bring

verb

brought ˈbrȯt How to pronounce bring (audio) ; bringing ˈbriŋ-iŋ How to pronounce bring (audio)

transitive verb

1
a
: to convey, lead, carry, or cause to come along with one toward the place from which the action is being regarded
brought a bottle of wine to the party
b
: to cause to be, act, or move in a special way: such as
(1)
: attract
her screams brought the neighbors
(2)
: persuade, induce
try to bring them to his way of thinking
(3)
: force, compel
was brought before a judge
(4)
: to cause to come into a particular state or condition
bring water to a boil
c
dialect : escort, accompany
May I bring you home?
d
: to bear as an attribute or characteristic
brings years of experience to the position
2
: to cause to exist or occur: such as
a
: to be the occasion of
winter brings snow
b
: to result in
the drug brought immediate relief
brought tears to her eyes
c
: institute
bring legal action
d
: adduce
bring an argument
3
: prefer
whether to bring legal charges against him
4
: to procure in exchange : sell for
should bring a high price at auction

intransitive verb

chiefly Midland US : yield, produce
bringer noun
Phrases
bring forth
1
: bear
brought forth fruit
2
: to give birth to : produce
3
: adduce
bring forth persuasive arguments
bring forward
1
: to produce to view : introduce
brought new evidence forward
2
: to carry (a total) forward
bring home
: to make unmistakably clear
brought home the importance of exercise
bring to account
1
: to bring to book
must be brought to account for her mistakes
2
bring to bear
: to use with effect
bring pressure to bear
bring to book
: to compel to give an account
bring to light
: disclose, reveal
bring new facts to light
bring to mind
: recall
These events bring to mind another time in history.
bring to terms
: to compel to agree, assent, or submit
bring up the rear
: to come last or behind

Example Sentences

“Should I send you a check?” “Why not just bring me the money when you come?” Have you brought the money with you from the bank? She brought her boyfriend home to meet her parents. Love of adventure brought her here before taking her to many other places. This radio station brings you all the news as it happens. Can anything bring peace to this troubled region? Having a baby has brought great happiness into her life. See More
Recent Examples on the Web Make the frosting: In a small saucepan, bring the margarine or butter, the ⅓ cup evaporated milk, the brown sugar, and salt to a boil over medium-high heat. Susan Puckett, CNN, 27 Jan. 2023 The Disney100 celebration will also bring tons of new merchandise, specialty food and platinum park decorations to peruse. Charles Trepany, USA TODAY, 27 Jan. 2023 Justin and Hailey Bieber bring their style to the streets of N.Y.C. on Jan 24. People Staff, Peoplemag, 27 Jan. 2023 This alone should bring some cheer to the global economy in 2023. Vasuki Shastry, Forbes, 27 Jan. 2023 Medicare reforms embedded in the Inflation Reduction Act will bring savings to seniors this year. Helen Ouyang, New York Times, 26 Jan. 2023 The finishing touch to any room, throw pillows bring color, pattern, and texture to a space, no matter your palette or style. Jennifer Carmichael, Better Homes & Gardens, 26 Jan. 2023 In a small pot or kettle, bring the water to a rolling boil. M. Carrie Allan, Washington Post, 26 Jan. 2023 Hachimura, acquired from Washington on Monday for surplus guard Kendrick Nunn and three second-round draft picks, should bring them size and three-point shooting. Los Angeles Times, 26 Jan. 2023 See More

These example sentences are selected automatically from various online news sources to reflect current usage of the word 'bring.' Views expressed in the examples do not represent the opinion of Merriam-Webster or its editors. Send us feedback.

Word History

Etymology

Middle English, from Old English bringan; akin to Old High German bringan to bring, Welsh hebrwng to accompany

First Known Use

before the 12th century, in the meaning defined at transitive sense 1a

Time Traveler
The first known use of bring was before the 12th century

Dictionary Entries Near bring

Cite this Entry

“Bring.” Merriam-Webster.com Dictionary, Merriam-Webster, https://www.merriam-webster.com/dictionary/bring. Accessed 6 Feb. 2023.

Kids Definition

bring

verb
brought ˈbrȯt How to pronounce bring (audio) ; bringing ˈbriŋ-iŋ How to pronounce bring (audio)
1
: to cause to come with oneself by carrying or leading especially to the place from which the action is viewed
bring a lunch
2
: to cause to reach a certain state or take a certain action
bring water to a boil
couldn't bring myself to say it
3
: to cause to arrive or exist
winter will bring snow
bring legal action
4
: to sell for
will bring a good price
bringer noun

Legal Definition

bring

transitive verb
brought ˈbrȯt How to pronounce bring (audio) ; bringing ˈbriŋ-iŋ How to pronounce bring (audio)
: to begin or commence (a legal proceeding) through proper legal procedure: as
a
: to put (as a lawsuit) before a court
b
: to formally assert (as a charge or indictment)
brought charges against him

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