham-gill, CNN, 27 July 2022 The only option for people under 18 in Florida who don’t have parental permission was what’s known as a judicial bypass, where a judge decides in court. Stephanie Loraine Piñeiro, refinery29.com, 24 June 2022
Verb
Additionally, in an effort to bypass the ever-escalating costs of bidding for sports rights, Netflix executives have had discussions about buying lower-profile leagues, people familiar with the discussions said. Jessica Toonkel, WSJ, 8 Nov. 2022 However, the biggest effort to bypass Egypt comes from Google. WIRED, 2 Nov. 2022 Many see these changes as an attempt to bypass the Conservative Party’s internal membership voting in the leadership contest and, as a result, could produce another leader who creates further political and economic instability. Jamie Dorrington, ABC News, 21 Oct. 2022 What other way is there to look at the decision by Guardians manager Terry Francona to bypass Tristan McKenzie for Gaddis? Paul Sullivan, Chicago Tribune, 16 Sep. 2022 For Ferree, who turns 16 later this month, the decision to bypass time with a Major League Soccer academy team or eventually play college soccer was simple: His goal has always been to play professionally and this move provides the quickest path. Ivan Carter, San Diego Union-Tribune, 14 Sep. 2022 Second, list out the other expectations or responsibilities that feel important but are distracting in order to bypass their false immediacy. Nicole Brant-zawadzki, Forbes, 4 Aug. 2022 In New Jersey, a student need only voice a religious objection to vaccinations to bypass the requirement. NBC News, 20 May 2021 Signal, whose app has been blocked in Iran since January, asked its users to set up proxy servers, allowing Iranians to bypass internet controls and access Signal. Nicholas Gordon, Fortune, 26 Sep. 2022 See More

These example sentences are selected automatically from various online news sources to reflect current usage of the word 'bypass.' Views expressed in the examples do not represent the opinion of Merriam-Webster or its editors. Send us feedback.

Word History

First Known Use

Noun

1848, in the meaning defined at sense 1

Verb

1736, in the meaning defined at sense 1a

Time Traveler
The first known use of bypass was in 1736

Dictionary Entries Near bypass

Cite this Entry

“Bypass.” Merriam-Webster.com Dictionary, Merriam-Webster, https://www.merriam-webster.com/dictionary/bypass. Accessed 28 Nov. 2022.

Kids Definition

bypass 1 of 2

noun

by·​pass ˈbī-ˌpas How to pronounce bypass (audio)
: a passage to one side or around a blocked or very crowded area

bypass

2 of 2

verb

: to make a detour around
bypass a city

Medical Definition

bypass

noun

by·​pass ˈbī-ˌpas How to pronounce bypass (audio)
: a surgically established shunt
cardiopulmonary bypass of blood from the right atrium to the aorta
also : a surgical procedure for the establishment of a shunt

Note: When a bypass is performed on more than one coronary artery or branch, the number of times (double, triple, etc.) is often specified.

I was immediately scheduled for a triple bypass, but they decided to try an angioplasty. Terry Todd, Sports Illustrated
see coronary artery bypass, gastric bypass, jejunoileal bypass
bypass transitive verb

More from Merriam-Webster on bypass

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